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  #1  
Old 10-06-2015, 01:58 PM
Cil Female Cil is offline
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Default What have you done to prep your kitchen?

I'm getting rid of tephlon. I have a good starter set of cast iron and yesterday I bought a 11 piece stainless steel set. I still need a good roasting pan which I plan to get that tomorrow. I'm also slo my but surely getting rid of the plastic spoons and spatulas, etc. I have stainless steel mixing bowls. It's getting there.
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:51 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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I'm building up a group of pots and pans that can be used on the wood cookstove. I have several sizes of cast iron skillets and pots, a Dutch oven, muffin pan, and some other baking pan shapes. I want a non-electric waffle iron and hand crank bread machine. We have a camp fire popcorn popper, a mandolin slicer. DS keeps saying he's going to fix me up a bike-powered blender. I hope so.
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Old 10-12-2015, 05:14 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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I also am prepping my kitchen by replacing everything that is plastic or non stick to glass, stainless steel and cast iron. Not only replacing all that, but getting rid of most counter top appliances that take up space and will no longer be needed.
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:38 PM
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The wife purchased a set of triply stainless steel cookware back in the early 70's. I don't know how many pieces of cast iron cookware she has, but they are numerous and then there is the corning ware with a few odd pieces. We got rid of most all aluminum cookware in the late 70 & early 80's except a couple of cast aluminum items we used for camping. She has both stainless steel and glass bowls.

We have been working at purchasing manual things which have almost disappeared from the modern kitchen like can openers, egg beaters, stainless steel wisps for stirring/mixing, wooden spoons, spatulas, etc.

Her pressure canner does not require a gasket. We are trying to eliminate as many weak links in the process and activities of day to day living as possible. We certainly don't object to having & using the more modern conveniences, but work at having backups to be prepared just in case.

Additionally, we have a number of manual meat and grain grinders, a stainless steel ground meat mixer and sausage stuffer and a meat jerky gun/dispenser also.

Last edited by Jjr; 10-12-2015 at 11:42 PM. Reason: forgot the grinders
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Old 10-13-2015, 12:40 AM
TnAndy Male TnAndy is offline
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What we did to prep our kitchen was build an auxiliary kitchen off the back of the garage. It is our meat cutting area primarily, with canning as a backup to the main house kitchen.

I put a wood stove out there for back up cooking, couldn't figure a way to get a chimney in the main kitchen. Probably better it's out there anyway, if we had to use it in warm weather, it wouldn't heat up the house.

The room is 12x22', with a 6x6 walk-in cooler and 5x6 pantry on one end. Other end is counter space with a used, commercial deep 2 compartment sink, and a dishwasher pulled from the main kitchen during a remodel. We use it to run jars now. Whole room is tiled up 4', tile floor with floor drains, so can hose the entire thing down with hot water (hose connected to 30 gal undercounter tank).

Cut a 5' wide hole in the back wall of the garage for a set of double doors into the new kitchen. Cut the garage floor to tie in new drain plumbing.



Prepped an area for the new slab:



Framed walls out of 2x6's. All lumber cut off my place.



Framed roof, tied it into the existing garage roof.

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Old 10-13-2015, 12:41 AM
TnAndy Male TnAndy is offline
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continued........

Fount a used cooler door (Craig's List), framed in room for cooler, then insulated with foam panels. Finished inside with white fiberglass panels.



3 pigs hanging in cooler one year past.



Wood stove and pantry door.



Other end. Doors/etc finished later.

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Old 10-13-2015, 12:43 AM
TnAndy Male TnAndy is offline
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continued............

Pantry interior.



Entrance from garage. Added jar storage cabinets on either side of the door.



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Old 10-21-2015, 03:35 PM
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WOW.... Quite a project Andy.... I'm a real piker compared to a project like that...

Just being 1 here in this kitchen.. The "preps" I have are meager indeed.. I have the usual assortment of electric gadgets.. Again being single my slow cookers, microwave, and as an old guy my electric jar opener are essential..

Coffee makers don't fit in this as they are a whole different importance to life.. Kind of as important as water or oxygen... I have 3 counter top coffee makers of different kinds.. And 3 outdoor methods of coffee making..

For non electric cooking I have stainless steel cook ware, some cast iron cook ware.. I use stainless bowls as I can dent them, but not break any... so far... I keep 3 good quality hand can openers on hand.. Two gas grills, a couple LP gas cook burners, a Coleman LP camp stove, and a LP turkey fryer burner with stainless pot...

