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  #1  
Old 05-20-2018, 12:29 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Default A water tank to a "leaky hose"?

I would like to set up an automatic garden waterer at a property out of town. I was thinking that a water tank that is attached to a "leaky hose" might work, but since the water tank I would prefer to use will only hold about 30 gallons the pressure might not be great enough to make the hose "leak" all along it's length.

How can I figure out if the water pressure will be great enough?
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Old 05-20-2018, 04:07 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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It doesn't take much pressure to make a "leaky hose" work. If you make your own, however, you have to size the holes so the water reaches the end of the hose run. Not really easy unless you have some kind of plan.
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Old 05-20-2018, 05:06 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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I know too much.

I have too much data in my head to be able to find anything in my head very quickly.

Why ELSE would I forget that I have a soaker hose in the home made greenhouse? (That is a rhetorical question, please do NOT give an answer as to why else I might not have remembered owning a soaker hose).

I figure a soaker hose is similar to a leaky hose.

So. 5 minutes later I knew that with a drop of 2.5 feet (the tailgate of the pickup) it takes the pressure of OVER 5 gallons of water to make a soaker hose work, At 5 gallons the soaker hose shuts off.

Do you folks think that if I put a tank higher on the hill and put an ordinary hose between the tank and the leaky hose (or a soaker hose, I am flexible there) that it would increase or decrease the water pressure in the leaky hose?

Last edited by Terri; 05-21-2018 at 09:20 PM.
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Old 05-21-2018, 06:52 PM
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I'm confused as to the nature of the problem-- do you need an automatic watering system because the garden is in a remote, infrequently visited site but has a convenient water source, or do you have to carry in the water?

Water pressure is governed by the height of the water column, not the volume of the container.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:28 PM
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A soaker hose will waste a lot of water unless your plants are very closely spaced.

I think you'd be better off to use a "drip" hose which only applies water to each plant instead of wetting the entire length of the hose.

I'm assuming this is for your trees.

I'd get some cheap plastic irrigation hose and drill small holes as needed for each tree. Through experimentation you can vary the size of the holes to get the needed flow to each one.

Pressure isn't determined by the size of the container as much as it is by the height above the outlet.

It would also be a good idea to have a filter at the tank outlet to keep debris from blocking the holes.

https://www.bing.com/search?q=drip+i...96C89AD2BC8EBB
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:17 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Well, GOOD!

Height I can do. Height is easy.

Yes, there is a creek but it is kind of hard for me to get up and down to the edge of the creek, now, and I have decided that hauling water in is easier.

Next year I will plant my trees, but this year I am doing some test planting to check out the watering system. So I will set up the waterer for trees this year and test the system out with a lot of leftover vegetable seeds. That should both get me good at using the water system and also test it out on a variety of useful plants. OK I threw in a few new corn seeds, just because I could, but the main goal is to get the waterer set up and tested.

I think that people are right about using drip emitters for the trees, though. I will work this summer to get that set up. And, since I do not visit the property every day, I will test it with older vegetable seeds. If the vegetables survive, then the trees should survive also.
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Old 05-22-2018, 10:54 PM
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one thing I discovered using a gravity feed watering system---if the hose (or pipe) is not level, or runs up and down grade, the water will accumulate at the lowest points instead of a uniform spread. I was using 1/2 inch PVC with 1/8 or 3/16 holes drilled at about 1 foot centers. Also (I guess this makes 2 things) gravity feed did not seem to create enough pressure to use those new black soaker hoses that ooze water along the entire length. My storage tank is 3000 gal about 12 foot tall, and sits on a platform about 3-4 foot above the garden level


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Old 05-23-2018, 12:43 AM
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A detail that may help.....

For every 1ft 4inch height will create 1lb of water pressure.

So for instance... If you have the lowest opening in your water tank approximately 7ft above the level where it connects to your soaker hose it will provide about 5lb of pressure. It will maintain that pressure regardless if there is one bucket or 1000 buckets of water in the tank.

