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Go Back   BHM Forum > Self-Reliance & Preparedness > Self-reliance > Hunting/Fishing/Trapping

Hunting/Fishing/Trapping Hunting, Fishing, Trapping and related conversations.

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  #1  
Old 08-10-2009, 11:35 PM
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roolu roolu is offline
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Ok this is a bit embarrassing but you all are the only ones I know to ask. I have never been hunting before, not even once. This year, I hope to change that. So, as a complete moron to all things "hunter", could someone spare some age-old wisdom as to what to do, what not to do. I know, there are classes for firearms and such, I've trained with firearms, grew up with firearms, thats not the issue. My issue is HOW TO hunt for specific animals. When is the best time of day? Where do I place myself in the woods to find such and such? Positive input will be appreciated. I know how to spot a deer trail, coyote track, etc. But the rest is a mystery. Help please?????
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  #2  
Old 08-11-2009, 01:49 AM
kevin_1 kevin_1 is offline
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First off what do you want to hunt for?
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  #3  
Old 08-11-2009, 10:03 AM
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Preferably rabbit, possibly dear. Might even have to hunt coyote to thin them out, we do have a season for them here in Indiana. Can't imagine what to do with one if I did manage to kill it.

But rabbit and dear I know how to cook, so I'll start with those.
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  #4  
Old 08-11-2009, 11:17 AM
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First, congratulations! Don't feel bad about just starting hunting. My sons (teens) and I started last year.

You mention that you've had firewarms training. That's good, but I would still recommend a hunter's education class in your area. The ones here have online training followed up by a day long workshop and live fire exercise. While you know the important ideas for gun safety, the hunter's education course will teach you some of the state laws, season dates and common sense things, like what colors not to wear when turkey hunting, etc., as well as let you talk with the local wildlife officers.

The other thing that I would recommend would be to go a few times with an experienced hunter and have them show you the ropes. This was a real blessing for us as you get words of "wisdom"... "This is why we are doing this".... "This is why we are at this spot.", etc...

I hope this helps and you enjoy yourself
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  #5  
Old 08-11-2009, 06:04 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
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I have to also say congrats on the decision to start hunting. I normally hunt just deer and rabbit, also. The main thing about rabbit is to wait until winter to get them. I can't remember what the deal is but something they have as far as parasite or something until after hard freezes. Also, the best rabbit hides are in the winter. Rabbits can be found anytime of the day. They are most easily hunted with a snow cover for tracking unless you know where they are ahead of time.

Deer are best hunted as early in the day as your state law allows and as late as they allow. I don't do much as far as tracking because I live here and see the deer on a regular basis and know where to find them on opening day. I only hunt here at home.

If you closer, I'd say come on down and I'll take you out with me for deer and rabbit.

Like it has already been said, go with an experienced hunter the first few times. Also, don't expect to bag a trophy your first year.... you might but....

Good luck
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  #6  
Old 08-11-2009, 07:13 PM
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Start with small game. rabbit, squirrel, etc. Some people have the desire to hunt then don't have the heart or stomach for it when the time comes. It's good to learn cleaning/field dressing on smaller game too, rather than start off with a deer. Again, unless you have experience with farm animals (like killing and cleaning chickens), you may not have the stomach for cleaning game. In winter, you can quickly field dress a rabbit while it's warm. I put them in empty platic bags afterward and put them in the game pouch of my vest or coat. They keep just fine till I get home. You can wait till you get home, but they get a bit harder to dress once they start gettin' stiff. Once you get more experience and confidence, then work up to bigger game.
Check your state to see what the requirements are on safety orange too. Some require it just during deer season and others require a certain amount during any season. After seeing a friend of mine get shot on private property during squirrel season, I wear an orange hat and vest at all times now. Apparantly his long ponytail looked like a squirrel to this other trespassing idiot.
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  #7  
Old 08-11-2009, 09:33 PM
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The guys offer excellent advice. Like they say, start small with whats in you area. Back at my place on my little 2 acres, I've got lots of rabbit, deer cross through, tons of quail and dove, I've heard turkey but never seen them and hogs have crossed through as well as I am surrounded by brush on every side of me. I dont hunt as much as I use to anymore but if you start off with small game and get the dressing it down real good then the rest should come easy. If I was was wanting to go and get some big game such as deer then I would make sure that someone went with me and willing to help me dress it correctly and split the meat for their help. Some things to practice is get your hunting license, practice good shot target placement, wear safety clothing and follow all hunting laws within you state. Game warden have a way of appearing out of nowhere. Have fun and enjoy the nature that surrounds you.

