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History history n. A record or narrative description of past events and times.

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  #1  
Old 03-17-2010, 03:47 PM
alma alma is offline
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Default My History of the Sixties

I've been going through some old papers that i wrote in the sixties.
Among them are about 50 letters full of things i wrote to my sister and she saved them for historical value and her son sent them to me after she died.

Then i have posts i've written over the years on this forum and private letters to others that i saved duplicates of.

My daughter is using some of these duplicates to print on the backs ,many odds and ends she finds on the internet, but i still have tons of originals that i am still keeping.

I wrote about my experiences in chicago in 1968 at the democratic convention there. It was a fiasco.

I wrote about the development of the tennesse valley. My brother spent time there like a lot of other young people who had no jobs at the time.

I wrote about the depression years of the 1930s-1940s, on and on.

I wrote about my working at martin luther king's headquarters at 14th and U. sts in washington d.c., and was there when he was murdered in some other city helping the garbage workers in their strike. I forget at the moment what city it was. I think it was memphis.

We were escorted quickly out of the area when a riot started there and it became almost a war zone. The national quard had to come in for awhile.

People who were able to stay there had us telephone from our home to tell their relatives they were ok.

Some draft dodgers were hiding on the second floor.

We were asked to bring in food the next day after the city was secured by the guard, and to do other things for those who were able to remain.

A lot of black militants manned many of the corners and Rev. Faunteroy introduced them to me and told them to take care of me, and they did, and escorted me when necessary through some dangerous areas.

I forget so much. Senior moments, you know, and would not remember some of these things if i had not written them down here and there so often.

I demonstrated for civil rights when it was not popular, and anti war stuff all the time.

Can you believe it. I really thought that we could end war.

--but the civil rights worked out a lot better, and my son married a black woman who has been my friend for over 30-40 years. She and my daughter an i are like the three musketeers. My only grandson is a beautiful black man black who is deep into computer stuff for the government.

We fought for women's rights to get credit and other things that i don't remember at the moment.

I'd hoped that women could stay home to care for their families instead of having to work so much and have their kids tossed hither and yon. That is not what i had in mind.

Well, i had developed cancer and threw myself into all kinds of things. I thought i'd rather get shot than die of cancer. I had my first cancer operation in 1969 and the second many years later and my third a couple of years ago now.

I vowed that, if i lived, i'd never give up fighting for this and that, and so be it.

I'm 87 now and don't do much except write and reorganize things i have written in the past.

I forget for the moment what i'd originally planned to write. Ce la vie, whatever that means. love, alma
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Old 03-17-2010, 04:04 PM
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Can you believe it. I really thought that we could end war.
Don't sell yourself short.
If it weren't for the protest a lot more people would have been killed.
The protest put a lot of pressure on the politicians to get out.
Glad you have written your history down.
I have lost a lot of my family history with the passing of each relative.
Have your daughter or someone get everything in digital format.
Easier to store and easier to share.
Thank you for sharing.
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Old 03-19-2010, 03:36 AM
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Hello Alma,

I've just read your poignant remembrances of oppressive times endured by you, and our Country.

Wikipedia describes the 1968 Democratic National Convention (as it): "was held during a year of violence, political turbulence, and civil unrest, particularly riots in more than 100 cities following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4th. The convention also followed the assassination of Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Robert F. Kennedy". Despite all, you, and America, prevailed and thrived.

Again, our Country teeters on the precipice of _____, we each have our own term of choice. But, if we confront "it" with the same tenacity and resolve, that you have fought your life's battles, God Willing, we and the U.S.A. too, will persevere.

Alma, you set a courageous example and, I thank you sincerely for it,

Gracie
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Old 03-26-2010, 03:06 PM
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Alma--
Please put all your pieces of writing together into a book of sorts for your grandchildren and their children's children. You have such a wonderful heart and such a rich history of pride, compassion, and courage. They deserve to have the written history of their wonderful matriarch. It will be a treasure to them all their lives. Even if you just make your own scrapbook, there may come a day when some of the kids will publish it so every one of them can have a copy of your (handwritten) notes.
You are the type of American that I long for my daughter(s) to become.
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Old 06-24-2012, 08:01 PM
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In these recollections do you have any stories about the Ku Klux Klan ?
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Old 06-25-2012, 06:42 PM
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I was a young woman then.
White
Mother
Wife

I couldnt imagine the terror-I feared
what they stood for.