And to go with this.... About 98% of all this has come from thrift stores and garage sales at a lot less price than new..

If I had to name one electric "luxury" item I would miss the most.. That would be my electric jar opener.. But a pair of adjustable strap wrenches make up for that well enough.. Old guys adapt and overcome..

Take care...
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Old 10-24-2015, 07:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
For non electric cooking I have stainless steel cook ware, some cast iron cook ware.. I use stainless bowls as I can dent them, but not break any... so far... I keep 3 good quality hand can openers on hand.. Two gas grills, a couple LP gas cook burners, a Coleman LP camp stove, and a LP turkey fryer burner with stainless pot...

Take care...
Wyobuckaroo, reading your post did jog my memory a little.

We camped and owned a number of different campers (for vacations too) when the children were growing up. We haven't been camping in some time and probably will not be camping anytime soon with Mother & Mother-in-Law living with us.

The campers were outfitted with all sorts of camping equipment and supplies, but we did purchase a Coleman stove specifically for home use in case of power outages (in preference to going and digging through the camper each time one was needed in the house) and the wife keeps it in her pantry.

We also have in addition to the standard charcoal grill two smokers and two propane appliances (one a twin burner outdoor stove and the other a counter top restaurant style steak grill designed for interior use- but anything meat related will cook on it just fine & we have it on a stainless steel cart with tray's underneath & wheels for outside grilling).

We have three of the small propane bottles (two from the camper & one for home use - but they are swapped around as needed) and two of the larger propane bottles for an old Howard Trailer (which also has a four burner propane range top and propane heater) we purchased for the children to live in while attending college (mostly used for storage now). With winter coming on, I need to check all the bottles and have any empties filled in case we have any power outages.
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Old 11-07-2015, 04:36 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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I have a few questions about cast iron dutch ovens before I purchase any. What sizes do you find you use the most and is it best to get the ones with the legs or no legs?
Thanks
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Old 11-07-2015, 10:06 PM
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Jeanb, we prefer dutch ovens without legs, but that is our perspective.

If cooking on a stove top, or in an oven, where our are principally used, those legs sometimes get in the way and hang on the wire racks or burners. Then on the other hand if the dutch oven will be primarily use camping or out-of-doors the legs may become more of an asset, especially if there will be any pit cooking (or more correctly baking) pursued.

To provide a suggestion for your dutch oven question, regarding size, more information is needed.
Like:
1.) How many adults will you be cooking for on average when preparing meals in your dutch oven? How many children?
2.) Those things are H-e-a-v-y, before food is added. So how often do you anticipate the dutch oven being used?
3.) Larger may be better, but smaller may be handier and more convenient to use.
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Old 11-07-2015, 10:30 PM
Cil Female Cil is offline
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Jeanne, think of this way, no legs, indoor and outdoor use. Legs, strictly outdoor use. I so iwould get at least 1 with legs in case you have to cook over a fire pit. The rest no legs.
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Old 11-07-2015, 11:38 PM
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Default Lodge Logic Sizing Guide

Diameter Capacity Depth Typical uses:

6.625 - 1 Qt - 3 - Sauces, relishes, chutnies
8 - 2 Qt 3 - Side dishes, sauces
10 - 4 Qt - 3.5 - Side dishes, casseroles, beans
12 - 6 Qt - 3.75 - Stews, beans,small roasts, potatoes, casseroles, desserts, breads
12 Deep - 8 Qt - 5 - Larger Roasts, whole chickens, stews, bread
14 - 8 Qt - 3.75 - Stews, small roasts, casseroles, desserts, beans, bread
14 Deep - 10 Qt - 5 - Hams, pork shoulder, whole chickens, standing rib
16 - 12 Qt - 4.25 - Large roasts, dutch oven meals for large groups
--- --- --- --- ---
Diameter and Depth are both in inches.

May this information help you determine the size dutch oven you need.

Previewing the post, I discover the chart is all run-together and I can not separate it again as it was printed, but to help separate each line a little I went back and inserted dashes between each division. I hope the dashes help with clarity in reading each line.
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Old 04-01-2017, 01:42 AM
Cil Female Cil is offline
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I thought I would bring this back up.
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Old 04-02-2017, 10:21 PM
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OK, my two cents...

I know this is about food and the kitchen but I will tell you about my kitchen and also the hot water for the kitchen and the rest of the house.

