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Old 06-10-2017, 12:05 AM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Default RHUBARB....

Rhubarb has threatened to take over.
Here in our part of the bush, in the far north, rhubarb is the first thing to become available at this time. I know a lot of you have had many other things for some time now, but here is different. We harvest and enjoy it as it comes.

It has been somewhat dry for a time, but we got a bit of rain late last week and now again the start of this weekend. With our 20-22 daylight hour days this time of year, it seems the 5 or so small patches of rhubarb we have all have matured at once.. It has been time to get busy.

Wildcat has been a busy girl making several kinds of rhubarb jam, marmalade, compote, BBQ sauce, and several varieties of baked goods.

Several containers of this fruit bounty have gone to the freezer for later creations. It has all tasted good to me.
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Old 06-10-2017, 07:11 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Congrats on your harvest! Some of the folks in the South may never have tasted it. We get chives, lettuce (greenhouse), and Welsh onions this time of year. I have occasionally over-wintered parsnips, too. We have lots of stuff up now in the garden, but nothing ready to harvest...and the salmon have started. We got our fences repaired to defend the garden from moose attack, and the bears are very active in the area, but seldom cause us trouble here.
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:22 AM
hunter88 hunter88 is online now
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I do love rhubarb pie, but not one watered down with strawberries.

Last year I found a recipe for rhubarb ice cream you could make using a blender. Just in case anyone is interested.

3 C sliced rhubarb
2 C sugar
1 t lemon juice
1 C heavy cream

Combine rhubarb and sugar, place in an ungreased 9x13 baking pan and bake 30 to 40 minutes at 375. Stir occasionally. Cool slightly.

Put in blender, puree, place in fridge until cold, add lemon juice.

Beat cream until stiff peaks. fold in rhubarb. Place in shallow freezer container. Freeze 1 hour stirring every 15 minutes. Freeze until firm.
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Old 06-11-2017, 04:58 PM
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Stand by... Eventually I'm thinking Wildcat will be writing an article about her/our far north rhubarb experiences.. This is bound to include her killer good BBQ sauce recipe.. Yummm
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Old 06-19-2017, 11:43 AM
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Never knew rhubarb could be used for anything other than pie. My mother-in-law used to grow it and it came up every year. Now that I know that it is fairly versatile, I think I'll try some! Do you have much trouble with critters eating it?

Tim, it sounds like you have a new addition to your household! Welcome, Miz Wildcat
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Old 06-19-2017, 05:04 PM
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Never had a problem with critters and rhubarb, but then the leaves are toxic so that may be a factor.

Smart ones don't eat it, dumb ones just never come back.
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Old 06-19-2017, 06:28 PM
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What Hunter88 said about plant eating critters.. They won't touch the stuff I've found..

There are holes in the leaves, and a bug/worm on the lower end of the stalk as summer goes on here in the far north. No idea what bugs are doing this. It is not a bad enough infestation to need intervention it seems. Just cut off lower end of stem and good to go.

We have boiled and strained the leaves to an witches brew green looking almost syrup that you mix with dish soap, reduce by half with water and use for aphid type bugs on pepper plants and the like. Dead bugs will look like white Kosher salt crystals on the ground. Wildcat does all this, as if I touch plants they die...
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Old 06-20-2017, 07:05 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Horton View Post
What Hunter88 said about plant eating critters.. They won't touch the stuff I've found..

There are holes in the leaves, and a bug/worm on the lower end of the stalk as summer goes on here in the far north. No idea what bugs are doing this. It is not a bad enough infestation to need intervention it seems. Just cut off lower end of stem and good to go.

We have boiled and strained the leaves to an witches brew green looking almost syrup that you mix with dish soap, reduce by half with water and use for aphid type bugs on pepper plants and the like. Dead bugs will look like white Kosher salt crystals on the ground. Wildcat does all this, as if I touch plants they die...
How do you make the "witches' brew"? How many leaves in how much water and cook for how long? See if you can pass along Wildcat's recipe. Some years the aphids go wild here, especially in the greenhouses. I think that the leaves contain high concentrations of oxalate (stems have some, too, but not nearly so much) and most critters can't tolerate it. If I recall, asparagus has the same chemical, but in lower concentrations. Doc may remember as it also has a connection to some kidney stones.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:25 PM
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Look in "plant" area for

RHUBARB LEAF Bug Killer post.
Recipe and instructions there in.

I did the initial boiling and reduction of the concentrate on an outdoor fire. I suspect if done indoors, do so only on a day when you can assure good ventilation.
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