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  #1  
Old 01-26-2010, 01:36 AM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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Default greenhouse with a rocket mass heater vid

I just now uploaded this!

If enough folks rate and comment on it in the first 24 hours, it apparently activates some sort of youtube magic and then our homesteading stuff gets a few minutes of fame in front of the general public!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtFvdMk3eLM

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 01-26-2010, 03:12 PM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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Wow! It's now on page 3 of science and technology "top rated" and page 3 of "most discussed"! By the count of things, with 15 more comments today it will be on page 1 of "most discussed"

I think this is the best a video of mine has ever done!
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  #3  
Old 01-26-2010, 08:54 PM
MooseToo MooseToo is offline
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very interesting - do you know if anyone has ever installed a window at the top of the barrel so that combustion can actually be seen ? perhaps, if the window was able to be covered with a heat reflective shield, it would be possible to select between quick radiant space heat and heat to the storage bed ?
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:14 PM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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I've never heard of that - but that would be wicked cool. Woudn't the glass get sooty or something?
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  #5  
Old 01-27-2010, 02:48 AM
MooseToo MooseToo is offline
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Originally Posted by paul wheaton View Post
I've never heard of that - but that would be wicked cool. Woudn't the glass get sooty or something?
i wouldn't expect it to soot up any worse than they do in a standard wood heating stove - probably less since the the description you provide of the workings inside the "barrel" sounds like it would be a less smoky spot than the firebox of a wood stove - and, it would not be that difficult to design a "window" that could be easily removed for cleaning -
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  #6  
Old 01-27-2010, 06:43 PM
grandmajoy grandmajoy is offline
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I want to build one of these stoves in the house I'm building, I have a few questions for you.

1. Have you tried heating water with one? Like for radiant floor heat, or potable water? How would you set it up?

2. How about heating a hot tub?

3. I'm thinking of doing a passive solar floor with cinder blocks lined up to make air passages through the floor with venting on the north and south of the floor. How would be the best way to run duct work from a rocket stove to help heat the floor?

My house is 22' x36', 22' having a southern exposure. Its a timber frame/straw bale, right now just the frame is up. Still working on getting the straw to stay up!

Any info would be great! I do have the Rocket stove book but the stuff you have posted is much clearer.

Thanks. Here is a pic of what I'm trying to do, have got a little further than this but not much.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/forum/v...ad.php?t=12859
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  #7  
Old 01-27-2010, 06:48 PM
grandmajoy grandmajoy is offline
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Good grief I didn't think I'd post the pics that big when I posted that! Sorry!

This has a bit newer pic.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/forum/v...ad.php?t=17493

Last edited by grandmajoy; 01-27-2010 at 07:01 PM. Reason: newer picture
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  #8  
Old 01-31-2010, 11:21 AM
SPIKE Male SPIKE is offline
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This is very interesting to me, but how well will the metal being used hold up over time. The metal I see being used is galvanized duct work. I am not sure is was designed for this application. It would be a big pain to replace running through the thermal mass.

SPIKE
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  #9  
Old 02-02-2010, 07:20 AM
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AlchemyAcres AlchemyAcres is offline
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Pretty cool idea!

I plan to experiment with the Larkin Solar Heater with flat black aluminum mini-blinds as the heat exchanger for totally passive annualized mass thermal storage for a greenhouse..... hopefully this coming summer!

Larkin's Thermosyphon Solar Air Heater....

http://davidmdelaney.com/larkin/larkin-tap-1.html



~Martin
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  #10  
Old 02-02-2010, 02:58 PM
MooseToo MooseToo is offline
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Originally Posted by AlchemyAcres View Post
Pretty cool idea!

I plan to experiment with the Larkin Solar Heater with flat black aluminum mini-blinds as the heat exchanger for totally passive annualized mass thermal storage for a greenhouse..... hopefully this coming summer!

Larkin's Thermosyphon Solar Air Heater....

http://davidmdelaney.com/larkin/larkin-tap-1.html



~Martin
the syphon idea appears to have merit - on a quick skim of the patent drawings, i would be hesitant to accept that the backflow butterfly valve (detail 27) would have any significant value - at least not worth the added construction time and potential for defect or inattention resulting in diminished efficiency in the normal heating sequence - it's more like an "ain't that neat" feature -

do you really anticipate that syphon action alone will produce enough airflow to deliver all generated btu's to a storage bed as opposed to just delivering warmed air to an open room ? - i think i'd supplement inherent airflow with some small solar-powered fans -
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  #11  
Old 02-02-2010, 03:33 PM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmajoy View Post

1. Have you tried heating water with one? Like for radiant floor heat, or potable water? How would you set it up?
I have heated a kettle on the top. And if a person wants to do that sort of thing, there are ways about that.