Evil in a sheet.

My question would be:

How many innocent men/women/teens/children
that WERE INNOCENT did they kill? Without due process?

How many black folk did they terrify into submission?

If I am not mistaken they orginally formed up to punish
white-men that didnt take care of their families--drunks were their specialty.

Now its the new terror--skin-heads punks.

I pray this country Never returns to such a hideous action by citizens.

They set themselves up as judge and jury---and they never seem to be
interested in the truth.
Horifying bunch of maggots.

txanne
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Old 06-26-2012, 01:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
I was a young woman then.
White
Mother
Wife

I couldnt imagine the terror-I feared
what they stood for.

Evil in a sheet.

My question would be:

How many innocent men/women/teens/children
that WERE INNOCENT did they kill? Without due process?

How many black folk did they terrify into submission?

If I am not mistaken they orginally formed up to punish
white-men that didnt take care of their families--drunks were their specialty.

Now its the new terror--skin-heads punks.

I pray this country Never returns to such a hideous action by citizens.

They set themselves up as judge and jury---and they never seem to be
interested in the truth.
Horifying bunch of maggots.

txanne
The one to fear now is the government itself. All evil needs to triumph is for good men to do nothing. Well, I wonder how many good men we have anymore. We sure aren't sending them to Washington. What we have running the country today is a joke, a bunch or Republicrats that are bent on lining their own pockets and destroying this country and all that has been fought for and earned.

The Viet Nam conflict was a terrible war. All war is hell. As a Christian believer and a member of a church that believes in peace, I oppose war in any form but I also do not condemn anyone who has gotten caught up in it. The way the soldiers returning from that war were treated by "war protestors" and draft dodging hippies is a crime.

I was a kid at the time and my favorite uncle who was not too much older than I was drafted. My grandfather being a peaceful man and believing the Bible begged my uncle to go to prison rather than go to war and kill people.

My uncle said, "Dad, your convictions are not necessarily mine."

My uncle went to war and came home and was spit upon and had blood thrown on him when he got off the plane and returned to this country after all the horror of the hell hole in Asia. This helped contribute to the rest of what piled up in his mind. No heroes welcome, he didn't want one he wasn't one, but he did deserve to be able to return to home peacefully and not be treated that way.

He became a terrible alcoholic as the ghosts that he lived with tromented him. It destroyed his marriage and his family. War is hell but those who treated those poor soldiers returning from what their country sent them off to do are just as bad as those poor boys who only loved and obeyed their country's call.

True peace follows the path of love.
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:13 AM
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Veit Nam is our most shameful time in recent
history.

Was billed as a police training action.
An Army Capt. was the first registered
American KIA. 1957
I believe his name was capt.John Anderson.

The idiot free-love crowd didnt/dont understand
that military enlisted TOOK orders from the Commander
in Chief--They were ORDERED to South East Asia.

The 38th parrell has always been a military bone of
contention.

That WAR--and it was was never a police action--planned and
carried out BY rich Americans and made even Richer.
They are the only ones that came out on top.


I have a family history of military service and we gave
one of my heros--I have very few heros and very few time
goes by that I dont grieve for my hero.

3 tours and was Special Forces-parachuting in with medical
supplies--He was shot in his parachute--and drowned when he
landed=Best we understand there was over a hundred wounds.

Staff Sgt.James L. Cherry--He had been taken prisoner at one time and
escaped --living in the jungle until he couldnt find American forces.

If you want to be humbled and and are young enough to have not been
plagued by this War--Go to The Wall--once of the most Awesome places
in this country.

Soldiers returning from these useless wars our Military are engaged in now
are returning to a totally different America--Thank God.

