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  #1  
Old 06-20-2017, 01:18 PM
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Default RHUBARB LEAF Bug Killer..

Rhubarb Leaf Bug Killer..
by Wildcat
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About 1 G (4L) water.
4-5 rhubarb leaves (dinner plate size or bigger)
Cut up leaves in bacon strip size length and width
Boil leaves to reduce liquid to half or so
Strain out pulp through old T shirt material as many times as needed to produce a liquid that will not clog a spray bottle if you choose that to apply with.
---
Cool concentrate to room temp.
Add a short 1/4 cup dish soap per 1 qt concentrate.
---
To use, mix concentrate and water equal parts.
May be used in a spray bottle if the concentrate is filtered well enough.
--
Works for aphids on pepper plants for instance, and likely other bugs as well
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Old 06-20-2017, 05:09 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Thanks for that! It may come in handy.
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Old 06-21-2017, 07:43 AM
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Excellent! I love organic solutions (no pun intended) to gardening problems.

But I see two problems with this recipe:

(a) Catch 22: you need good rhubarb leaves to make a soln. so can get good rhubarb leaves so you can use good rhubarb leaves to make a soln to get good rhubarb leaves so you can use good rhubarb leaves to make a soln etc etc...

(2) Old T-shirt??? I wear mine until there's nothing left but the little white label that says "L---Made in China"
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Old 06-21-2017, 02:19 PM
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Catch 22. ?? Well.. Maybe.. But when I go out to collect rhubarb so Wildcat can make any number of the things she does with that fruit, the leaves can go into the pot.

My T shirts get pretty ratty at times. But I am "required" to replace them before they get too ratty. At least if I want to eat rhubarb products from this kitchen.

If you are lucky she will post her rhubarb and sourdough sweet cake recipe... That is all I'm allowed to say about that.
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:17 PM
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That seems like an awful lot of soap.
I bet a few drops would work just as well
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:43 PM
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I'll bet that the soap is the bug killer for the soft-bodied things like aphids. The oxalates in the rhubarb would be for the chewers, such as caterpillars, beetles, and grasshoppers. A scant 1/4 cup of soap per liter diluted by 1/2 would be 2 tablespoons per liter--not a terrible amount. It does say soap, not detergent. University of Connecticut recommends 2.5 fl. oz. (5 tablespoons per gallon), which would be 1 1/4 tablespoons per quart.

http://florawww.eeb.uconn.edu/msds/i...soap_label.pdf
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Old 06-25-2017, 05:11 PM
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Actually the soap is usually the spreader or sticker to get the spray to cover the leaf and offer the best protection.

We've used natural insect sprays for our horses. Mainly just to keep flies away rather then kill anything. Here Dawn dish washing liquid was used to get good coverage.

When I managed an apple orchard we had something similar so we'd get good coverage on the leaves of the trees.
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Old 06-25-2017, 09:24 PM
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Default Interesting Note.....

The concentrate we made almost a week (?) ago now..
Has turned from a dull kind of puke green color to Cherry Kool-Aid, blood red color...
==
The soap in most any mixture will be pretty much a universal wetting agent that breaks the cohesion of water (tendency to bead up like on a waxed car hood) to, like said, make it coat the entire surface it is on at the moment.
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Old 06-26-2017, 06:20 AM
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If the soap were only a spreader/sticker, you wouldn't need nearly that much. When I used wetting agents in sprays, I used very small amounts. When I use it as an active agent to break the waxy or oily coating on soft-bodied pests, such as thrips, aphids, etc., I use a much higher concentration. A potassium based soap such as the Safers formula is preferred by most organic gardeners. Detergents in high concentrations are much more likely to damage the plants protective coatings and lead to dehydration of tender plant leaves as well as dehydrating the soft-bodied pests. Members of the cole family such as cabbage can tolerate high concentrations of most wetting agents, but I have found that lettuce, peas, and beans are more susceptible to drying damage particularly from high concentrations of detergents.

My two cents more.
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Old 06-26-2017, 10:18 AM
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That makes a lot of sense. So in small amounts it acts as a spreader/sticker, but in larger amounts it's designed to kill the insect.
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Old 06-27-2017, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post
That makes a lot of sense. So in small amounts it acts as a spreader/sticker, but in larger amounts it's designed to kill the insect.
Right. When I have used spreader/sticker, it was more on the order of 1 or 2 tablespoons per gallon. When it is the active agent, it is much more concentrated. I just assumed that it was an active agent since 1/4 cup per liter of concentrate would amount to 1/8 cup per liter of the final solution, which would be more like 4 to 8 times as strong as I usually use as a wetting agent.
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Old 06-28-2017, 01:38 PM
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This is interesting. Thanks for posting. I might just try it, although I agree with those who mentioned that it would probably work just as well with a bit less soap.
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