Oh and about those coyotes, hang them over the fencelines.
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  #8  
Old 08-11-2009, 10:03 PM
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Start now by knowing what a scrape is , what a rub is , the best location , when is the rut , Do you want to still hunt/use a blind , where is their food and water , what to wear , know your rules and find out where it is legal to hunt.Above all know what buck fever is.
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  #9  
Old 08-12-2009, 12:27 AM
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sigh...

Smoked Turkey oOooOo La La, fried Poke Chops an aigs inna morning wif hot biscuits an gravy, Deer sausage dipped in mustard, Quail wif bacon wrapped around it on the grill, Venison Stew... You REALLY want to learn how to do this hunting thing... Pork Butt Roast (suck'n back slobbers)...

~Grizzy~

(But don't shoot lil goats, they taste yucky an you won't like em !!
Pet'n a lil Nanny)
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  #10  
Old 08-12-2009, 02:12 PM
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Grizz, you made me so hungry I can hardly see straight! lol

Thanks to all of you that offered the advice. It sounds like squirrel/rabbit are good to start with. Might try turkey instead of deer this fall also. Got tons of those around here. If a coyote gets in my path, oops! lol

I did find that I can take the hunter education course completely online, then purchase my license online as well. Now, if I start out on small game, what is the best firearm to use? I may have to go "gun shoppin" first, darn my luck!

I know that my state requires hunter orange whenever hunting on state property, but I agree that it's good no matter what or where.
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  #11  
Old 08-12-2009, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roolu View Post
Grizz, you made me so hungry I can hardly see straight! lol
She has a way of doin' that! LOL

Quote:
Now, if I start out on small game, what is the best firearm to use? I may have to go "gun shoppin" first, darn my luck!
For small game like rabbit, coon, and such, I just use a .22. But for anything else like coyote, deer, etc, I use a Winchester 94. It's a .30/.30. That is my all purpose gun. It will down a deer with ease. Some hunters don't like it because they say you can't shoot as far. Their correct, but if I have to try and shoot any further than what my Winchester will travel, I figure is too far to be tryin' anyway. I always make sure it is close enough for a sure shot.
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  #12  
Old 08-17-2009, 08:35 PM
swampyankee swampyankee is offline
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I agree with Paul, .22 is a good place to start. From there you can go to shotguns and centerfire rifles as needed. Good luck
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  #13  
Old 08-18-2009, 01:44 PM
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Thank you again, started shopping for the .22, I appreciate everyone's help on this.
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  #14  
Old 08-20-2009, 04:40 PM
schneider554 schneider554 is offline
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I enjoy buck fever. I think I get it worse when it's just a big doe standing in front of me. It's also nice to remember that antlers make for a thin soup. I didn't make that up but a lot of people get awfully wrapped up in how big the rack on a deer is. Trophies are nice sometimes though.
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  #15  
Old 08-20-2009, 09:37 PM
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I grew up in a non-hunting/anti-hunting family. Anti-gun too. In Chicago, where very few people know how to hunt. At the age of 17 I got the hell out of the city and moved to Wisconsin. Anyway, I had no experience and no mentors. I learned how to clean animals by cleaning a fish, then a grouse, then a deer. I looked at pictures in books and just dove right in-telling myself the deer was like a big fish. I almost puked, but I did it. Gut shot my first deer, then shot it in the head to finish it off. What a mess.

In WI and Indiana people like to find a spot with a view of trails, feeding areas, etc. and sit. You can get a tree stand or not. I live in Idaho now, and no-one uses tree stands. I use a combination of still hunting (walk a bit then stop and look for a few minutes) or I just sit on a stump with a view.