One thing thats gripes my ever loving skinny is we caved in--we promised billons
(to return prisoners and kia bodies) to rebuild --politicals--caused our military
in horrible prisons to die--Never to be brought home.

What A Horrible Disgrace
Shameful
txanne
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:50 AM
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Came back to add:

I do believe this war had a great affect
in removing the draft as a means of forcing
service in the military.

And I believe forcing military was unConstitutional.
Just my opinion.

txanne
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
Veit Nam is our most shameful time in recent
history.




If you want to be humbled and and are young enough to have not been
plagued by this War--Go to The Wall--once of the most Awesome places
in this country. . . . . . . . . . . .


I do believe this war had a great affect
in removing the draft as a means of forcing
service in the military


txanne
I have never been a great one for the military but have seen the wall. Oh how sobering and moving it is , especially when you see yourself reflected and you see those many names you think, but for the grace of God . . .

Then I went to Gettysburg and saw all the graves and couldn't help but cry when I came to a group of graves where all the names were Mennonite and Quaker names. These boys had been raised that war was wrong and yet somehow they were caught up in that terrible war. So as the Bible says, there's nothing new under the sun.

As for doing away with the draft, that's a rich man's advantage as it now insures all the cannon fodder are poor folks. Many a poor family's son has gone off to the military as it was good money and the Army or whatever promised them the world on a chain. To get a college education many boys and girls have joined up where if they were rich kids they wouldn't have been forced to do so.
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:48 PM
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You make it sound as if poor folks are forced into the military. Not just wrong, but WAAY wrong. Today's military is a cross section of all America. Without a doubt, some young people are attracted to the military for the educational bennies, but by far the most of them are there to serve their country. If they should also gain from personal growth while there, more power to them.

I object to the overall tone of some of the previous posts. IMO, Jane Fonda should have been hanged for treason, and many of those "flower children" should have been stripped of their citizenship.

Those who want to stick their hands out and say, "gimme-gimme-gimme" without ever having to sacrifice for the continuation of the Nation, deserve nothing but what they earn, which is nothing.

Debate over the cause and objectives of the Vietnam War is good and healthy. It is what we do in a supposedly "free" country. Turning one's back on the Nation and trying to bring it to a halt is borderline treason.

Personally, I think it's a shame that those planeloads of troops returning from Southeast Asia weren't allowed to respond in kind to the useless trash that spit on them and shouted invective.

Brave, patriotic kids don't deserve that kind of treatment after the hardships they endured.
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Old 06-26-2012, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grumble View Post
You make it sound as if poor folks are forced into the military. Not just wrong, but WAAY wrong. Today's military is a cross section of all America. Without a doubt, some young people are attracted to the military for the educational bennies, but by far the most of them are there to serve their country. If they should also gain from personal growth while there, more power to them.

I object to the overall tone of some of the previous posts. IMO, Jane Fonda should have been hanged for treason, and many of those "flower children" should have been stripped of their citizenship.

Those who want to stick their hands out and say, "gimme-gimme-gimme" without ever having to sacrifice for the continuation of the Nation, deserve nothing but what they earn, which is nothing.

Debate over the cause and objectives of the Vietnam War is good and healthy. It is what we do in a supposedly "free" country. Turning one's back on the Nation and trying to bring it to a halt is borderline treason.

Personally, I think it's a shame that those planeloads of troops returning from Southeast Asia weren't allowed to respond in kind to the useless trash that spit on them and shouted invective.

Brave, patriotic kids don't deserve that kind of treatment after the hardships they endured.
Grumble

Please dont take umbage with my post--I havent even got to that worthless piece of
of trash--Jane Fonda.
I was outside the Dallas/Ft.Worth airport when many Texas boys came home--in boxes
paying my respects--YES the ass-wipes were there--I wanted to shoot them my self.

And I totally agree with ya--just say it different.
My family paid the price---its all I can do to post about it.

