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  #41  
Old 09-27-2018, 05:44 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Sir Percy.

He is a Speckled Sussex rooster: a dual purpose chicken who's breed dates back to the Roman era. Practically speaking, he is a short solid chicken with (in this case) long curved spurs. Well they curved out a bit and it did not bother the hens any, so I just made a mental note to cut those spurs when I got around to it.

Mistake!

I went to let them out one morning and Sir Percy was hanging upside down from one long, curved spur! I have no idea how long he was hanging from the roost like that but when I let him down he could not move that leg or get up.

I was sure he was a goner but I let him rest with a dish of water while I went in to think on this a bit and to ask on a fairly lively poultry forum. Most people suggested a "wait and see" approach.

Well by the afternoon he was up on his good leg and moving the injured leg with ease, though he would not put weight on it.

That was 3 days ago and I am glad to say that Sir Percy is now limping around the run with the other chickens. He is not putting very much weight on that leg but he can use his strong leg to hop up whenever he wants to go into the hen house.

He is able to take care of himself, which is good. There is no guarantee that the leg does not have damage that isn't showing, but right now it looks like he will likely recover.

I never would have thought that a long spur would put a rooster at risk, but apparently this has happened to other roosters. Sir Percy now has SHORT spurs, of course!

Glad he appears to be healing, Terri. I have never had that problem with any rooster, but I did find a hen hanging upside down from the fence once. I assumed she was fleeing a predator and got hung up. There was a rooster with her and he was a little bloodied, so there much have been a fight, but we never found what caused the ruckus or killed the hen.
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  #42  
Old 09-29-2018, 01:11 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is online now
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Cool and damp the last couple days. Yesterday made it to the low 50s, but with clouds and light rain that was it. Finally had to turn the electric baseboard heaters on in the house. With overnight lows in the low 40s and no sun for a couple days with temps in the 50s, it was either the baseboards heaters to take the chill off in the house, or start the wood stove. Baseboards were easier.

Did manage to get some of the wood I'd cut up hauled to the barn and stacked away before the wet weather got here. I'm thinking next week I need to start on the big logs out behind my house. I'll borrow my son in laws saw to cut them up since his saw has a 20" bar. The logs with no bark on them are about that size, and I hate having to go at them from both sides with my saw that has a 16" bar, too much work.

I'm just trying to decide if I want to cut them up and then bring my splitter to them, or do I want to pick up the logs and set them just inside my tractor shed before I cut them up. I figure the cut sections are going to be heavy enough I don't want to have to handle them any more then I have to. In the end it would probably be easier to just cut them and then bring the splitter out to them, but that would also mean I have to do a lot of splitting all at once. I kind of prefer to have the wood under cover and split some as I go.
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  #43  
Old 09-29-2018, 05:57 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Hunter, isn't it easier to move the logs intact instead of a bunch of split pieces if you use the tractor? I find it to be so. I then can cut and split the wood where it will be stacked (or piled if I am lazy).
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  #44  
Old 09-29-2018, 06:08 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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Hunter, isn't it easier to move the logs intact instead of a bunch of split pieces if you use the tractor? I find it to be so. I then can cut and split the wood where it will be stacked (or piled if I am lazy).
In a pinch a riding mower will move a log if it is not too heavy. My trees are not wide enough to need a splitter, but my riding mower will easily move a 30 foot tree. And if the log is too heavy you could cut the log into lengths and drag them into position.
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  #45  
Old 09-29-2018, 06:38 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Bright, sunny, windy, cooler... High today of 6C. Ten day forecast of 5-8C highs, -1 to -5 lows. No moisture forecast so far.

Into town today early for the "Junk in the Trunk" sale. Always cold and windy for that event. Sweetie only spent about $5. I spent 0..... A few small things were of interest, but not enough to spend $....

The big Mennonite church in town had there Fall Festival. A good lunch. Wonderful bake sale. Apples, veggies, fresh cider, and such.

Yesterday we finished digging potatoes. Got a nice heaping garden wagon full of mostly reds and a few hills of Yukon Gold. Picked onions. Reds and whites were not much more than golf ball size at most. Yellows were tennis ball size. Obviously this summer was tough on them. Now a generous layer in all the raised containers of rabbit or donkey barn and a layer of (city, real cheap) compost and done for the winter.

We are at about 80-90% leaf color now, with about 20-30% leaf fall. Pretty when they blow out on the road and driveway in swirls and patterns. This can be a danger if not paying attention. When the leaves get wet on pavement it can be as slick as ice.

Depending on the situation many times I like to cut firewood into stove length where it falls. If it is easy to do, it is easy to move short lengths rather than skid long wood at times. Also not skidding keeps wood cleaner and less ware on saw chains.

Now that this got brought up..... It is getting me to think about building a 4 wheel skidding dolly for bringing timber out in longer lengths. A 4 wheel dolly with a V arm bunk to hold the tail end of logs out of the dirt, and lifting the front ends with the tractor 3pt. Will have to work on designing that this winter.

Also thinking about building a combination type stone boat/wagon on skids to use for stove length wood to bring it out of the bush to the splitter and the shed.

