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  #21  
Old 06-14-2010, 12:24 PM
nanniegoat Female nanniegoat is offline
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Thanks, I blanch mine about 3 minutes and then rinse maybe I havn't been doing them long enough. Thanks again
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  #22  
Old 06-14-2010, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbemt456 View Post
NotSoFast, I dont know what the matter could be with basil taking long to dry, I dont usually have that problem. But maybe sometimes when the leaves get bunched together on the trays it takes a little longer. I have some drying boxes, about 4 or 5 inches deep with rat wire in the bottom, an sometimes use those to get things started drying. If I have several different herbs that need to be dried at one time, I fill the boxes and put them in the sun an when the dehydrator is empty I just use it to finish drying them completely for storage. This does end up using less electricity too with the same end result.

Have a great day!

stella
I don't know why either Stella. I followed the book that came with the dryer on them, setting the temp at 95 degrees. And the book says it should take between 12 and 18 hours. But so far everything I have dried has taken longer that what that book says, just not nearly as long as the basil. i also had the leaves spread out so that nothing touched any other leaf.

I also dried two trays of celery leaves at the same time, took them out after about 10 hours, and could have done two more sets if I had more celery ready.
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  #23  
Old 06-14-2010, 07:05 PM
sbemt456 Female sbemt456 is offline
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Out of desire for growing space for a few loofa gourds I pulled the onions that were in the bed here in the back yard. Got them all sliced and most of them in the dehydrator. They actually turned out more than I had thought. Needed more trays for my dehydrator to do all of them at once. So I just went ahead and ordered more trays today. Wont help with this batch of onions but I still have a 150 ft row in the big garden to dry. That will make a total of 8 trays for my dehydrator. Also got the bright idea to order the fruit roll up trays as well.

Have a great day!

stella
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  #24  
Old 06-14-2010, 07:12 PM
neparose neparose is offline
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Hi nanniegoat! I do mine in boiling water for about 4 min. untill they turn color. I use a mandolin to make them even slices and boil them in my spagetti pot with the strainer in it. After they turn color, I pull the strainer out of the pot and put it in another pot full of ice water. After they cool down, I pull the strainer out of that pot and put it in the lemon water pot. I dont put the lemon juice in the ice water bowl because I change that frequently, and that would waste alot of lemon juice. Its alot of dipping but for me its easier. After the lemon water dip the strainer sits on a folded towel while I get the slices onto trays. Mine have a slightly yellowish cast to them when they are completely dry. For the lemon juice dip, use 1/4 c. lemon juice to 2 cups water, or 1/2 T. Fruit Fresh to 2 cups water. Keep trying and good luck!
rose
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  #25  
Old 06-14-2010, 08:01 PM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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Default Did my shrimp shells and some thyme and sage

I tossed some sage and thyme in the dryer with the shrimp shells. I don't like running it without filling it.

Anyhow everything looks good. The shrimp got done fastest.

Now I'm on to research more... I'm wondering if you can dehydrate peppers or other veggies that have already been grilled or roasted.. just need to know.
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  #26  
Old 06-14-2010, 09:07 PM
CanNerd CanNerd is offline
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Anything that still has moisture in it can be dehydrated.
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  #27  
Old 06-14-2010, 10:24 PM
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Has anyone dehydrated any frozen corn and green peas? We can oftentimes get sales on 2# (or bigger) bags of frozen whole kernel corn and frozen peas, and since it's been sooooo wet this year, we couldn't get our pea crop in at all.
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  #28  
Old 06-15-2010, 10:21 AM
nanniegoat Female nanniegoat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neparose View Post
Hi nanniegoat! I do mine in boiling water for about 4 min. untill they turn color. I use a mandolin to make them even slices and boil them in my spagetti pot with the strainer in it. After they turn color, I pull the strainer out of the pot and put it in another pot full of ice water. After they cool down, I pull the strainer out of that pot and put it in the lemon water pot. I dont put the lemon juice in the ice water bowl because I change that frequently, and that would waste alot of lemon juice. Its alot of dipping but for me its easier. After the lemon water dip the strainer sits on a folded towel while I get the slices onto trays. Mine have a slightly yellowish cast to them when they are completely dry. For the lemon juice dip, use 1/4 c. lemon juice to 2 cups water, or 1/2 T. Fruit Fresh to 2 cups water. Keep trying and good luck!
rose
Thanks, so much I will try this. Are you using fresh lemon or the kind that comes in the plastic lemon, or ???
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  #29  
Old 06-15-2010, 10:38 AM
neparose neparose is offline
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nanniegoat, I just use the bottled stuff. At present, I think its Real Lemon I have in the pantry.
rose
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  #30  
Old 06-15-2010, 04:05 PM
Junie Female Junie is offline
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I cut back some of the herbs yesterday, blue balsam mint, peppermint, lemon balm, purple basil, and oregano, then dehydrated them. It was a bigger job that I thought it would be. I ended up doing 3 dehydrators full.