Respectfully annie
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Old 06-27-2012, 03:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grumble View Post
You make it sound as if poor folks are forced into the military. Not just wrong, but WAAY wrong. Today's military is a cross section of all America. Without a doubt, some young people are attracted to the military for the educational bennies, but by far the most of them are there to serve their country. If they should also gain from personal growth while there, more power to them.

I object to the overall tone of some of the previous posts. IMO, Jane Fonda should have been hanged for treason, and many of those "flower children" should have been stripped of their citizenship.

Those who want to stick their hands out and say, "gimme-gimme-gimme" without ever having to sacrifice for the continuation of the Nation, deserve nothing but what they earn, which is nothing.

Debate over the cause and objectives of the Vietnam War is good and healthy. It is what we do in a supposedly "free" country. Turning one's back on the Nation and trying to bring it to a halt is borderline treason.

Personally, I think it's a shame that those planeloads of troops returning from Southeast Asia weren't allowed to respond in kind to the useless trash that spit on them and shouted invective.

Brave, patriotic kids don't deserve that kind of treatment after the hardships they endured.
Yeah??? How many kids in the military are from millionaire families? How about how many are the sons or daughters of our congressmen? Then look and see how many are farm kids and from blue collar homes and I rest my case.
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Old 06-27-2012, 04:22 PM
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I don't have those numbers, and neither do you. My reply would be, "quite a few." The military is a cross-section of the US population. If 1% of the population is a millionaire or congress critter, then I'd guess that pretty close to 1% of the military came from such families.

Actually, maybe a bit lower. Those young people who sign up would only come from families who feel an obligation to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States from all enemies, foreign and domestic. That leaves out about 40% of the families in this country who endorse crapping on the flag and shouting gimme-gimme-gimme.

It isn't economic status that determines a person's need to serve their country. It's all about values.
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Old 06-27-2012, 09:50 PM
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VALUES it is .......

My son is currently serving in the military. The US Navy to be precise. He comes from a LONG line of military that have served with pride in their country.

Great Grandpa served in the 48th Volunteer out of Rolla in the Civil War from 1863-65 took a musket ball to the hand.......

Great Great Uncle Walter was in the Span-AM war 1898.....

Both My Grandfathers were in WWI France and Germany and several Great Uncles also......

Dad was in the US Navy in WWII and his ship was sunk off Guadalcanal.
Father in Law was in Europe and liberated a work camp....

Many cousins were in the service and several died on foreign soil.....

I did not enlist, although I would have ............VALUES
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:52 AM
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My music memories of the 60's were of Real
Rock&Roll

Bill Haley and the Comets
A young punk that prowled
Magnolia Gardens named Elvis

Jerry Lee Lewis
The Satins
Frankie Limon

Ray Charles
Little Richard

Big Bopper
Richie Valens
And a half blind Roy Orbison

And a 100 more heart-breakers.

txanne
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Old 07-01-2012, 10:46 AM
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Mo'town! Learning to dance to Soul Train! (Then, consequently being told that "good girls" didn't dance that way...)

Contradictions - serious, passionate, shocking contradictions - is how I would sum up the 60s. I was old enough to get invited to woodstock; young enough I wasn't allowed to go.... and seriously reading newspapers, studying current events and politics and social issues by that time. I grew up with early FM rock & roll stations... old fashioned values (we'll go there some other time)... and lots of "new-fangled ideas" that took me at least 20 years to sort out & reconcile for myself philosophically.

From the age of 12 on - I learned to watch, think and ask any question about anything that I didn't understand about what I saw going on in the world. Reflect and try to understand. And the 60s are my LEAST FAVORITE era to remember. It was almost chaos - a number of times; fearful in a lot of different sections of society; inhibited, yet resentful of the restrictions; and there was nothing innocent about it. My neighborhood of kids kept shrinking as the boys went to war and didn't come home. I missed them. I had/still have lots of nightmares about "back then".

Unions, strikes where families went hungry all because the union decreed it... and one dare not be a scab to put food on the table because the penalty was violence... the unexplainable and unimaginable decline in US steel manufacturing, auto manufacturing... and thereafter the spread to all other consumer goods... imported, to keep the cost to us average and poor people down... because the unions drove the cost to produce - and therefore the prices - up so high no one benefited. Did anyone ever really find Jimmy Hoffa?