I have converted my house -- kitchen stove, water heater and clothes dryer -- to propane. An "80 gallon" bottle lasts me around 11 months, and I have three of them. I heat my house with wood.

Propane is a bit cheaper in the summer, this is when I fill up the empties.

My biggest savings came from replacing the conventional water heater with a tankless or "on-demand" water heater. Consider this:

After replacing my conventional water heater that had a pilot light with one that did not, I lit the pilot light in my oven and left it on just for grins, the flame was about the same size as the water heater had. Normally I only use the oven occasionally so I just light it when needed, say for the weekend, but I did this to see the consumption.

Big difference. With the pilot light on in my oven I ran out of gas in three months; this is on one bottle and as stated above I usually get around 11 months. Needless to say, I won't be doing that foolishness again! But now I know!

My next savings will come when I put up a clothes-line outside and use the clothes dryer much less. I already have some T-posts for this.

Oh, yeah, my tankless water heater ran for over a year on two "D" cell batteries only. After about 14 months I took the batteries out so they would not corrode the battery box if they puked and now I just run it on the wall wart.

So I have almost three years of household and kitchen plus hot water on stand-by and if I could get more motivated then even better. But I'm just bachin' it here and, well... you know.

Tinker
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Old 04-03-2017, 05:17 PM
sethwyo sethwyo is offline
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you need to build your food storage shelves with Guard Rails, glass jars will break when they fall, many things can make things on shelves fall. shifting ground or winds.

items than wont break when the fall can be damaged if there is water on the ground from a flood or other things.

a dutch oven with legs is great for cooking outside on the ground, such as in a cook pit/hole where you need fire under the pot. the duch ovens in general are for cooking outside or in the oldtime open fire places, the electric crock pot is our modern equilivent.
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Old 04-29-2017, 11:05 PM
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We just moved from a nearly 1800sf house to a 600sf cabin. Talk about shock therapy. After we empty nested some time ago the Mister turned one of the old bedrooms 14x12 into a walk in pantry with shelves galore. We had room for freezers, bins, barrels, you name it. it was great but that new addition had a honeymoon season. I filled it to the brim in case the SHTF. Then we decided to move and I barely have room to turn around in the new kitchen space. I started planning an expensive addition to remedy this. Then we started packing. There were things to fix in both places so the move took a few weeks to complete. During this process I purged and then purged some more. studied up on minimalist living (I am not a fan, I like some of my junk) but it had to be done. It made me step back and really look at the items I had and which ones I really use. After the big purge I put the bulk of the remaining stuff in storage until I got my business together at the new place. As it turned out that itty bitty kitchen was pretty darn functional. More so that my 16x20 in the old house. I went from banks of cabinets to 4 drawers and about 4 cabinets. I had to really love or need what I brought in. After about a month I went to the storage building and started pulling out boxes and dragging stuff in the house and while sitting in that pile of stuff I had no where to put I decided hmmm I've gotten along for weeks now with out missing this junk I don't need it after all. Started hauling it off. Then the challenge was making room for the pantry and canning equipment. Sticking with just what I needed made it easier. I use a loft as a pantry instead of a sleeping area and its working out pretty good. When we were doing the purge I had to throw out about $2k worth of groceries including stock piled dog biscuits. Much of it had gone bad because I did it without really knowing what we needed. I feel a lot more organized now and confident my stores will last whether it be food or the items I use to prep them. One item we ditched was the giant side by side fridge it was all bark and no bite. Got a simple style with one big door. Now I have a shelf big enough to slide in the whole darn Christmas turkey. We got a gas stove to replace the electric. We downsized from a 75 gal water heater to a 30 gallon, so far no issues with running out even during a canning marathon. I tossed all the Teflon years ago when I found out it was no Bueno and switched to cast iron. it can do double duty indoors or out. I hang it from the ceiling to save space, when people see it they think it is some sort of collection on display I have to tell them um no I use it to cook with. I also switched a lot of cooking items to enamelware. Got ride of tons of gadgets and gizmos that did nothing but take up space and lose parts. He is planning to construct a commercial kitchen in his shop to alleviate some of the space issues when processing hogs and such and a smoke house is on the list.
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Old 04-30-2017, 10:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugarfoot View Post
...I decided hmmm I've gotten along for weeks now with out missing this junk I don't need it after all....
What was it that Thoreau said about simplifying?

We faced the exact same situation when we moved last summer. Now after paying for storage for a whole year, we'll wind up throwing most of that junk out anyways.
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