BHM Forum      
Subscribe to Backwoods Home Magazine print or Kindle editions
Office Hours Momday - Friday  8 am - 5 pm Pacific 1-800-835-2418

Facebook   YouTube   Twitter
Follow Us!



 
Backwoods Home Magazine, self-reliance, homesteading, off-grid

Features
 Home Page
 Current Issue
 Article Index
 Author Index
 Previous Issues
 Newsletter
 Letters
 Humor
 Free Stuff
 Recipes
 Print Classifieds

General Store
 Ordering Info
 Subscriptions
 Kindle Subscriptions
 ePublications
 Anthologies
 Books
 Back Issues
 Help Yourself
 All Specials
 Classified Ad

Advertise
 Web Site Ads
 Magazine Ads

BHM Blogs
 Massad Ayoob
 Ask Jackie Clay
 Claire Wolfe
 Where We Live
 Dave on Twitter
Retired Blogs
 Behind The Scenes
 Oliver Del Signore
 David Lee
 Energy Questions
 Bramblestitches

Quick Links
 Home Energy Info
 Jackie Clay
 Ask Jackie Online
 Dave Duffy
 Massad Ayoob
 John Silveira
 Claire Wolfe

Forum / Chat
 Forum/Chat Info
 Enter Forum
 Lost Password

More Features
 Meet The Staff
 Contact Us/
 Change of Address
 Write For BHM
 Privacy Policy

Retired Features
 Country Moments
 Feedback
 Links
 Radio Show





  
 

BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser.

  Who's In The Chat Room

Go Back   BHM Forum > Self-Reliance & Preparedness > Hands-on

Hands-on Hands-on/Repair topics that do not have a dedicated board, above.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-29-2009, 10:10 AM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default The roof's caving in

(Literally and figuratively LOL!) Neighbor informed me a couple weeks ago that the north side of my roof is caving in. I'm thinking the termites ate the boards and rafters. Do you think it would hold up to an Ohio winter if I just had a couple rafters and some boards replaced and covered it with tarps instead of shingles for now? The shingles are the expensive part aren't they? Or what if I waterproofed the boards for now instead of shingles and then covered with tarps? Think it would get us thru the winter?
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old 08-29-2009, 11:47 AM
johnny Male johnny is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ft Worth, Tex
Posts: 2,007
Default

A good and temporary fix might be okay by just tieing in a couple rafters to the ones there and covering with decking and then covering that with tar paper we call it. A roll of it is fairly cheap and will stand up to rain--snow and such to get you thru the winter.
How large is the damaged area? Do you have a crawl space to get access to it from the inside? Might need to put in a couple braces too when the rafters are tied in or spliced. That will give it more strength to withstand the added weight of winter snow.
Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-29-2009, 12:24 PM
NCLee NCLee is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 5,174
Default

Daf, try to get someone who knows something about carpentry and framing to check it for you. Someone who knows about the snow load in your area.

It may be a fairly simple fix, as Johnny noted, by sistering some 2x4's or 2x6's and a few extra braces for support. On the other hand, if it's too far gone, for a temp job, now's the time to make whatever decision is necessary. Don't try to wait and see what happens. Depending on how your home is framed, the roof can collapse and trap you, if the snow/ice load builds up enough.

Don't mean to frighten you. Just trying to get you to get some good advice from a local person with the expertise to guide you. Finger's crossed that it's a relatively easy and inexpensive fix.

Oh, and one other thing...... have you checked with the agencies in your area to see if any grants are available to help you repair your home? Some non profit organizations also have programs and such to help homeowners.

Lee
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-29-2009, 01:11 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default

Daff,

Another option in addition to Lees' is "Community Block Grants". It comes to the states and communities I think through Federal monies. But, here, a person applies to the county or city and if they are approved, the agency puts takes bids and then hires the work done for you at no cost to you. In many cases, they will not only repair the roof, but a number of other problems they see when they inspect for you application. For example, the mold problem you have, the roof, bad siding, etc. You might check into that and see if your county or city offers it.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-31-2009, 09:44 PM
cinok Male cinok is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Eastern OK
Posts: 4,506
Default

