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Books/Poetry/Member Fiction Discuss books or poems you've read or post poems or fiction you've written.

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  #161  
Old 08-20-2015, 03:23 PM
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Have gotten into reading novels by Brad Thor and am doing it in order. Have read Lions of Lucerne, Path of the Assassin and am now reading State of the Union.
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  #162  
Old 09-03-2015, 10:29 PM
MtnManJim Male MtnManJim is offline
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I recently read “The Last Stand” by Nathaniel Philbrick. It’s a book about…wait for it…Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn.
I really enjoyed the book and learned that most of the popular myths about Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn are probably just that – myths. As a matter of fact, one inconsequential myth about Custer that I think most of us have seen on TV is that he had long, golden hair. He didn’t – at least not at that time.
I also learned that Custer was probably not the belligerent, insubordinate, self-promoting fool the media has made him out to be. Oh, I’m sure he was all of those things to some degree. But somehow the media always forgets to mention that if it hadn’t been for Custer, the Battle of Gettysburg years earlier could very possibly have turned out entirely different than the way it did.
Anyway, after reading the book I did a little more research on Custer and was astounded to learn that some of the things I’d heard about him since I was a kid, is pure nonsense.
Since reading “The Last Stand,” I’ve read a few of the stories in a book called “The Complete Collection of Short Stories by Ernest Hemingway.” I have to admit, I’d never read anything by Hemingway before because, once again, I believed what I’d heard about him – that he was nothing more than a fatalist.
Well, I was wrong. Sure, Hemingway obviously had his demons. I mean, after all he did put a gun to his head. But after reading just a few of his short stories I now believe that there was much more to the man than someone with a death wish.
I have Kachad, right here on this forum, to thank for my new found enlightenment about Ernest Hemingway. About a month ago Kachad posted that he was reading, “For Whom the Bell Tolls” for the third time. I’ve read many of Kachad’s posts and enjoyed them. Can’t say I ever disagreed with any of them. So when Kachad posted he liked Ernest Hemingway as an author, I bought Hemingway’s book of short stories the very next time we were in a book store.
Kachad – you can use this post as proof that you deserve a commission paid by the Hemingway family if you think it will help.
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  #163  
Old 09-05-2015, 12:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnManJim View Post
I recently read “The Last Stand” by Nathaniel Philbrick. It’s a book about…wait for it…Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn.
I really enjoyed the book and learned that most of the popular myths about Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn are probably just that – myths. As a matter of fact, one inconsequential myth about Custer that I think most of us have seen on TV is that he had long, golden hair. He didn’t – at least not at that time.
I also learned that Custer was probably not the belligerent, insubordinate, self-promoting fool the media has made him out to be. Oh, I’m sure he was all of those things to some degree. But somehow the media always forgets to mention that if it hadn’t been for Custer, the Battle of Gettysburg years earlier could very possibly have turned out entirely different than the way it did.
Anyway, after reading the book I did a little more research on Custer and was astounded to learn that some of the things I’d heard about him since I was a kid, is pure nonsense.
Since reading “The Last Stand,” I’ve read a few of the stories in a book called “The Complete Collection of Short Stories by Ernest Hemingway.” I have to admit, I’d never read anything by Hemingway before because, once again, I believed what I’d heard about him – that he was nothing more than a fatalist.
Well, I was wrong. Sure, Hemingway obviously had his demons. I mean, after all he did put a gun to his head. But after reading just a few of his short stories I now believe that there was much more to the man than someone with a death wish.
I have Kachad, right here on this forum, to thank for my new found enlightenment about Ernest Hemingway. About a month ago Kachad posted that he was reading, “For Whom the Bell Tolls” for the third time. I’ve read many of Kachad’s posts and enjoyed them. Can’t say I ever disagreed with any of them. So when Kachad posted he liked Ernest Hemingway as an author, I bought Hemingway’s book of short stories the very next time we were in a book store.
Kachad – you can use this post as proof that you deserve a commission paid by the Hemingway family if you think it will help.

Do you know George's brother Thonas was also a civ war officer and TWICE won the MEDAl OF HONOR
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  #164  
Old 09-05-2015, 02:19 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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MtnManJim - Hey Man, thank you very much for the compliments!

I'm very glad you went out and purchased Hemmingway's collection of short stories. I loved the Nick Adams character - always wanted to read more stories about that character, but then again, I think there was a lot of Nick in all of his main characters.

I will submit a request to the Hemmingway estate for a commission, but I think we know what that answer will be.

Come to think about it, I may just have to bring up H's short stories with me when I go Up Nord this next week.

I will have to grab "The Last Stand". Let me know if you get a commission from that Author. heh.

Have you been to the Little Bighorn National Monument? If you haven't, and if you have a chance, I highly recommend it. Very spooky and awe inspiring place. I've been there twice - once as a child, then once bringing my child. They have walking trails there that have signage about each encounter that took place.

Each sign describes in great detail the encounter that took place in that location. After reading the sign you look out at the terrain - there are grave markers of every warrior that have been identified as one of the fallen. You can literally see the progression of each encounter based on the location of markers. They have separate markers for Indians and US Soldiers. That's the spooky and awe inspiring part.

If you're interested in other frontier encounters, I would recommend taking a look at "Buried My Heart at Wounded Knee" by Dee Brown. My Father introduced me to this book when I was a kid. I've visited that site a few times too - I have a few distant relatives buried at the graveyard there.

Take Care, Dude!
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  #165  
Old 09-09-2015, 06:38 PM
MtnManJim Male MtnManJim is offline
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My wife and I are hoping to make it over to the Little Big Horn National Monument come Spring. The furthest east we've been in Montana so far has been a trip over to Big Timber a few years back. But after reading that book, now I just have to see the battlefield of the Little Big Horn. With hunting season coming on here, and after that, Winter, it will be Spring before we get over there though.

