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Old 02-28-2018, 06:31 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Default Meal-in-a-Jar Recipe

I've spent a part of this winter researching Meal-in-a-Jar recipes. With a difference... NOT the cutie things with the picture perfect layers and cute cloth on top like you give Grandma for a gift. With ingredients that go stale in a year or less. But meals that can be good long term and storage stable in a cold, dark, dry environment.

I've searched you tube and the web till I'm about gone crazy, (short trip) and 99.99% of recipes are for the cute Grandma type thing, or use ingredients hard or expensive to get. I need recipes that more closely fit the prepper lifestyle, not cute and short term. Recipes for baked brownies and such are likely not a good fit here.

I do have a couple things I've put together with homemade and common available ingredients. But I'm looking for more variety of recipes. I will be glad to post recipes I have made up and used successfully, as they prove out to be useful. For instance, I have a potato, bacon, veggie cream soup in a quart jar that boiled up with 4 quarts water feeds 2 normal adults and one big young guy.

You most likely know where I'm coming from and looking for more so than any other group on the planet. So......

KEY word here is common available ingredients. Overly expensive ingredients from outdoor stores, internet places,
Anyone have any proven recipes to share ??? Resources for recipes ??
Thanks
xxxxxx
PS
I've also looked at Better World Books, and Amazon CA. Most things are not useful as either geared towards cutie things or unaceptable ingredients.
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Old 02-28-2018, 08:43 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is online now
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Tim, have you searched BHM? There are a number of articles on such things, but I don't know if they suit your needs. Here we have found that canning things separately and combining them to heat up works best for us. For example, we would can common veggies together, celery, and various meats. You can then vary your meals and you don't have to accept whatever sounded good months and months ago. You can add canned or powdered milk, mushroom, fresh stuff you find around, or fresh meat and fish if you have them instead of settling for the canned stuff. We have found this system more flexible than canning or storing things all together. Believe me, we have tons of stuff stored in cans and mylar bags with oxipaks and such, but the regular canned stuff mixed when we eat is going to get used first.
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Old 03-01-2018, 11:01 AM
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I've been wanting to add "add water" meals (that aren't box and proceesed) but it seems those type of recipes call mostly for freeze dried ingredients. Not really opposed to it but really don't have the funds to buy fd ingredients nor do I want to invest in a freeze dryer at this time.

Have you checked out backpackingchef.com?
Not in jars necessarily but could easily be adadpted...or what I've been doing is making buckets with individual meals ready to grab and go.
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Old 03-01-2018, 10:51 PM
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Yes Bean. You are on the right track. 110%.......

Meals that are "add water" without exotic ingredients. Ingredients local grocery available. Homemade ingredients. For instance, imitation bacon bits from the bulk food store or isle of grocery. Not the same as Hormel package bacon bits, but more shelf, long storage stable. And don't taste bad I think.

The idea to store in a glass jar is that is a known quantity, common size for packing in storage boxes. Vermin, bug moisture, cold proof. Known quantity so you can use the jar to measure water to add. Then store water in the jar for the time you are out using this type of meals, but careful of low temperatures. That is some of the advantages of using canning jars in this situation.

Thanks.
Will check out the web pages mentioned.
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Old 03-04-2018, 08:45 PM
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Well they finely drove me nuts...... (short trip)

I'm ticked off and had it with you tube and web articles from people that make "cute" things, people who use uncommon expensive ingredients, and people who make up things that you have to have your home kitchen available to make a meal. That is NOT......NOT.... what I intend with this. Sooooooo...

Made up a recipe and will post it in another thread. Something like "Working Recipes" Meal in a Jar.
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Old 03-04-2018, 09:19 PM
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Default INSTRUCTIONS.....

What ticked me off the most is people who use a 43 minute video to dispense 8 minutes of info. I don't need to know how grandma likes this recipe over that recipe, or how little Suzy at college likes the next recipe... Not ready to record, have to go find the salt, rattle, bang, crash, waste of time finding a favorite spoon... Too much blat, blat, blat. People are nuts...
xxxxxxxxxxx
Read all instructions before continuing. How many times have we seen that ??

Read preparation instructions before beginning. Some may be different than others depending on the meal.

Local ingredients may vary. For instance, make the recipe as close as you can with what is local to you. Try it out. If it needs salt, add salt to your taste. If you only have garlic salt to use, omit extra salt. Use your head.
THAT is a big part of being a prepper. Or far as I'm concerned.

If you can't think around a problem and MUST follow the recipe to a tee. Get someone to help you.

Adapt, improvise, overcome...
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Old 03-06-2018, 05:52 PM
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I think I get what you're saying.

You are looking for recipes that are already portioned out for a pint or quart jar and then you plan to store with that jar a corresponding jar of canned water?

It's a good plan and I'm surprised it really hasn't really been played out, especially if you have available the storage space. It sure would be one less thing to have to think about. It may be that you'll have to play around with the portions and such and create your own recipes.

Vacuum seal your jars or oxygen absorbers? Or both?

Excalibur has a lot of good recipes on their website too. You'd probably have to play with portions to fit your canning jars.

I'll add some of my recipes later...no bow or cute label needed.
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Last edited by Mesquite_Bean; 03-06-2018 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 03-06-2018, 07:36 PM
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Do you have a dehydrator? It seems mine is always running.

Instant oatmeal...
10-12 c. quick cook oatmeal
2 c. brown sugar
2 c. dehydrated shredded apples and/or raisins
1 c. walnut, baking pieces
1 c. dry milk
1 T. apple pie spice
1 tsp. salt

In smallish portions pulse the oatmeal in a few the food processor. (You don't want it flour fine but you need to cut it up a bit).

Portion into 1 c serving size. Cover with boiling water to preferred thickness stir and allow to sit about 5 minutes.

I haven't done it yet but I'm thinking chopped up pumpkin leather and pumpkin spice instead would be tasty.

---------

Vegetable "Meat" Soup...
1 bag frozen mixed veggies, dehydrated
3 T. dried onions
1 T. tomato powder
1 T. dried chopped celery or 1/4 tsp. celery powder
1 t. dried minced garlic
1 bay leaf
salt and pepper
2-3 boullion cubes (vegetable flavor keeps it versatile)

Mix and store.

Cover with boiling water and let sit 30 minutes, add fresh rabbit/chicken/hamburger/stew meat/turkey/whatever. Simmer an hour or two. Could add rice, macaroni, or dumplings towards the end of cooking.

---------

If you haven't already you might want to check out the book The Dehydrator Bible by MacKenzie, Nutt, and Mercer. Not so much the casseroles and baked goods but the soups could very easily be adapted to your plan though you'd possible need more jars of water than jars of ingredients.
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Last edited by Mesquite_Bean; 03-06-2018 at 08:05 PM.
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