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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Conversations

Conversations Pass the time with friends and neighbors. Bring your own coffee.
Please, no Political and/or Current Events posts not directly related to homesteading.

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  #1  
Old 08-23-2008, 01:30 PM
greeott greeott is offline
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Default Michigan law and liquid manure question

Can anyone tell me if farmers ( In Michigan) can only put on liquid manure on a field only a certain amount, or can they dump as thick and as much as they want? I live next to a field and now they are putting on the liquid manure. One year , they did it so thick, you felt as though you were going to pass out just going to get the mail. I was curious if they are allowed to dump as much as they want.
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  #2  
Old 08-23-2008, 01:55 PM
sawyerob sawyerob is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Quote:
Originally Posted by greeott
Can anyone tell me if farmers ( In Michigan) can only put on liquid manure on a field only a certain amount, or can they dump as thick and as much as they want? I live next to a field and now they are putting on the liquid manure. One year , they did it so thick, you felt as though you were going to pass out just going to get the mail. I was curious if they are allowed to dump as much as they want.
Provided it's not running off the field and getting into streams ect.. I don't know of any limits. I put on as much as i want.

Michigan is a "farming" state, if the stink is too bad, perhaps you would be better off heading back to ? the city? We all know how wonderfull the big cities smell.. lol

Ooooh yea, welcome to the board. lol

SR
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  #3  
Old 08-23-2008, 02:22 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

I wish I had some of that liquid manure. I guess it is not every day that the farmers spread it. I know just what you mean, I hung out laundry, went to the store, when i came back the field next to our house was manured and I had to rewash the laundry, it had this natural smell to it.
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  #4  
Old 08-23-2008, 02:51 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Greott, welcome to the forum.

There is a web site that you might find interesting, about the mega-farms that dispose of their manure as you describe:

http://www.mythinglinks.org/FactoryFarms_Michigan.html

Proper farming procedures don't "pour on unlimited liquid manure." If it's a farmer who is interested in ammending his soil, it's a whole different process from that of a big-business that confines huge numbers of cattle, then merely dumps their waste in a parody of fertilizing the soil as a quick & cheap way to get rid of it.

That last practice is what taints ground water and streams. They don't care about the quality of the soil, the water they pollute, or the quality of the beef they produce, for that matter. The goal is dollars, nothing more, nothing less.

I grew up next door to a family farm. I've got to admit there were days when it was mighty sniffy! But it was never eye-watering foul, either. (You know you're country bred when you can identify the animals being raised by the scent of it's manure pile!!) ;D
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  #5  
Old 08-23-2008, 03:33 PM
Buck Buck is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

To much manure will "burn" the crops so farmer know when
to spread it elsewhere and in what amounts.
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  #6  
Old 08-23-2008, 05:17 PM
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madmac madmac is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

I can tell you how to make it and then you could have manure wars, LOL. OK that probably wasn't funny.
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  #7  
Old 08-23-2008, 05:31 PM
MooseToo MooseToo is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormom
I wish I had some of that liquid manure. *
shortly there will be an overabundance of manure in denver -
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  #8  
Old 08-23-2008, 11:04 PM
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Catalpa Catalpa is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

LOL, Moose. ;D

Yes, there are laws about how much manure can be spread per acre. There are also laws about how quickly it must be incorporated after it is spread. With that said, compliance is largely voluntary....the MDA folks are just as understaffed and overworked as the other inspectors.

Carol is right, there are farms, and then there are farms. Some of the big CAFOs just don't give a rip. And yes, you can tell what's going on at a farm just by the smell. Animals at the CAFOs are often stressed, and the manure gets that extra sour smell too it, like when a calf has the scours. Healthy animals will just have the normal manure smell. May sound silly, but trust me, there is a difference.

greeott, you didn't say where in Michigan you were, but 'round here the manure smell is more noticible because they just got all the wheat off. Once the straw is baled and hauled off, they generally start emptying the slurry pits and spreading it on the fields. For the most part, it's not bad, just a little smelly for a ccouple of days until they get it plowed in. If your neighbor has put it on too thickly, to where it's running off and getting into the ditches, you can file a complaint by calling your local MDA office.
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  #9  
Old 08-24-2008, 02:41 AM
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leera leera is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

I'm sure if you do some searching in the Michigan government web site,you'll find some info on manure.......

But,the smell goes away as soon as they work up the field again.......or it will fade away sooner or later.

What part of the state are you in?

I've never seen farmers around here spreading liquid manure,just plain old cow poo with a manure spreader......but then again I live in the heart of a farming area.
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  #10  
Old 08-24-2008, 02:49 AM
cinok Male cinok is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Sounds like somebody who wants to likve in country but wants those big city smells. Just remember that sweet smell is money
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  #11  
Old 08-24-2008, 03:17 AM
whippersnapper whippersnapper is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

I live 3/4's of a mile downwind of a huge dairy farm. When they are spreading, it is 12 hours non stop back and forth by the house. They have 2 semi tanker trucks as well as a couple of the huge balloon tire tractors with the attached spreaders. There isn't 5 minutes between rumblings by. Smell? It is a chemicalish nasty smell that will contaminate everything. Not your typical sweet cow shit smell.