As for radiant floor heat, I know of several people doing this with the exhaust (no water involved)

For heating your shower water and the like, I know that the word from the instructors is "if you do it you will die" - but I think that is mostly CYA, and there are some serious issues around hot water. I did see one do this and posted a video on it: youtube.com/paulwheaton12

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Originally Posted by grandmajoy View Post
2. How about heating a hot tub?
I have not seed one, but I see no reason why it cannot be done.

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Originally Posted by grandmajoy View Post
3. I'm thinking of doing a passive solar floor with cinder blocks lined up to make air passages through the floor with venting on the north and south of the floor. How would be the best way to run duct work from a rocket stove to help heat the floor?
I have seen this discussed before. There is a word for doing that. It's like an old roman thing. You might check the forums at permies.com
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2010, 03:35 PM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPIKE View Post
This is very interesting to me, but how well will the metal being used hold up over time. The metal I see being used is galvanized duct work. I am not sure is was designed for this application. It would be a big pain to replace running through the thermal mass.

SPIKE
I have seen this discussed before. If memory serves - where the the metal is most likely to give up then you still have the cob holding things together.

As for the loose soil space - if you have to replace it once every 20 years, I would think that's not such a big deal.
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  #13  
Old 02-03-2010, 06:53 AM
rantinraven Female rantinraven is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmajoy View Post
I want to build one of these stoves in the house I'm building, I have a few questions for you.

1. Have you tried heating water with one? Like for radiant floor heat, or potable water? How would you set it up?

2. How about heating a hot tub?

3. I'm thinking of doing a passive solar floor with cinder blocks lined up to make air passages through the floor with venting on the north and south of the floor. How would be the best way to run duct work from a rocket stove to help heat the floor?

My house is 22' x36', 22' having a southern exposure. Its a timber frame/straw bale, right now just the frame is up. Still working on getting the straw to stay up!

Any info would be great! I do have the Rocket stove book but the stuff you have posted is much clearer.

Thanks. Here is a pic of what I'm trying to do, have got a little further than this but not much.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/forum/v...ad.php?t=12859
Grandma Joy,
We built a rocket mass heater 2 years ago in our basement. There are some guys working on a design right now that would allow you to heat water with a RMH. The problem so far has been flash (water turning to steam because it was too hot). You could run the water pipes through the mass bench however you would need a pipe that was VERY long. You wouldn't want pipe fittings that could wear out and cause a leak. If the guys I know get it right I will post some pictures here for you to see how to modify the system.
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  #14  
Old 02-04-2010, 02:31 PM
MooseToo MooseToo is offline
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so, raven - what is your impression of the stove in your basement - would you build another ?
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  #15  
Old 02-13-2010, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MooseToo View Post
very interesting - do you know if anyone has ever installed a window at the top of the barrel so that combustion can actually be seen ?
I've seen a video of one with a window in the firebox but not on top of the barrel. If what I have read is near right the temp on top of the barrel could easily go over 1,000 degrees. In the internal chimney temps commonly are over 1,000 with some over 1,500 degrees I think. But it would be cool to be able to watch.

I've got the guts of one of these in the back yard to play with till I can build a real one.

John
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  #16  
Old 02-15-2010, 10:09 PM
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Roots_Farm Roots_Farm is offline
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You damn hippies

I use to build a rudimentary version of these in boy scouts and never knew it.

I'm fascinated by the videos I've seen and wish there was a workshop around here to attend. I'm looking for a way to heat my basement when I finally get it finished and I think I found my answer.

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  #17  
Old 02-17-2010, 03:41 PM
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Roots,
I don't know which is neater about these heater. The ease of building or their heating/burning efficiency. As long as the bench-thermal mass is big enough it is amazing how long it will continue keeping a place warm.
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  #18  
Old 02-17-2010, 07:40 PM
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Roots_Farm Roots_Farm is offline
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How far can you run the exhaust (how big can I make my thermal mass bench) and does the exhaust need to vent above my roof line or just outside?
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  #19  
Old 02-24-2010, 07:43 PM
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How far can you run the exhaust (how big can I make my thermal mass bench) and does the exhaust need to vent above my roof line or just outside?
Yes more info needed. I am concerned about how much fuel can be added and how long it will burn as well.
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  #20  
Old 02-25-2010, 04:43 PM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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The answers to these questions is "it depends".

For a bigger system, I think you can have about 90 feet of exhaust, but you take away five feet for every 90 degree turn.

Where the exhaust goes depends on a lot of stuff, but I favor an exhaust about two feet off the ground. If you built the system well and are using it right, then the exhaust will tend to sink most of the time. On a really cold day it might rise. (CO2 and steam are typically heavier than air)

An eight inch system will have feed that is eight inches in diameter (if round - or more like 7x7 if square). You can put three foot long sticks in there if you want. As they burn, they will sink into the stove.
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