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  #1  
Old 03-03-2018, 04:51 PM
steveb steveb is offline
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Default Solar power to solar pump wiring

Hello,
I have a 210-230 ft. well (water level) that I'm using an AC pump. It's time to move to a solar powered version, so I've been looking at various submersible low voltage pumps.

While that part of the research is going well, what I'm not grasping is that with a low voltage power going 23- ft. plus from the panels to the pump down in the bore hole, what sort of wiring gauge should I expect?

My experience with 12v wiring tells me that a possible 3 amp pump at 230 plus feet should be a 6 or 6 gauge wiret...and that is pretty thick! Meaning pricey.

I'm I correct about this, and isn't the cabling something most sellers are not calculating in their cost (and something the buyer is going to have to calculate...before its too late!).

Cheers.
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Old 03-05-2018, 09:27 AM
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12vman Male 12vman is offline
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I would consider 2 Ga. at that distance. You should remember the surge demand as the pump starts, regardless of the soft power on function..

Also, read this sentence real close.. You might reconsider! (One way down and one way back)

"Maximum one-way distance (feet) for 5% voltage loss in 12 volt systems. Wire Size (AWG)"

https://www.12voltsplus.com/wiresizechart
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Last edited by 12vman; 03-05-2018 at 09:39 AM.
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Old 03-05-2018, 03:02 PM
steveb steveb is offline
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Thanks for the reply! Yeah, 2 gauge is thicker still, which supports my issue about lack of wire requirements/size advertised in such deep well systems.

I would make a guess that there is always the chance that I can find a 220v submersible pump for the same length, and use solar panels + batteries + charge controller + inverter. It would still depend on the amp of the pump + the surge aspect as well...which might make the inverter cost such a large cost that buying all that 2 ga. wire for a 12v system actually starts to look cheap!
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Old 03-05-2018, 10:51 PM
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The most logical thought is to get the water to ground level and then pressurize it for use. A submersible pump draws much less current at free flow..

Think having a holding tank at ground level. (Cistern) Pull water from the well with a submersible pump at free flow to fill the ground level storage. (Not Under Pressure) A generator could be used or a solar system if desired. Much less demand on the pump, being it doesn't have to build pressure and will move lots of water in a shorter time. (Hope the well can keep up with the pump.. LOL) Perhaps a 120 V.A.C. @~ 1/2 HP pump could do the job?

A friend of mine does it this way. He has a submersible pump (120 vac/1/2 hp) in his well. Pumps water to a 2000 gal. underground cistern. He runs the pump with a gasoline generator. He fires the genny up, kicks in the pump and watches the overflow line from his storage tank. When water starts flowing from the overflow, he shuts things down. He has an underground line from the storage to his house. He then pressures up the water with a 12 v.d.c. RV pump inside the house. Gives him ~ a month of water.. (With less than a gallon of gas!) Works fine.. Last long time..

To Add..
A farmer told me this a long time ago..

"If you have a stream of water from a small spring about the size of a wheat straw and collect it in a watering though 24/7, you could collect enough water to support 10 head of cattle."

Just some food for thought..
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Last edited by 12vman; 03-05-2018 at 11:02 PM.
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  #5  
Old 03-06-2018, 04:54 PM
steveb steveb is offline
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It's a good thought, and one that I'm halfway using already.

I have a 5,000 liter cistern in which I'm currently pumping with my 220v submersible from the well, using a generator (I get about 1200 liters every 2 hours, and I can pump up that 1200 liters in 27 minutes with the current pump).

The cistern provides pressure and the water holding, obviously, to the land.

I'm just tired of being reliant on gas for the generator. I need about 1200 liters per day in the summer, which the well can easily provide, and I'm hoping a solar 12v could pump up during or over the entire day (since I don't need the 1200 liters at once, but for use throughout the day). And I'm thinking to also or eventually add batteries to the system so the pump could run 24/7 if needed.
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Old 03-12-2018, 12:40 PM
Bones Bones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveb View Post
It's a good thought, and one that I'm halfway using already.

I have a 5,000 liter cistern in which I'm currently pumping with my 220v submersible from the well, using a generator (I get about 1200 liters every 2 hours, and I can pump up that 1200 liters in 27 minutes with the current pump).

The cistern provides pressure and the water holding, obviously, to the land.

I'm just tired of being reliant on gas for the generator. I need about 1200 liters per day in the summer, which the well can easily provide, and I'm hoping a solar 12v could pump up during or over the entire day (since I don't need the 1200 liters at once, but for use throughout the day). And I'm thinking to also or eventually add batteries to the system so the pump could run 24/7 if needed.
How much wind do you have? A windmill might be a solution.

http://www.ironmanwindmill.com/
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  #7  
Old 03-18-2018, 09:49 PM
Lurch Male Lurch is offline
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I'm using a Sureflow 9300 dc submersible well pump, and have been for the past 20 years (the same pump). However, my static water level is almost to the surface. I have the pump sitting at about 50' down. It is wired directly to a 12v battery bank. It fills a cistern in the house, then is pressurized by another Sureflow dc pump for domestic use.
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