Don't jump on the poster too quick because if he is in a similar situation it is far from pleasant. Don't know about the other large commercial farms, but there goal is to get rid of it as fast as possible and their not too worried about anything else.
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  #12  
Old 08-24-2008, 03:22 AM
cinok Male cinok is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

I didnt mean to jump on the poster sorry if it seemed like that.
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  #13  
Old 08-24-2008, 11:05 AM
sawyerob sawyerob is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

I live just a few miles from the largest dairy in Mi., just to the SW of me is the second largest, and there's several other around too.

The big dairys create more nure than they can spread on there fields, so they are happy to find fields to spread on. Yes it stinks, yes it's part of farming... And they do require a soil sample so they know how much they are putting on. If your soil is run down, your going to get a bunch of it, but remember, it's mostly water so the ground can stand a bunch of it, just so it isn't running off the fields. They even irriagte with it here...

In this area, we are NOT required to till it in or inject it. I've never heard one farmer around here complain about the smell, but the townies do at times.

SR
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  #14  
Old 08-24-2008, 01:56 PM
greeott greeott is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Hi Everyone,
First off, let me say I am a country girl. I am used to all kinds of country smells, some are actually good. But when I posted, I asked that question, because the farmer one year did a double dump, he would pour on this liquid manure, on one row, several times, making it very thick. The smell was beyound terrible. I even had people come to the house getting sick just coming from the car to my house. The gasses we actually buring the eyes and lungs. It was terrible beyound words. He was pouring on this manure next to a huge drainage ditch that drains right to the bay. He admitted to my husband, oh so you live right next to the field we bombed. I was afraid they would try that again, but after they poured one one layer, they worked it in right away. so today I am even able to open windows. *Yes, the trucks are non stop too when they do that. *Thanks for your posts.

I wish farmers would go back to just using manure spreaders, you know the kind that flings the chunky stuff. Gosh, for that matter, why not make huge heaps of it, let it age for a year or two and sell bags of cow manure??? Seems like a neat idea to make money even on the animals manure. People would come with trucks to get the brown gold. But then again, I am not a farmer, and I have no idea if this is even a good idea. But I do know, when the county offers mulch from leaves picked *up and composted, they have a lot of people coming to get it.
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  #15  
Old 08-24-2008, 02:29 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Since they're making slurry anyway, why not put it in a biogas digester and create methane power? Farms in other countries do it (maybe here too?) - and they can run a village from the methane gas. What they end up after it has been through the digester is a much better fertilizer, too, so everybody gains some good out of it. It's just so short sighted to "bomb" a field - and our ground water and the air, too, for that matter. It's a waste of natural resources all the way around.
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  #16  
Old 08-24-2008, 08:59 PM
walls0stone walls0stone is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

ah' the smell of Pasture Pudd'n

Yes Carolann they do that here in the US. It's costly on a milk check budget, but we won't go into money talk. Some towns are not talking about the same concept with sew plants in towns and cities that would off set the electric used by town utility companies. YOu've said the police staion, cort house and other city buildings in your town are full of S***, well now they can run on it. ;D
A plan I saw in my area, also would feed the left over compost, mixed with town lawn waste, tree trimmings ect.. and feed it to red wigglers worm, thuss they would create a markettable good, (using low level prisoners for labor)

make worm castings, raise and sell worms and ellectric hHHMM sounds smart. eh?

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  #17  
Old 08-24-2008, 10:23 PM
DaleK DaleK is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

THere are some methane digesters going in here, and there will be more. For most farms, it's prohibitively expensive. By the time you meet all the red tape, environmental studies, grid capacity studies, etc. etc. etc. it's not at all unusual to have several million$ spent for a larger dairy before they ever put a shovel in the ground on a digester. THen it depends on how the local utility is to work with. I've seen some where the farm can only get a 10 year contract to supply electricity... but at the price they're being paid it'll take 15-20 years to pay the construction costs back. Some places whatever extra electricity goes back into the grid isn't paid for at all, it's just up to the farm to supply it for free.
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  #18  
Old 08-24-2008, 11:25 PM
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

Quote:
Originally Posted by leera
I'm sure if you do some searching in the Michigan government web site,you'll find some info on manure........
The government is well known for spreading manure, everyone knows that. ;D
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  #19  
Old 08-24-2008, 11:29 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Default Re: Michigan law and liquid manure question

interesting and good discussion. Looks to me like red tape is a major trouble. I remember in the early eighties a farmer in North Germany made himself a digester and heated and cooked with the gas. The government made him dismantle it and fined him. (I guess so other farmers would not get ideas).
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