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Old 07-24-2017, 11:39 AM
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Default Struggles of rural America 30's

Just to post something beside the daily weather report I thought some might find this article interesting. It highlights the photographers of the the. FSA in the 30's.

Meet 10 Depression-Era Photographers Who Captured the Struggle of Rural America - Smithsonian
https://apple.news/Awz57wrrGTOCiORQM6bKOHg

If it peeks your interest here is some more from the library of congress:

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collecti...ngamerica.html
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Old 07-25-2017, 12:26 PM
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Thanks for the links, MOFree. I like checking out fashions & lifestyles from the past. That's why I watch movies from the 20s -40s on TCM channel-- it helps you appreciate our present. I bet 80 yrs from now they'll be looking at our stuff and wonder at how simple life was in the 20-teens.

By coincidence, I had just come here from another forum discussing immigration. I reminded those who think we need immigrants to do our dirty work of the internal migration we had here in the 30s. Without govt programs to keep the down-and-out comfortable in their poverty, they had to pack themselves up and go where the jobs were. We didn't need external immigrants then.
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Old 07-25-2017, 01:31 PM
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Thanks for the links, MOFree. I like checking out fashions & lifestyles from the past. That's why I watch movies from the 20s -40s on TCM channel-- it helps you appreciate our present. I bet 80 yrs from now they'll be looking at our stuff and wonder at how simple life was in the 20-teens.

By coincidence, I had just come here from another forum discussing immigration. I reminded those who think we need immigrants to do our dirty work of the internal migration we had here in the 30s. Without govt programs to keep the down-and-out comfortable in their poverty, they had to pack themselves up and go where the jobs were. We didn't need external immigrants then.
Yes they went but there were no jobs anywhere, read the greatest American novel - the grapes of wrath. Different than today- the jobs in the fields are still there but the only people taking them are immigrants.
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Old 07-25-2017, 01:56 PM
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Consequences of that time of the world are still evident here in the bush. Not documented in detail like the US south and west and other regions, but none the less.

Near our bush there are the remnants of log cabins and such documented as belonging to someone who just didn't come home sometime between 1914-18.. Then a gap in history to the mid 1930s with the same result.

The lumber and other natural resource industries here suffered like everything else during the 1930s time. Then the same again in 1940-45, but to a smaller extent than WW1 time.

To an extent you can track a migration of sorts today. Neighborhoods of Winnipeg, Edmonton, Vancouver and many many other places.. Not to the extreme like Detroit maybe, but none the less.

Funny at times in that the more things change, the less some parts of history change.
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Old 07-25-2017, 07:35 PM
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My heroes are the my grandmothers, grandfathers, great aunts and uncles who were in their prime during those years. They worked unbelievably hard and lived through very tough times and lived to tell about it. Raised their families during those years. They're all gone now but I well remember conversations amongst them on Sunday afternoons when they'd gather to visit after church and a big dinner. I swear anyone of those women could prepare a meal for a dozen people who arrived without warning.

The men were farmers except for my grandfather who had a filling station, ice delivery, fuel delivery business. Yet on a Sunday they were all dressed in suits, white shirts and ties and the women in their best dresses, hose and hats. No one would have considered going to church or to call in less. About the only time I saw my grandmother without her apron was going to church! If company dropped in, she'd whisk off the dirty apron and put on a clean one as she went to the door.

I recall my grandfather coming home for lunch in the mid 1950's and telling grandmother that he'd finally been paid the last of the money customers had charged during the Depression and WWII years. Back then especially in small towns such paying such bills were a matter of honor.

My dad won a full ride scholarship to college, but his parents needed him working and earning so didn't allow him to go. My mom started college, but after her first year had to quit and come home due to lack of funds.
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Old 07-25-2017, 10:45 PM
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My dad won a full ride scholarship to college, but his parents needed him working and earning so didn't allow him to go..
Same story for my mom. She likes to tell the story of how her co-workers at the Stop & Shop in The Loop in Chicago always talked to her in raised voices thinking she was hard of hearing. She began working at age 13 under her older sister Kay's birth certificate. They would call "Kay! ...Kay!.. and my ma would forget to answer to that name until their shouting finally sank in.
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Old 07-26-2017, 01:31 AM
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My paternal grandfather had purchased the lumber from or through his employer, just before the Depression hit. He certainly didn't work every day, but he did get at least a couple of days work most every week. [He though he got to work as much as he did, so he could pay a little along on his bill, but apparently his employer did try and work all of their employees some each month.]

My grandfather had 40 acres at that time and much of it was under cultivation. When not working for the company he was working in the garden and/or the fields. My grandmother and her sister canned everything they could for the winter. During the season just about anything that could be grown they had fresh to eat, including peaches, plumbs, figs & pomegranate. They also picked wild Blackberries & Huckleberries [(smaller native Blue berries) also called June berries by some] for pies and canning for winter use too. Grain was raised to feed the poultry, cattle, horses & hogs during the winter months. Usually three or four hogs would be pinned up and fed grain to fatten them until they could be butchered. The meat would be salted in stone crocks and smoked to preserve it, since there was no refrigeration at that time. Rendered fat from the hogs would be stored and become their next years cooking lard (grease/oil) for use in the kitchen.

Squirrels would also supplement the table during the hunting season.

As soon as the spring & summer producing crops had finished their harvest, the ground where they were planted would be prepared for fall crops like Turnips, Collard & Mustard greens. Turnips were planted heavily, and although some were eaten, but for the most part their cattle could graze on the Turnips tops and in the spring the roots would be turned under to enrich the soil, so Turnips were a multi purpose crop.

Unharvested peas, beans, peppers, etc would be left on the vine until they had dried, then they would be gathered (peas & beans, etc), shelled & stored dry. Popcorn & peanuts would be stored along with pumpkins, potatoes, sweet potatoes and anything else they had space for in the "potato house" and covered with straw or hay to help protect the foods.

Seeds were saved from the best specimens of each and every species, and in abundance, just in case any crops had to be replanted.

Chickens were maintained along with a couple of milk cows, for eggs, milk & butter, along with the occasional chicken dinner or chicken & dumplings. Each year a few hens would be allowed to set on a nest of eggs to raise replacement layers and fryers for the next year.

They didn't have hardly any money, but they ate as well as any of their neighbors, probably better than some. Other than the lumber bill, money was used only to purchase the most basic staples like sugar, coffee, salt (mainly for curing meat), maybe a little flour, a little ammo along and from time to time a few millinery items for sewing. Harvested corn was shelled mechanically and ground into corn meal.
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