Do you have trusses or free framed roof whats the pitch can you inscpect the underside. Yeah alot of questions but you may be able to sister and then then add asom temp braces from the rafters to the floor bellow if you are on a slab. May not be pretty but it will work. worst thing to do is put ANY ANY weight on the roof in ohter words do not climb up on top.
__________________
1.Those with the biggest complaints are often the biggest part of problem.
2.Those calling for a fight are often the first to run and hide when the fight starts.
3.Those with a narrow agenda are often so blinded they have lost sight of reality.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-31-2009, 10:40 PM
Bones Bones is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 1,834
Default

Can you give us some pictures? I repaired many a termite damaged truss when I was in Guam. That place is termite heaven. Good thing they have typhoons the high winds blow off the roofs and revel the termite damage before the place collapses. Most of the replacement is all concrete buildings. If your rafters are termite infested what about from the ground up they dont usually go from the top down they start at the bottom and work their way up.

My dad got help from a catholic church he hired some teenagers for a donations. Yes they might be unskilled but if you get one skilled adult and the teenagers for the labor. Shingles are not that expensive. Lowes sometimes has the one year same as cash if you cant handle it yourself and need to hire somebody. Just make sure you pay it off in a year. Home depot prob has the same thing.
__________________
" I void warranties"
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-05-2009, 09:40 AM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny View Post
A good and temporary fix might be okay by just tieing in a couple rafters to the ones there and covering with decking and then covering that with tar paper we call it. A roll of it is fairly cheap and will stand up to rain--snow and such to get you thru the winter.
How large is the damaged area? Do you have a crawl space to get access to it from the inside? Might need to put in a couple braces too when the rafters are tied in or spliced. That will give it more strength to withstand the added weight of winter snow.
Good luck!
It's about a third of the north side of the roof. So about 8+ feet or so, maybe a little more. The house is about 24 x 22 or something like that. Couldn't tell you what the pitch?? is. I dropped the ceiling down. I would have to pull part of that out to get to it from the inside plus take out the drywall so I guess actually no, no access from inside unless I want to tear alot of stuff out! I'm thinking I might just do the tar paper thing. Then I'd just need rafters, boards and the tar paper. That shouldn't be too expensive, should it?
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-05-2009, 09:44 AM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cinok View Post
Do you have trusses or free framed roof whats the pitch can you inscpect the underside. Yeah alot of questions but you may be able to sister and then then add asom temp braces from the rafters to the floor bellow if you are on a slab. May not be pretty but it will work. worst thing to do is put ANY ANY weight on the roof in ohter words do not climb up on top.
I don't know if it's trusses or free framed. How would I tell which it is? Not on a slab. I have a crawl space.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-05-2009, 09:50 AM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
Can you give us some pictures? I repaired many a termite damaged truss when I was in Guam. That place is termite heaven. Good thing they have typhoons the high winds blow off the roofs and revel the termite damage before the place collapses. Most of the replacement is all concrete buildings. If your rafters are termite infested what about from the ground up they dont usually go from the top down they start at the bottom and work their way up.
That's interesting. I didn't know they work from the ground up. I didn't notice any damage towards the bottom of the house, I just saw the rotted wood at the top and piles of dust on the floor and porch. I did notice on the front of the house where I took the porch off that it looks like the floor supports are rotting out. There's some siding missing there and the insulation is showing. I haven't gotten around to fixing that. Maybe I'll just fall thru the floor one day LOL!

Quote:
My dad got help from a catholic church he hired some teenagers for a donations. Yes they might be unskilled but if you get one skilled adult and the teenagers for the labor. Shingles are not that expensive. Lowes sometimes has the one year same as cash if you cant handle it yourself and need to hire somebody. Just make sure you pay it off in a year. Home depot prob has the same thing.
No credit. Everything has to be done cash. But hardly any cash available.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-05-2009, 10:30 AM
NCLee NCLee is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 5,174
Default

Daf, once again, do get someone local to tell you what you need to do to fix your roof before winter set's in.

Yes, the termites have worked up from the ground, so your wall studs are probably in the same shape as those roof rafters. Since you say you have 8' of your roof "falling in", it won't be safe to go onto that roof to make repairs as the roof and side wall in that section may not support your weight. I don't know how severe the actual damage is, so I'm only speculating about the potential for serious problems, based on what you've said.