It also does not matter how many solid garden hoses you need to use to move the water from the tank to the soaker. The key is how high the source is above the point of use. How far apart they are is relatively unimportant.
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Old 05-23-2018, 08:20 AM
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Terri- as JVC & Tim have stated, you won't get much pressure out of a tank just 3 ft above ground (typical house plumbing has ~20ft of head, for comparison)--so a soaker hose may not work and setting up a DIY hose or PVC pipe system with holes drilled at specific spots will be time consuming and may need some trial and error testing (ie- make mistakes and start over) before you get it right....then even at that, it may take some time for a 30 gal tank to empty.... you may do better by just draining the tank thru a hand held hose, one plant at a time.
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:51 PM
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I sent a message to a drip irrigation company, asking them how many pounds of pressure would be needed for their emitter to drip properly.

And, getting more "fall" is as simple as getting a longer hose and putting the storage water barrel or tank further away.
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Old 05-24-2018, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terri View Post
I sent a message to a drip irrigation company, asking them how many pounds of pressure would be needed for their emitter to drip properly.

And, getting more "fall" is as simple as getting a longer hose and putting the storage water barrel or tank further away.
Yes... I believe you are on the right track. Knowing the pressure needed, will determine the height the source needs to be above the use point.

I'm going to presume your tank "further away" means higher up the hill, and coincidentally further from the use point. It is all about crunching the numbers.

I also am curious how much pressure to make the hose work, please post the info you get on that.

Please be sure to follow up if it does or doesn't work.
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Old 05-24-2018, 10:24 PM
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seems to me that I saw an ad for drip emitters made specifically for gravity flow systems. Don't recall if a specific head was needed or not. Will try to find again
JVC
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Old 05-25-2018, 03:28 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvcstone View Post
seems to me that I saw an ad for drip emitters made specifically for gravity flow systems. Don't recall if a specific head was needed or not. Will try to find again
JVC
I will do a google search for low-pressure emitters.

In the mean time, Rainbird says they need 30 pounds of pressure for their emitters. At 1 foot 4 inches fall for a pound of pressure, that is a fall of 30 feet plus 120 inches (or 10 feet) for a total of a drop of 40 feet from the road to the chosen spot.

Also each gallon weight 8.6 pounds and so the size of the tank will increase the pressure. I was thinking of a 55 gallon tank.

Question: since a gallon of water weights 8.6 pounds, would that mean that each gallon of water will add 8.6 pounds of water pressure? Because I do not think that I have 40 feet of fall between the road (which is the highest point) and the spot I wish to plant the trees at.

If I assume that I have half of the needed drop, and I will take a wild guess of 20 feet. then just 2 gallons of water would make the emmitters work, so if I use a 55 gallon tank that means it would deliver up to 53 gallons of water to the drip emmiters MINUS the amount of water that is below the spigot.

More or less.

I would be happy with a 55 gallon tank delivering 44 gallons of water over a number of days, so that I do not have to make frequent trips out to the property. I prefer to visit weekly, at most, as life happens.
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Old 05-25-2018, 04:27 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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It looks like I need a "flag emitter" or a "take apart emitter".
https://www.irrigationtutorials.com/...el-irrigation/

Since Rainbird says their emitters need 30 pounds of pressure, I will assume that their emitters are not "flag emitters" or "take apart" emitters. So I have asked "drip works" how many pounds of pressure their emitters require. I am hopeful they can give me some good numbers, as they have a solar timer that is meant for barrel irrigation systems. If they come back with some good numbers I will probably order their catalogue, as I did not see any on-line catalogue for them
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Old 05-25-2018, 06:28 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Dripworks says they have emitters that will work down to 4 PSI. So I am downloading their catalogue. https://www.dripworks.com/media/wysi...018_Retail.pdf

And, this project will have to go on hold because I will just be too busy during the next 4 weeks. And, I want to give this project my undivided attention.
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Old 05-26-2018, 01:11 AM
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Also each gallon weight 8.6 pounds and so the size of the tank will increase the pressure. I was thinking of a 55 gallon tank.
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The weight of the total amount of water you have at the top (to create "head" pressure) does not count.

For instance. If the tank is about 7' high, it produces about 5 lb pressure. It does not matter if the tank is 5 gallon or 1000 gallon. The 5 gallon tank won't drip as long.
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I kinda/sorta remember someone making a drip system of sorts out of very stiff plastic pipe running over multiple adjacent raised beds?? They drilling a 1/16" hole over each plant container and I think they used a 55 gal drum as a water container. They filled the drum, opened the valve to the drilled pipe and let it drain. When it was empty, they shut valve and refilled drum. It put water in each plant container in general, not necessarily each plant individually. But better than dispensing all by hand.
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