The 60s was a time when values went bonkers. What had always been true - was now "bad", according to some new type of reasoning. What had previously been "bad"... well - what's your hangup? - it was seen as personal failing or character weakness to not participate in the value-shift popular at that short moment...

The one thing I'm glad to have encountered in the 60s was the whole earth catalog, and Rodale's early publications - the original organic gardening and prevention.

I'm still trying to forget all the rest.
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Old 07-01-2012, 03:14 PM
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In the fifties the top marginal tax rate in the U.S. was 90%, that’s a lot of money extracted from the economy, a great deal of this money was used to pay off the debt from World War Two, some was used to pay for Korea, the cold war, and build the interstate highway system, but also a massive amount of that money went to fund things like the Marshal Plan, where the U.S. re-built Western Europe and Asia.
Even with the massive infusion of U.S. taxpayer money it still took Western Europe and Japan around twenty years to fully recover from the effects of World War Two (about average) So by the mid to late sixties U.S. manufacturers, who by then lacked the cash reserves to make capital improvements to their facilities, were facing foreign competition from state of the art factories that their tax money had built.
The U.S. taxpayer was also paying for the defense of Western Europe and large parts of Asia, either directly with the U.S. Military or by funding foreign militaries.
Since Western Europe and Japan didn’t have to pay for their own defense this freed up lots of capital, which was used to subsidize their industries, (to this day), both directly and indirectly.
With all this in mind, the decline of U.S. manufacturing was neither inexplicable, nor unexplainable
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Old 07-01-2012, 03:24 PM
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WHI, a lot of thought went into that post. My compliments.

You touched on a lot of topics, but what sticks with me can be summed up as "WWII generation bumps into the 'Nam generation." Our WWII parents spoiled us -- not so much financially, but by protecting us from the reality of what a nation does while fighting for its life. With Korea as a transition from brutal "all or nothing" war to the "designer" wars that followed, we Boomers were protected and isolated from the thought that the nation really could be destroyed. Even the silly "duck and cover" exercises were not taken seriously, and the cartoon turtle that told us how to survive a nuclear attack was snickered at on the playground, even as our teachers worried that we were growing up in fear of total annihilation. Until the Cuban Missile Crisis, I didn't know a single person who really had a visceral concern about that.

But there's no doubt that the 60s was a time of change, questioning everything our parents took for granted. And the schism of values and ideas that began then, continues today.
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Old 07-02-2012, 09:28 AM
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Thanks Seaman for that larger perspective on what happened to steel & manufacturing. I think that's probably the reason for what back then (I was 12 when steel started slowing down) seemed unexplainable. There are always consequences to actions - and it's not humanly possible to predict ALL of them.

Grumble: I wasn't one of the the new breed of suburban kids with a Beaver Cleaver family. I knew exactly what "the dark side" of life was - it paid a personal visit to my home in '68... and even at 12 back then, I was talking about the day TSHTF, trying to wrap my head around it. Even though I was the "victim" of that day... I also wound up being the one to try to forge a path/a way to "carry on"... and take care of us.

Took me 40 years, but I recently passed my basic pistol class and finally put to rest my phobia about semi-automatics. I knew back then, I would defend myself and my home and that I WOULD... but the implications of that and the complications morally, personally, emotionally took me a long time to come to grips with. I don't EVER want to go through that particular SHTF scenario ever again. Next time, I will shoot.

Funny thing tho - looking back - it was living through that experience that sort of pushed me to spending most of my life learning all that I have about self-reliance, self-sufficiency... honing those skills. That first SHTF experience most definitely changed a lot about my life, and how I thought, my values.

Alma - I just noticed your location is Kearneysville, WV. I went to college in Shepherdstown; was in the area for 5-8 years. Moved south to Hardy Co. for 10 years... back to Winchester for another 10. Did you know Prof Benedict?
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