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Old 02-13-2015, 04:28 PM
truthseeker53 Male truthseeker53 is offline
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Default Keeping spayed Lab's weight down

Any wisdom on this. Don't need early hip probs, cut back on her food but she's steady begging. Been feeding Fred's Super Dollar's brand food. Don't know who makes it for them but think the cereal content is too high for her. She does runs loose, not pent up.
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Old 02-13-2015, 07:02 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Originally Posted by truthseeker53 View Post
Any wisdom on this. Don't need early hip probs, cut back on her food but she's steady begging. Been feeding Fred's Super Dollar's brand food. Don't know who makes it for them but think the cereal content is too high for her. She does runs loose, not pent up.
Find a better food with meat as the first ingredient, and just accept the fact she's going to beg for a while

You can also get cheap bulk packs of chicken parts and feed her raw meat.

Large (raw) bones with a little meat can occupy her time so she won't be begging so much

Feeding a couple of small portions each day is better than one large serving
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Old 02-14-2015, 11:26 AM
ScrubbieLady ScrubbieLady is offline
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Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Find a better food with meat as the first ingredient, and just accept the fact she's going to beg for a while

You can also get cheap bulk packs of chicken parts and feed her raw meat.

Large (raw) bones with a little meat can occupy her time so she won't be begging so much

Feeding a couple of small portions each day is better than one large serving
Ours has toys to chew on/play with.

The multiple portions is a good idea. And a different dog food with more meat in it. Don't know about the raw meat but we did cook the chicken and add some rice(they need more than just meat) at the vet's instructions when ours was ill.
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Old 02-14-2015, 04:11 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Don't know about the raw meat but we did cook the chicken and add some rice(they need more than just meat) at the vet's instructions when ours was ill.
If you cook chicken with the bones in, they can splinter in a manner that can cause the dogs to choke

Raw bones tend to break in much smaller pieces

If the bones are large enough they can't swallow them, it doesn't matter as much

Some folks with lots of dogs raise rabbits to help feed them, and mine would practically live on deer meat during hunting season

Check out the "BARF" diet for more info

(BARF = Bones and raw foods, or Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raw_feeding
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:23 PM
ScrubbieLady ScrubbieLady is offline
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When I feed chicken to my dogs, I cook and then de-bone.
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Old 02-16-2015, 12:19 AM
truthseeker53 Male truthseeker53 is offline
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Thanx y'all.
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Old 02-16-2015, 11:33 PM
Sugarfoot Sugarfoot is offline
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Whats a labs life expectance? Is it a real problem? I mean it would seem it is thier only great pleasure unless they like spending hours chasing a frisby.
I know how your dog feels.
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Old 02-17-2015, 06:03 AM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Whats a labs life expectance?
Is it a real problem?
Larger breeds have shorter lifespans
A Lab averages 10-12 years

Hip Dysplasia is a genetic disease common in some large breeds, and being overweight will aggravate the condition, causeig them a lot of pain and loss of mobility

It's also worsened by too much strenuous excercise before they are fully grown, which takes 1.5-2 years
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Old 02-20-2015, 09:31 PM
CountryMom22 Female CountryMom22 is offline
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Another thing you can try: if you feel that she really is hungry, instead of biscuits offer her raw baby carrots as a treat. My Lab loves them. Our dog came to us at about 9-12 months old. Unbeknowst to us, he has a pin in his leg from some earlier injury. Our vet suggested keeping his weight down to prevent potential problems later on down the road. As I'm sure you know, it is easier to keep the weight off of a dog than it is to remove it once it gets there. Some dogs are real beggars (mine included, which is totally my fault) so cutting back on the kibble and adding in fresh veggies really seems to help fill them up. Most important is a good quality dog food with real meat as the first ingredient and carefully watching the portion control. Also, go with a low calorie or light dog food unless your dog is super active or working.

Best of luck, with their adorable faces, our furry friends can be hard to say no to!
Sue
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Old 02-20-2015, 10:17 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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I agree with feeding a higher quality kibble. WalMart sells a grain-free kibble at a surprisingly decent price. It might see more expensive but remember, you're feeding a lot less and the dog will feel less hungry. Also, loose stools are NOT good. A dog needs a firm stool to express their anal glands otherwise the glands become infected and you'll have to express them by hand (yuck!)

My last old dog was a flat-hair retriever. He lived to the age of 14 years old and had no health problems. In the morning he'd get scrambled eggs, then free-feed kibble and water all day, then selective table scraps at dinner. The only time he got fat was when I decided I needed to feed him all home-cooked food (rice, eggs, de-boned chicken). While he loved it, I realized he was eating far too much and went back to the free-feed kibble.

My two puppies (over the age of 1 but still young) are eating the same diet and are not at all fat. I'm gluten-free and so are my animals. Once we stopped allowing them to gave wheat in any form and severely limited corn, the dog-fart problem went away as did all stomach issues.
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