To make repairs you'll either have to tear off the existing roof down to the point of making repairs from the outside, including replacing wall studs, if needed from the outside. And, you'll need access, from the inside, to inspect your ceiling joists where they join the side walls in that area. Depending on how much damage is involved, you could have the ceiling collapse, if those joists give way. You can cut a small access hole in the ceiling dry wall to inspect. It isn't hard to repair that later. Just cut a rectangle between the ceiling joists. Later you can attach some wood strips to the joists to provide a place to attach your piece of replacement drywall.

Tarpaper on the outside of the roof may help with stopping leaks. However, I'm concerned about your snow load. The paper won't help if you need reinforcing the framing timbers.

Again, PLEASE, do get someone who knows framing carpentry to help you decide what needs to be done. Perhaps a friend or local contractor can inspect and advise without it costing you anything.

Lee
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-05-2009, 12:14 PM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCLee View Post
Daf, once again, do get someone local to tell you what you need to do to fix your roof before winter set's in.

Yes, the termites have worked up from the ground, so your wall studs are probably in the same shape as those roof rafters. Since you say you have 8' of your roof "falling in", it won't be safe to go onto that roof to make repairs as the roof and side wall in that section may not support your weight. I don't know how severe the actual damage is, so I'm only speculating about the potential for serious problems, based on what you've said.

To make repairs you'll either have to tear off the existing roof down to the point of making repairs from the outside, including replacing wall studs, if needed from the outside. And, you'll need access, from the inside, to inspect your ceiling joists where they join the side walls in that area. Depending on how much damage is involved, you could have the ceiling collapse, if those joists give way. You can cut a small access hole in the ceiling dry wall to inspect. It isn't hard to repair that later. Just cut a rectangle between the ceiling joists. Later you can attach some wood strips to the joists to provide a place to attach your piece of replacement drywall.

Tarpaper on the outside of the roof may help with stopping leaks. However, I'm concerned about your snow load. The paper won't help if you need reinforcing the framing timbers.

Again, PLEASE, do get someone who knows framing carpentry to help you decide what needs to be done. Perhaps a friend or local contractor can inspect and advise without it costing you anything.

Lee
Actually, it's worse than I thought. I just went out to take pics to post and the whole thing is caving in. The neighbor's son is a roofer and he said he'd do it. Don't know how much he knows about carpentry though. Roofers should know something about the rafters and such shouldn't they? He said he would tear the whole roof off and replace for material cost and a couple hundred dollars. I just don't know how much "materials" I'm going to be able to afford.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-05-2009, 12:17 PM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

I'll post the pics a little later today. Probably in my profile album thing as there are a few of them. I'm going out to work on the front bottom of the house right now. It takes me awhile to get those pics loaded or I'd post now.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-05-2009, 12:36 PM
NCLee NCLee is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 5,174
Default

Daf, it cost us about $2,500 to replace the roof shingles on our house a couple of years ago. My home is a little over 1800 sq ft. That price included replacing all the scattered vents with a ridge row venting system.

If you're just replacing roofing and decking in a small area of your house, it probably won't cost a lot. OSB sheeting and 2x4's aren't very expensive, for a small area. A roll of roofing, roofing nails, and a couple of bundles of shingles may be all that you need, if the damage is confined to one area. I'm hoping that's the case.

I'm glad to hear that you are getting someone to help. A roofer should know what's required from a framing standpoint to make your roof safe and secure.

Give a shout when you get the pix posted.

Lee
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-05-2009, 08:59 PM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Got the pics in my profile album under "house". You can't see the roof pics very good. The whole thing is sagging actually. I only noticed the one side last time I looked. The part with the shadow over it is all sagging. I covered the front today. It's so rotted there was nothing to nail into. Just touching the wood made it fall apart. I left the old rotted wood siding on at the bottom and nailed into that. Then actually nailed the siding on to try to hold the OSB board in place. Looks a mess but at least it's closed up.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-05-2009, 09:32 PM
NCLee NCLee is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 5,174
Default

Daf, couldn't see the pix of your roof very well. That's understandable from the angle you had to use to get the shots.

Has your roof actually dropped down from the top (ridgerow) 5 or 6 inches? Believe you said that the width was about 8'. Suspecting that you have 2 or 3 rafters that have given way at the top. (Depends on whether it was framed on 24" or 16" centers.) Your contractor may be able to sister those and then add a cross tie to each, if the rafters on the other side of the ridge are still sound.

