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Go Back   BHM Forum > Self-Reliance & Preparedness > Arts & Crafts > Candlemaking/Soapmaking

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  #1  
Old 04-23-2008, 01:10 PM
ktlove ktlove is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 37
Default Homemade Fabric Softener Question

By searching the internet I have found recipes for homemade fabric softener, but this is liquid for the washing machine, and I am looking for softener for the drier.
Then I was able to find "homemade fabric softener sheets" but its really just a sponge or rag spritzed with bottled fabric softener from the store, so, not homemade at all, I cant even figure how that could even be cost effective at all, since the liquid softener sold at stores costs more than the sheets.
Anyhow, the fabric softener recipe for the wash (vinegar, baking soda water and essence) can that be used with the rag or sponge method?
No mention of it anywhere!
Have you tried it?
Or do you know why it may or may not work?

I figure using the homemade laundry soap in the wash and then adding the fabric softener into the wash could really end up beating up the clothes, or maybe something worse, a big BOOM!

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  #2  
Old 04-23-2008, 04:09 PM
Shamrock1121 Shamrock1121 is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktlove
By searching the internet I have found recipes for homemade fabric softener, but this is liquid for the washing machine, and I am looking for softener for the drier.
Then I was able to find "homemade fabric softener sheets" but its really just a sponge or rag spritzed with bottled fabric softener from the store, so, not homemade at all, I cant even figure how that could even be cost effective at all, since the liquid softener sold at stores costs more than the sheets.
Anyhow, the fabric softener recipe for the wash (vinegar, baking soda water and essence) can that be used with the rag or sponge method?
No mention of it anywhere!
Have you tried it?
Or do you know why it may or may not work?

I figure using the homemade laundry soap in the wash and then adding the fabric softener into the wash could really end up beating up the clothes, or maybe something worse, a big BOOM!
Clothing dried in a dryer are naturally "soft" from tumbling. * *You really don't need any softener. *If your clothes are stiff even after being dried in the dryer, then you are using WAY too much soap/detergent and perhaps need an extra rinse. *

If you've recently converted from commercial detergent and softener to homemade soap, it will take many washes to get the "gunk" out of your clothing from your old products. *The soda/vinegar/water/essence will NOT work in the dryer. *

Personally, I stay clear of softener and softener sheets, and haven't used any of them in years. *I use white (distilled) vinegar in the rinse (you don't need the soda). *Here are some vinegar tips for laundry: *http://www.vinegartips.com/laundry/ *

There are lots of toxins in softeners and softener sheets - even the unscented ones. *They build up a waxy coat on fabric that can actually cause fabric to become more flamable and that's what you call "soft". *It alters the fabric finish. *The "rain-fresh" smells are nothing but a cover-up. *They soften by coating the fabric with a thin layer of chemicals that isn't rinsed off. *

I rarely use the dryer. *On the few-and-far between occasions that I do use the dryer, I have a pair of dryer balls in it and they "fluff" the clothing. *http://www.asseenontv.com/prod-pages/dryer_balls.html *They really don't work for reducing static. * *

If you are trying to control static, you can do several things. *You can turn the heat down on the dryer and quit BAKING your clothing to death. *When the load is almost done, toss in a damp washcloth or small towel (damp with water ONLY), restart the machine for 30 seconds or so. *That will help reduce the static. *I've also filled a pump bottle with distilled water and have spritzed the contents in the dryer a few times to reduce the static. *Not enough to make things wet, but enough to decrease the static.

You said, "I figure using the homemade laundry soap in the wash and then adding the fabric softener into the wash could really end up beating up the clothes, or maybe something worse, a big BOOM!" *

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by that... *Perhaps you think there will be some kind of chemical explosion - like when you mix vinegar (an acid) and soda (an alkali) to create carbon dioxide. * Yet you've used detergents and fabric softeners and were you never concerned about the chemicals, nor any potential explosions?

About "beating" those clothes up...most people think the washing machine is savage on the clothing, but it's not so much the turbulence in the washing machines, or the clothing rubbing against each other, as the ability of highly alkaline products to dissolve clothing materials. *

Washing in warm water increases the activity of the chemical reactions in liquid and powdered detergents to the point the chemical reactions will actually cause buttons made of bone to dissolve over time. *It's the pH of liquid and powdered detergents that damages clothing more-so than the activity in the washer.
*
-Karen
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  #3  
Old 04-23-2008, 06:46 PM
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MotherCharlotte MotherCharlotte is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

Very informative post, Karen!