Before (the bowl that's full is my bread bowl, the biggest mixing bowl Walmart sells)~



After (Most of the quarts are packed as full as I could pack them, so I didn't have to store more jars)~

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  #31  
Old 06-15-2010, 04:27 PM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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Junie- Great pix! You just paid for all the herb plants you planted. Amazing how much you can save by doing your own herbs. Bet there'll be more coming too.
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  #32  
Old 06-15-2010, 04:31 PM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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Default Corn peas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcrowder View Post
Has anyone dehydrated any frozen corn and green peas? We can oftentimes get sales on 2# (or bigger) bags of frozen whole kernel corn and frozen peas, and since it's been sooooo wet this year, we couldn't get our pea crop in at all.
You can dehydrate those. You don't have to thaw or blanch, just put them in your dehydrate and check them periodically to see how they are going. I love things that free up freezer space.
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  #33  
Old 06-15-2010, 05:57 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
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Default Food Dehydrating

Based on a member's request, please post every thing related to dehydrating in this sticky thread as we "test the waters".

Thanks,
Paul
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  #34  
Old 06-15-2010, 06:37 PM
Junie Female Junie is offline
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Pokeberry Mary, I'm just getting started on the herbs. They're the first thing I do each year. I've got about 1/3 of them done, so far. I'm waiting for the right time to do more. Of course, the ones I already did will have at least a couple more rounds, too, although I might make extracts or something else the next time around.

Then there will be the garden, orchard, and foraged foods. I dehydrate way more than I can because it saves so much on storage space and is lighter on the floors.
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  #35  
Old 06-15-2010, 06:50 PM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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Default What I Like About Dehydrating..

For me its such a simple thing-- cut it up, maybe dip it in something or blanch- as it says.. and dry. Done.

No sterilizing, no cooking down tomatoes for hours-- A simple tomato sauce can be made by just mixing 1/2 cup of dry tomato powder with a cup of water-- then I can 'tweak' it anyway I want to.

I had some dry peppers and tomatoes from our garden about 2 years before we ran into hard times up in Wisconsin and by gosh--we just used the last of it this year-- and it was fine. Just had it in mason jars. That had to be 7 or 8 year old stuff. It was also not a hardship to pack and move it the past 5 moves we made--didn't take much canned food with it was just too much to deal with.

Portability, Ease of processing, Easy to Store, Keeps a long time. Cost is only the electricity--which I'm thinking compared to canning I don't think its going to end up pricier no matter how you figure out.

Not that I don't can things--but I'm doing that less and less--especially since I started dropping things more the past couple years.

How 'bout y'all?
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  #36  
Old 06-15-2010, 11:13 PM
Junie Female Junie is offline
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I don't recall ever having anything explode in the dehydrator.
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  #37  
Old 06-16-2010, 11:32 AM
TEX Female TEX is offline
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Default dehydrating potatoes

My husband is a meat and potatoes guy. We usually end up buying instant or box mix potatoes because just the two of us can't use up a bag of potatoes before they spoil. My excalibur finally arrived yesterday and he really wants to try doing potatoes.

I was wondering if you could cut like french fries, dehydrate, rehydrate and then fry and also wondering about mashed potatoes.

Found this link and am going to try myself.

Yes - you can dehydrate and then fry potatoes and based on some trial and error by someone posting on the link - boil potatoes, mash - do not season - spread thin on dehydrator tray. Freeze - after they are frozen then dehydrate and supposedly they come out quite nice - going to try both methods

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/...e;topic=9858.0
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  #38  
Old 06-16-2010, 05:02 PM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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Default Having Fun with Dehydrating Sauces...

Salsa, Spaghetti Sauce--any sauce that doesn't have meat or oil in it basically is getting a trial run in my dehydrator. I'm not only looking to rehydrate them as sauces but even more so looking to put them in rice and bean type dishes cooked with homemade broths and stocks.

Also found a tip out--if you want to brown and dehydrate beef-- add some bread crumbs when you are browning it and supposedly it won't be so tough. Haven't tried it but seems plausible.

I'm enjoying also looking at my leftovers with a more squinty eye now... if I don't want to eat it soon, I used to toss things in the freezer but now I see that many of the leftovers could be dried for use later in some other dish.

No more stuff hiding in the fridge.
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  #39  
Old 06-16-2010, 05:04 PM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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good point! I've never blown up anything in mine either.. but then I haven't tried every possibility yet.. like say drying the odd leftover bit of dynamite.
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  #40  
Old 06-16-2010, 05:36 PM
sbemt456 Female sbemt456 is offline
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Mary if you had leftover bits of dynamite you didnt do THAT job quite right.
My dehydrator is again loaded with onions to make onions flakes. I already have a half gallon jar 2/3 full of dried onions. It takes about 3 of those jars to do us all year. Can ya tell we use a lot of onions?
I have more trays ordered for my dehydrator and hope they get here soon. I have some herbs that need to be dried before they flower. May have to put a hold on the onions to do the basil and chamomile. We shall see.

Have a great day!

stella
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