For your repairs at the bottom, if you've just nailed up some siding and it the siding above doesnt overlap, you'll need to caulk to keep the rain from runing in behind what you've just put up. That'll further damage your existing sills and wall studs. Even plastic and duct tape will work as a temporary measure. Don't go all the way to the ground, as you'll need some air circulation.

Wish I could reach out and lend you a hand.
Lee
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 09-05-2009, 09:41 PM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCLee View Post
Daf, couldn't see the pix of your roof very well. That's understandable from the angle you had to use to get the shots.

Has your roof actually dropped down from the top (ridgerow) 5 or 6 inches? Believe you said that the width was about 8'. Suspecting that you have 2 or 3 rafters that have given way at the top. (Depends on whether it was framed on 24" or 16" centers.) Your contractor may be able to sister those and then add a cross tie to each, if the rafters on the other side of the ridge are still sound.

For your repairs at the bottom, if you've just nailed up some siding and it the siding above doesnt overlap, you'll need to caulk to keep the rain from runing in behind what you've just put up. That'll further damage your existing sills and wall studs. Even plastic and duct tape will work as a temporary measure. Don't go all the way to the ground, as you'll need some air circulation.

Wish I could reach out and lend you a hand.
Lee
I thought it was only about 8 foot but it's actually that whole side of the roof. Not sure inch wise on the sag but it doesn't look good. I was thinking I might caulk that siding. I had to put a piece on upside down to get it to hook on, so I think it will keep the water out but might just caulk to make sure. I don't know that this house is going to hold on much longer after seeing the front supports. It's just all rotted out. I hope it holds up a few more years.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-06-2009, 11:44 AM
DM DM is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location:
Posts: 2,236
Default

Sorry Daf, but it doesn't look good to me... I'm thinking pretty much the whole roof has to come off and be rebuilt. It's not a huge job, but it IS time comsumeing and won't be cheap.

If you don't get that roof taken care of, the snow load this winter just may cave the whole place in, and i'm not just saying that to scare you either... You really need to address that ASAP...

DM
__________________
Limit all politicians to two terms: One in office, one in prison. Illinois already does this!

Illegal immigration is ruining America, look what it has done to the White House.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-06-2009, 12:52 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default

Daff,

Check out this link: Rebuilding Together

I know nothing of it except what I saw on TV last night (yeah.. I caved - lol) It looks like there might be a way for you to get help through there....maybe... it's worth the effort.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-07-2009, 03:47 PM
cinok Male cinok is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Eastern OK
Posts: 4,506
Default

Daf,
Cant really see much from those pics. If this nieghbor can help you out I would make clear to him that you have a limited budget. Jobs like this can go above estimates real quick. I just got done helping out a wifes friend on some repaires to large workshop in her yard was supposed tobe a simple strip and reroof and replace a coulple of clap bords and paint. New sheathing nee roof a few rafters along with a bunch of new clap boards and reframing a few walls. The paint just went on. U can figure some numbers up your self. What size is the roof how sheets of underlayment how many square of shingles rolls of tar paper etc can all be done online if you have measurements.
__________________
1.Those with the biggest complaints are often the biggest part of problem.
2.Those calling for a fight are often the first to run and hide when the fight starts.
3.Those with a narrow agenda are often so blinded they have lost sight of reality.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 09-07-2009, 10:10 PM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DM View Post
Sorry Daf, but it doesn't look good to me... I'm thinking pretty much the whole roof has to come off and be rebuilt. It's not a huge job, but it IS time comsumeing and won't be cheap.

If you don't get that roof taken care of, the snow load this winter just may cave the whole place in, and i'm not just saying that to scare you either... You really need to address that ASAP...

DM
You're right. The neighbor's cousin just moved in from Tennessee. He's been roofing for 20+ years. Said it definitely won't hold up to the snow. The whole North side has to come off and half of the South side. And the ridge??? that piece across the top, is sagging too. He told me to get the materials and I can pay him labor costs in the next year or two. Can't beat that I guess. But I bet the materials are going to be quite a bit to replace almost the whole thing.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -2. The time now is 07:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.