I don't use the dryer very much either, but when I do I never use any sort of fabric softener. I have found that the laundry turns out just fine most of the time--the times when it comes out all static-y is when there was some fleece clothing (as in polar fleece, the synthetic stuff). That stuff shouldn't go in the dryer because it makes so much static, and because it doesn't absorb water and so is practically dry coming out of the washer anyway.

That's my tip for the day.
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  #4  
Old 06-11-2008, 12:50 AM
annabella1 annabella1 is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

If you like the fabric softener smell on your clothes you can add a fragrance sachet to your dryer or just put a couple drops of essential oil on a washcloth and add at the end. I really find fabric softener unnecessary I have always used vinegar in the rinse water.
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  #5  
Old 06-15-2008, 04:58 PM
crowweaver crowweaver is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

You can make Lavender water (which has many uses) and dampen a wash rag with it to throw in the dryer. You can also add a little to the rinse water if your using a solar dryer

A little lavender water kept in a spray bottle is good for lightly misting carpets and upholstery, good for stuffy car smells too.

You can also make a paste of Lavender water and baking soda for cleaning.

My recipe for Lavender Water is ...

Bring a gallon of water to boil in a large pot. As soon as it begins to boil remove from heat and add Lavender (about 1 cup dry or 3/4 cup fresh- slightly bruised), cover and steep for up to 30 minutes. How long it steeps and how much lavender you use depends on what you intend to use it for and whether you want to dilute it as you go. Store in the fridge and it last for quite some time. Small amounts can be left out and stay good for a week or so depending on the heat.
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  #6  
Old 06-16-2008, 01:39 AM
sbemt456 Female sbemt456 is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

Crowweaver do you use the leaves or the flowers of the lavender or both in your lavender water?
Also love reading your blogs. Very calming.

stella
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  #7  
Old 06-16-2008, 10:51 AM
crowweaver crowweaver is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

Hi Stella

Thank you so much!

I use both leaves and flowers, or just leaves if it isn't in bloom. You see the flowers used most often but the leaves are full of essential oil.

Just a leaf sprig can scent a whole closet.
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  #8  
Old 06-16-2008, 02:32 PM
Shamrock1121 Shamrock1121 is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

[quote author=crowweaver link=board=cra-candle-soap;num=1208963449;start=0#4 date=06/15/08 at 11:58:08]You can make Lavender water (which has many uses) and dampen a wash rag with it to throw in the dryer. You can also add a little to the rinse water if your using a solar dryer *

quote]

crowweaver - What properties in lavender water work as a substitute for "fabric softener", or do you only add it for adding scent, and not a softener?

I recently made Lavender Vinegar to use in the rinse, instead of fabric softener, since vinegar is a common substitute for liquid softener in the wash. It worked well, especially since I line dry.

Lavender Vinegar:

1 pint of white vinegar and a handful of dried lavender flowers (be generous the older the dried flours are). Seal in a jar and let sit for 6-weeks.

There are other similar recipes to be found on the web.

-Karen
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  #9  
Old 06-16-2008, 04:11 PM
crowweaver crowweaver is offline
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Default Re: Homemade Fabric Softener Question

To my knowledge ...

Lavender doesn't actually soften the fabrics but it's antiseptic qualities help remove the residues from the detergents.

Vinegar doesn't actually soften the fabric either but it does break down the detergent or soap residue so that your clothes or hair rinse cleaner and won't have build up.

You can use baking soda in the wash or rinse water or add it to the lavender water.

To specifically soften fabric, there's a byproduct of soy you can get but I don't know what it's called. I believe it's what Seventh Generation fabric softener uses tho.

Using something to remove the soap residue is generally enough to make most laundry soft enough for most people. Hanging it to dry on a windy day or shaking it well when you take it down also softens it. It's generally the detergent or soap that makes it stiff tho.

Soapwort is fairly easy to grow and is excellent for washing delicates. You can also add it to homemade laundry soap to add suds.
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