You got me to thinking now.... This could be dangerous...
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  #46  
Old 09-29-2018, 08:32 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is online now
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Hunter, isn't it easier to move the logs intact instead of a bunch of split pieces if you use the tractor? I find it to be so. I then can cut and split the wood where it will be stacked (or piled if I am lazy).
Yeah it would be easier to move the logs, and I'd put the set of forks on the JD 3020 so I could do that. But if I knew I'd have a string of dry weather I could cut them where they are, and then using the tractor and forks set an oversized pallet near them. the pallet I made is 8' long and can hold over a pickup load of split wood. I could split there and not have to stack the cut pieces of wood in the shed. It would reduce handling a little, but then as I said I have to do a bunch of splitting at once.

So in the end I'll probably pick up the logs and cut them where I'm going to stack them. The openings for the shed are 10' and a couple of logs are longer then that, but I think I can get them just inside to cut.

You know the cord I bought for $300 was a lot easier.

But then it cost a lot too.
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  #47  
Old 09-29-2018, 10:05 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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This week my husband made me door frames for my home made greenhouse. Just the frames, so that I can cover them with plastic and let the light shine through.

Nothing bought would fit them-I looked- so he made them. Only, he assumed that the entry was square and it is not.

See, that was the second thing that I had ever built and I had not yet realized that no matter how many times that I measured before I cut that it would not be square. I am LIMITED that way. Now I would compensate by using the corner of a sheet of plywood to make sure things were square but I had not yet realized that I was so limited! And, when my Father came out he said it hurt his eyes it was so crooked and he helped me straighten it and brace it so that it stayed that way but it is still not really square and it never will be.

So, anyways, the doorways were not square but the doors that DH made WERE square. Of course they did not fit and so he spent hours planing and trimming and such. And tonight all 4 doors are on.

On the good side that was roughly 30 years ago that I built it and it is still standing. It does show signs of decay in spots but it looks like it will be good for a few more years of use, and by the time it dies I expect that will no longer be working in the greenhouse. Age and illnesses happens to us all.

Tomorrow if the weather holds I will paint the doors and cover them with greenhouse covering.
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  #48  
Old 09-30-2018, 03:44 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Tim, our low temps are about the same as yours, but our daytime highs are warmer. I only skid logs when I can't get them out any other way. Most often I cut them in lengths and move hem with the tractor bucket to a convenient location where they can be cut and split.

Terri, I have built a few greenhouses, and our biggest is slowly deteriorating, but, as you, it may last until we are no longer able to use it. I told my brother that I may tear it down and rebuild it smaller so it will be easier to tend and heat if needed.
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  #49  
Old 09-30-2018, 03:52 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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Tim, our low temps are about the same as yours, but our daytime highs are warmer. I only skid logs when I can't get them out any other way. Most often I cut them in lengths and move hem with the tractor bucket to a convenient location where they can be cut and split.

Terri, I have built a few greenhouses, and our biggest is slowly deteriorating, but, as you, it may last until we are no longer able to use it. I told my brother that I may tear it down and rebuild it smaller so it will be easier to tend and heat if needed.
Don, what do you use to heat your greenhouses? I have never been satisfied with my attempts as the plants either get cold if far away or dry out if they are too close. And nothing I have cobbled up wants to run at all when it gets VERY cold.

Mostly I cover my growing beds with 3 additional layers of clear plastic when it is cold, peel the covers back when it warms up and accept that the Gardening year is over some time in December.
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  #50  
Old 09-30-2018, 05:04 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is online now
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Well wet again today, and it appears tomorrow will be the same. Plus late next week more of the same. So I decided I better get my logs under cover so I can cut them up. I have four logs total to move, but I decided to just put two under cover for now, then when I get them cut and stacked to the side, I can bring the other logs inside too.

It was a little interesting getting 12' to 13' logs through a 10' opening. But I found if I came at it from an angle, got one end inside the post, then cut the front end hard I could slip them inside.

The wood stacked up in the back is the oak I got when my sister had trimmers take some branches off a couple of her oak trees. The stack goes down two walls in the corner, so totally there is a stack about 15' long and 5' high. Not bad for just some branches trimmed off a couple trees.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/TE8eEh2UMbC2fYrWA

https://photos.app.goo.gl/SAfPGoYSmjkKGGLc9
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  #51  
Old 09-30-2018, 08:16 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Don, what do you use to heat your greenhouses? I have never been satisfied with my attempts as the plants either get cold if far away or dry out if they are too close. And nothing I have cobbled up wants to run at all when it gets VERY cold.

Mostly I cover my growing beds with 3 additional layers of clear plastic when it is cold, peel the covers back when it warms up and accept that the Gardening year is over some time in December.