Years later now, I live in Idaho. We have fishing all summer, hunting all fall and winter, and steelhead and Salmon in the winter and spring. I pursue game year round. I hunt deer, elk, bear, turkey, ducks, geese, and snowshoe hares. I may start applying for a moose tag. I only kill what I eat, so the only coyote I would shoot is if it was too close to my chickens.

I did not get a deer my first year, or even my second. I guess it was my third year. Don't give it up. Once you get one you'll know what the fuss is about. To me it is emotional, spiritual, physical, and economic to hunt. And practice with the gun. Make sure you can shoot accurately before the deer shows up and your adrenaline starts going.

Have fun.
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  #16  
Old 08-24-2009, 11:18 PM
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roolu, you're just a few years behind me in the quest! I knew how to shoot, but had never hunted before.

First off, read through all the information on your state's DNR webpage...you said you're in Indiana, which may be fairly similar to Michigan in some respects. There are certain sections of the state where you are not allowed to hunt for deer with a rifle.

I've never hunted for rabbit; started right off on deer and turkey. I still haven't gotten a turkey, and the first two years I deer hunted I never had a target and never took a shot.

I grew up on a farm; we've butchered chickens, pulled calves, etc., so I wasn't TOO concerned about cleaning the deer; the hard part was I really wasn't sure how to do it. I attended a few Women in the Outdoors and Becoming an Outdoorswoman events, asked a lot of questions and did a lot of reading. Still felt kind of clueless, but I took my shotgun and sat out in the woods and hoped for the best. I'm sure the deer were laughing at me, and the turkeys thought my efforts at calling were hilarious.

Things finally got better for me when a chance conversation with an older gentleman at church resulted in a date for opening morning for the firearm deer season. He had access to 40 acres that no one else hunted, and graciously adopted me as his 'hunting buddy'. I've gotten a deer almost every time I've gone out with him, and after my first fumbling attempts to clean a deer, his coaching has gotten me to the point where can quckly and efficiently get it open and clean and ready to haul out of the woods. Having a mentor has made all the difference; perhaps you can find someone to show you the ropes.

As far as guns, I would highly recommend the .22 for squirrels and general varmit control; if the regs in Indiana restrict you to a shotgun, the trusty 12 guage is a wonderful all-purpose gun you can use for geese, turkey, deer, and even trap and skeet.

Good luck!
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Last edited by Catalpa; 08-24-2009 at 11:20 PM. Reason: ...more to say
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  #17  
Old 08-25-2009, 10:07 AM
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Thanks Cat, I've been reading the DNR page. I think my landlord will let me hunt his woods, so won't have too much to worry about there. Squirrel season is open here so hopefully within the next week or two I'll be out trying it. Been reading on how field dress the little boogers, and the best way(s) people have said to hunt them. Just gotta take the time away from all the other things in life, lol.

Is there a link to those two events you mentioned? I'd be real interested in those.
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Old 08-25-2009, 10:59 PM
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Here roolu:

http://www.womenintheoutdoors.org/wito/?SUBSITE=wito

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7...424---,00.html

The WITO is part of the National Wild Turkey Federation so it should be in your state, the Becoming and Outdoorswoman is through the Michigan DNR but your DNR might have something like it too.

Have fun!
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  #19  
Old 09-01-2009, 04:25 PM
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wow, thanks! )
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  #20  
Old 09-11-2009, 04:07 PM
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For rabbits hunt them down at dawn and dusk by walking. At night, if allowed, use a light. A .22 will work for them, and the most fun I have hunting is jump shooting rabbits with a .22 or 12 Ga.

When first hunting deer, start using a blind until you get good at moving around (still hunting). You can stay in the blind if you wish, and there is no problem with that. A great general purpose rifle is a .243 Win. in whatever type of action you prefer. Don't shoot any further than you can consistantly hold a 12" circe. Your field groups will be at least twice the size of your bench rest groups with whatever you're shooting. Zero 2" high at 100 yds and you will be able to hit out to 300 yds, but you should never shoot that far.

PM me for whatever you need to know.

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