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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Canning/Preserving

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Old 04-27-2010, 10:09 PM
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leiloshka leiloshka is offline
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Default How long does homemade yogurt last?

I just made my first batch of yogurt from raw dairy milk and I'm wondering how long it will last in the refrigerator. I've been eating it at a much faster pace than normal because I wasn't sure.

Thank you!
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Old 04-28-2010, 09:58 AM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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I've never really timed it, as it's usually gone before there's any question about it. So, this is just my 2-cents.

Homemade yogurt won't last as long as the commercial stuff because it doesn't have the added preservatives to give a longer storage life.

Homemade will gradually get more sour as it "ages" in the refrigerator. So, one of the storage factors is how long it was held in the yogurt maker after it set. If removed immediately, storage life in the refrigerator will be longer before it gets to the point of being too sour to eat. And, part of this deals with your taste preferences vs being safe to eat. May be safe much longer than your taste buds want to enjoy it.

Just keep on making batches. Won't be long before you'll learn what works for you and your process/method for making it.

Enjoy! Homemade yogurt...... yummmmmm!

Lee
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Old 04-28-2010, 06:27 PM
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That is what I'm doing with the raw milk as well. :-) Just going until it seems bad. I don't usually drink milk nor eat a lot of yogurt. Next time instead of two gallons, maybe I'll buy one gallon or even 1/2 gallon just to take care of the immediate yogurt needs. I'm trying to get the family switched over to it, but kids are hard once they've eaten the store yogurt, etc.
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Old 04-28-2010, 06:41 PM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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Yes, it'll take a while to work out the amount that you and your family will eat over a given time. I usually make a 1/2 gallon at a time. Divide that into various sized containers. I like to use canning jars. The jelly jar size is good for single serving. (No dipping a "dirty" spoon back into a larger container. )

For the kids, try mixing some honey, maple syrup, strawberry preserves, etc. at serving time to help get them converted. If you do the mixing, you can gradually wean them from the extra sugar. Another

Lee
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Old 04-29-2010, 02:08 AM
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It is my understanding, and method, to pasturize the milk in the initial stage of making yogurt. What is the brouhaha of using raw milk if you pasturize it anyway?
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:04 AM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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None that I know of....

While I don't use raw milk, I use INFD powder and well water. So, the same pasturization process is needed to make yogurt. I wouldn't hesitate to use raw milk, if I trusted the source of the milk.

Lee
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Old 05-02-2010, 09:51 PM
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The big deal of raw milk according to the Weston A. Price Foundation is "real milk is a source of complete protein and is loaded with enzymes. Raw milk contains beneficial bacteria that protect against pathogens and contribute to a healthy flora in the intestines. Culturing milk greatly enhances its probiotic and enzyme content, making it a therapeutic food for our digestive system and overall health." - http://www.westonaprice.org/Milk-It-...Body-Good.html

Yes, if the yogurt milk has to be heated first, it does do away with some of these benefits, but I also try to eat as close to the ground as possible whether things are heated or not. I feel better buying from a dairyman where I can see the cows that gave the milk. And, fortunately from this dairy, it's less expensive than store bought also.

So, tomorrow I'll be buying some more raw milk, but a smaller quantity so I can make more yogurt. I'll put it in smaller jars and will add some sweetener to it this time to see if I can woo the kids.
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