Our big greenhouse is heated with a wood stove, but we have shut that down as it is quite a hassle to keep the fire going when it gets too cold. It my new little greenhouse, I have a small electric heater that I have set for 45 F., so it only comes on when the temp is below that. I added it to the back wall of our old milking shed, since I have power galore there and could run a big electric heater if I wished. I have also used incandescent lights plugged into a thermocube. Our attached greenhouse stays going the longest, and sometimes most of the winter, as I have a heater there, and there is a man-door that opens from the heated garage, which is heated by natural gas. It gets quite warm in there from the sun, and sometimes contributes heat to the house and garage in the spring as the days get longer.
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  #52  
Old 09-30-2018, 08:18 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Well wet again today, and it appears tomorrow will be the same. Plus late next week more of the same. So I decided I better get my logs under cover so I can cut them up. I have four logs total to move, but I decided to just put two under cover for now, then when I get them cut and stacked to the side, I can bring the other logs inside too.

It was a little interesting getting 12' to 13' logs through a 10' opening. But I found if I came at it from an angle, got one end inside the post, then cut the front end hard I could slip them inside.

The wood stacked up in the back is the oak I got when my sister had trimmers take some branches off a couple of her oak trees. The stack goes down two walls in the corner, so totally there is a stack about 15' long and 5' high. Not bad for just some branches trimmed off a couple trees.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/TE8eEh2UMbC2fYrWA

https://photos.app.goo.gl/SAfPGoYSmjkKGGLc9

Good job, Hunter!
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  #53  
Old 09-30-2018, 08:45 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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Our big greenhouse is heated with a wood stove, but we have shut that down as it is quite a hassle to keep the fire going when it gets too cold. It my new little greenhouse, I have a small electric heater that I have set for 45 F., so it only comes on when the temp is below that.
Every electric heater I have tried has shut itself off when it gets cold: I think it is a safety measure as they all do it. Is your a particular brand or type?
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  #54  
Old 10-01-2018, 01:12 AM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Sunny and cold today. There was ice on the outside dog dish all day today. That is a tell tale sign here in the bush.

Had a good laugh today. MIL called to say the grass had a skiff of "trouble" She wouldn't use the word snow. Mountain pass adjacent to them has snow on the pavement.

Busy cleaning out the garage stall where I did projects all summer. Quite a pile of stuff as I was in the habit of getting stuff out to do something and putting nothing away at the time. All my fault. Need the room to pull vehicles in and change to studded winter tires.

Next ten day forecast is for the same as today. Tis the season. And tomorrow is a new calendar page.....
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  #55  
Old 10-01-2018, 06:46 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Every electric heater I have tried has shut itself off when it gets cold: I think it is a safety measure as they all do it. Is your a particular brand or type?

What good would a heater be if it shut off when it got cold? So the heat works great when it is 80 F. but shuts off at 20 F.? It is just and old milk-house style heater that I got at a garge sale, but it works fine so far.
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Old 10-01-2018, 06:49 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Sunny and cold today. There was ice on the outside dog dish all day today. That is a tell tale sign here in the bush.

Had a good laugh today. MIL called to say the grass had a skiff of "trouble" She wouldn't use the word snow. Mountain pass adjacent to them has snow on the pavement.

Busy cleaning out the garage stall where I did projects all summer. Quite a pile of stuff as I was in the habit of getting stuff out to do something and putting nothing away at the time. All my fault. Need the room to pull vehicles in and change to studded winter tires.

Next ten day forecast is for the same as today. Tis the season. And tomorrow is a new calendar page.....

Ice on the windshields this morning and it is below freezing already at midnight. The sky is clear, so it will be chilly tonight. I have to get the tires changed on the wife's car soon, too. MY old truck just runs the same tires year-round.
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  #57  
Old 10-01-2018, 11:39 AM
hunter88 hunter88 is online now
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I have to get the tires changed on the wife's car soon, too. MY old truck just runs the same tires year-round.
Bought some new tires for my Jeep last month from my local mechanic. He asked if I was sure I wanted the tires I picked out, they didn't have a very aggressive tread, and he knew what the roads where like out where I lived.

I told him they would be ok, I was at the age if the roads were that bad I didn't have to go to work, so I wouldn't be going anywhere, and I still had my truck if I did have to get to town for something.

Wonder how many years it's been since I've actually owned a pair of snow tires that were only used in the winter. Of course having driven 4 wheel drive almost exclusively since the 70s probably has something to do with that.
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  #58  
Old 10-01-2018, 02:57 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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What good would a heater be if it shut off when it got cold? So the heat works great when it is 80 F. but shuts off at 20 F.? It is just and old milk-house style heater that I got at a garge sale, but it works fine so far.
Exactly so.

I use space heaters and apparently the heater you have was meant for sterner weather. That is why my gardening year ends in December. Growing plants can be covered against a frost but there is a limit.

I am not doing anything interesting today: mostly I have an eye appointment and I am dehydrating apples. They were on sale for 50 cents a pound, which is rare, and so I bought 30 pounds and my dehydrator is VERY full!
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  #59  
Old 10-02-2018, 04:50 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Terri, check out garage sales and thrift stores to see if you can get a little heater that will work for you, or just use an incandescent light or brooder lamp on a thermocube to ward off the frost.
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  #60  
Old 10-02-2018, 02:03 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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Terri, check out garage sales and thrift stores to see if you can get a little heater that will work for you, or just use an incandescent light or brooder lamp on a thermocube to ward off the frost.
I might try that with a light

I had never heard of thermocubes until this conversation: they look highly interesting.
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