I AM interested in frontier history, as well as the earlier, mountain man history (hence the moniker I gave myself for this forum, MtnMnJim). I'll need to pick up a copy of that book you recommended - Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee. It sounds like something I'll enjoy.
Thanks,
Jim
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  #166  
Old 09-10-2015, 01:31 AM
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My wife and I are hoping to make it over to the Little Big Horn National Monument come Spring. The furthest east we've been in Montana so far has been a trip over to Big Timber a few years back. But after reading that book, now I just have to see the battlefield of the Little Big Horn. With hunting season coming on here, and after that, Winter, it will be Spring before we get over there though.

I AM interested in frontier history, as well as the earlier, mountain man history (hence the moniker I gave myself for this forum, MtnMnJim). I'll need to pick up a copy of that book you recommended - Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee. It sounds like something I'll enjoy.
Thanks,
Jim
Hunting season has to be a priority, otherwise life just ain't right.

If you like the frontier fiction, check this out:

Battle of Fortune Wells - by Daniel C. Chamberlain

It's a good read, especially between Hunting Season and Spring.
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  #167  
Old 09-10-2015, 02:00 AM
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Am on to Brad Thor's 4th novel, Blow Back.
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  #168  
Old 09-15-2015, 08:52 PM
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Just started Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove." Haven't even finished the first chapter yet and am already liking it better than the TV mini-series.
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  #169  
Old 09-16-2015, 10:10 AM
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Just started Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove." Haven't even finished the first chapter yet and am already liking it better than the TV mini-series.
While Lonesome Dove is probably my favorite movie I enjoyed the book much more. I recently read the whole series over again - kind of neat to start from the beginning (Lonesome Dove is the 3rd of a series of 4 books).

http://www.amazon.com/Lonesome-Dove-.../dp/B003ODJ196

http://www.amazon.com/Larry-McMurtry..._cont_ebooks_1
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  #170  
Old 09-20-2015, 02:30 PM
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While Lonesome Dove is probably my favorite movie I enjoyed the book much more. I recently read the whole series over again - kind of neat to start from the beginning (Lonesome Dove is the 3rd of a series of 4 books).

http://www.amazon.com/Lonesome-Dove-.../dp/B003ODJ196

http://www.amazon.com/Larry-McMurtry..._cont_ebooks_1
OMG. I LOVE Lonesome Dove! I'd love to read them all.

I'm currently reading From The Corner Of His Eye by Dean Koontz. I love his books. I've read a few of them.
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  #171  
Old 09-25-2015, 04:34 PM
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Lincoln's Brown Water Navy about the 7 city class iron ships that controlled the Mississippi in the civil war . Design and built by James B Eads in less than 6 months, a self taught civil engineer who invited the diving bell and later design the first steel bridge completed in 1870's and still in use at St. Louis. His ships along with General Grant enabled the implementation of General Winfield Scott's " anaconda plan " that was the key to winning the war.
I got pulled away from this with some bigger projects and am back on it, I can not tell you how interesting this book is<
If you want to know about
1. Iron clads on both sides.
2. Wood clads
3. " Cotton clads of the south
4. FASTER boats designed to " ram and sink" others
5. a small flotilla of Rams that were neither part of Navy , army or marines.
6. Shallow draft stern wheel "tin" cladding for smaller rivers,
Plus just the history of the navy battles and tactics on the brown water.
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 09-26-2015 at 11:23 AM.
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  #172  
Old 10-07-2015, 07:36 PM
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About 3/4 the way through North and South by John Jakes. I read it probably 30 years ago but am enjoying it immensely - such good writing and a subject that really holds my attention.

Now I am going to have to get the next 2 books in the trilogy.
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  #173  
Old 11-04-2015, 11:40 PM
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Not a book but a movie that may be my favorite of all time.
I go back and watch it every so often to remind my self of what's important.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BEVzQHqmttE
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  #174  
Old 11-05-2015, 11:07 AM
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coaltrain, I loved North and South. Did you watch it when it was on TV (back in the day)?
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  #175  
Old 11-05-2015, 02:33 PM
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coaltrain, I loved North and South. Did you watch it when it was on TV (back in the day)?
I just found out a couple weeks ago that a TV show was made. So then I went searching and could only find it on Amazon instant video and they want $40 for it. As much as I would love to see it after reading the books I won't pay that price.

Just finished up the second book "Love and War" and will be starting the last one "Heaven and Hell" shortly.
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  #176  
Old 11-23-2015, 03:48 PM
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Now reading Puritan Christians in America Religion and Life in Seventeen-Century Massachusetts by Allen Carden

Very good. Interestingly the greatest sin in the Puritans eyes was "hypocracy" which then was a general term to describe the possession of the outward forms of religion without it's true substance .

Heaven only knows what they would think of today's " Christians".

Since Calvin was the beginning I thought it would be interesting to see the changes in doctrine since then. I was forced to skip Knox since my library had to borrow the book and it's not here yet.

Have to admit I did not have the nerve to takle Calvins " institute of Christian Religion" even though I have in my library of the great books of the world.
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 11-24-2015 at 12:09 AM.
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  #177  
Old 11-23-2015, 09:21 PM
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have spent the past three nights with the Devil's Chessboard--a searching look into the brothers Dulles, and what they did to America.

Always knew that there were a lot of CIA/State department shenanigans involved with the VietNam mess. Didn't realize how their manipulation of government was going on well before WWII. Even though long gone, Allen Dulles' legacy lives on in the current mess the world is in today.

JVC
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