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Tractors Big ones, small ones, old ones, new ones, buying, using, fixing...you get the idea.

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  #21  
Old 12-12-2012, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Musky View Post
I spent a great deal of my childhood in the seat of one of those. In a good day, you could plow 10 acres with it.
Simple and reliable. I would suggest doing the 12 volt conversion. Really helps on cold weather starts and is very simple to do.
my seat was against the fender while dad drove or on the wheat drill or on the dump rake.
I got a 8n converted to 12V. that and a overrun clutch is really all you need. just dont forget to turn the gas off when you stop for awhile.
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  #22  
Old 12-12-2012, 08:25 PM
jlmissouri jlmissouri is offline
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I agree with the 12V conversion and an overrunning clutch. I would also recomend an electronic ignition conversion from Petronix with a high output coil. My spark plugs stay clean and my 8N fires up better than most vehicles I have driven due to the electronic ignition conversion.
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  #23  
Old 12-15-2012, 12:01 PM
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Did the conversion (12v and EI) about 5 years ago. It is nice not haveing to mess with points every year. Since my 49 was fit with the belly mower, she has become the yard queen. I use the 841 for all farm chores but with the shrinking yard and the growing garden, she may come out of retirment.
There are manythings to say about new vs old, but I can still pull a new tractor of equal HP all over the yard
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  #24  
Old 12-15-2012, 05:10 PM
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If you put quality parts in the 6V system you will get many years between having to touch the distributor. The problem is putting in Chi-Com made crap that burns up in months rather than years.
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  #25  
Old 12-16-2012, 12:53 AM
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You're right but there are no new 6v generstors made, only rebuilt ones that cost more than rhe conversion. There are a lot of other reasons, better starting. Brighter lights . You can use all auto type stuff to include jump starts. Only reason I know to stay at.6 v is to restore a 8n. But if you using it as a working tractor i reccomend the conversion.
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  #26  
Old 12-19-2012, 05:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
Along with the dedicated 8N forum there are several other compact tractor forums that might have useful info.

Tractordata.com for tec info.

Mytractor.com
Tractorbynet.com
Green tractor forum (John Deere)

Classics like the old Fords etc are fun and useful. Maybe not as versatile as newer stuff with some of the newer hydraulic and pto implements available. But like a classic car, fun. And they can be found in very good shape and nicely restored for not a lot of money.

Good luck


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Oh give me a break! Green paint???? It's way over rated and surely over priced. I'd say a little Ford, a Fergie or a Massey would be economically the very best bet. After all, Harry Ferguson invented the 3 point so they've had what you need for over half a century. Took JD forever to catch up. For the money, green paint ain't worth it. IMHO
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  #27  
Old 12-19-2012, 05:25 AM
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The old Fords were good tractors, they excelled because they had good gearing in their transmissions...only 4 gears but they were geared the right speed for just about anything you needed to do, from logging (1st gear) to running up the road with a rake going to the next hayfield.

They did well with a bucket since they were all hydraulic at the time, but steering was an issue, and of course 4wd was only available through an after market kit.

Yep they were a good tractor, but if you lost the 3 point hitch on them...well you just did not have a Ford Tractor without one, and they were hard to work on. The loss of our 3 point hitch and too many tries at getting it fixed, done the ole girl in and we bought a new Kubota to replace her.
Kubota??? To fix a good American tractor? Is there something wrong with that

Hey, both Fergie and Fords were often fitted with a Sherman overdrive or what they call a step transmission. I have one in my Fergie. That changes your tractor to 12 forward gears and three Reverse. With that addition, your mighty might is truly a mighty might. Unbelieveable what she'll pull in underdrive and the speed of 4th in overdrive will truly scare the socks off you going down the hwy. You'll want to make sure your steering and all is tight. Grandpa bought my TO30 Fergie new and had that step transmission put in. It was the cat's pajamas at the time and I still don't know what tractor I'd trade it for. She's a mighty mite. I maybe would like power steering but other than that, she lacks absolutely nothing. It's my inheritance and I plan to pass it to one of my sons.

It's the only tractor we have left that Grandpa bought new. She's worth four to six times now what Grandpa paid for her in 1951 and she's a nice soft gray, I don't have to look at that ugly green paint that some folks do.
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  #28  
Old 12-22-2012, 07:01 AM
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Sadly, it does not matter what the paint color is any more, it is hard to find a tractor built in the USA anymore. Even John Deere and New Holland Sub-Compacts are built over-seas now. :-(

I love my Kubota and would buy another tomorrow without batting an eye. Even at 2000 hours, the resale value is still high and at the end of its life, it will be like the Ford's; worth more then it was bought new. The thing is you just cannot do that with Ford's today...mainly because Ford Tractors are no longer built! :-)

Over the years there have been a variety of tractors that I have liked. We just turned back a 9484 New Holland that was on lease which was a shame; the price of milk right now means things are tight and we just could not pay the lease on it. It is the only tractor that can drag the disc harrow so I am not sure what we are going to do next Spring. But that was a nice tractor. It would have been better with a 3 point hitch and PTO,

One of my favorites is a 8830 Ford. Just the name says its old since Ford no longer makes a tractor. At 185 HP it had enough power to mow, plow (7 bottom) and feed up cows. Having a power-shift was really nice in the first two applications because when you got to a corner mowing you could knock it down two gears, make the corner then bump it up along the straighter sections. The same with plowing, you could drop it down and manipulate the hydraulics when going over ledge rock. I admit it could use more weight on the front end and get more traction to the front wheels. It was a cheap tractor though and the engines were weak. Thankfully we are now getting another engine put in ours and she will live another day. We need a good mid-sized tractor with power-shift. I liked the 9684 New Holland because of its size, but without a PTO or 3 point hitch...well it was just not designed for mid-sized work and only worked well at what it did do...pull and have hydraulics!

The Old Ford's did have an after-market 4 wheel drive system that could be installed. It was powered by the PTO shaft and was geared to be the same as the tractor. My Grandfather had a chance to buy one but life on a farm means there is always other things to spend money on, and he spent the rest of his life wishing he had bought it. 4wd on a Ford would have been an incredible machine. I even like the 9n Millennium Edition that NH makes; beautiful looking tractor with 4x4 and power steering...a nice machine I am sure, but who could pay 40 grand for a tractor that size? We did have a set of half-tracks for our Ford Tractor though and they are still kicking around somewhere. With those on, you could really go in the snow which is what my Grandfather did a lot of. You can get them purpose built now for Kubota's and other tractors. I think Caterpillar has the best tracked tractor out there, the Challenger I think it is called and can be had for reasonable prices now that they have been out for awhile.

Well I must go; I can talk tractors all day long.
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  #29  
Old 12-22-2012, 09:41 PM
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All valid points. My 1946 Ford 2n still gets the job done for most chores. The only thing the Ford's lacked without the Howard step down transmission was the ability to rototill..the ground speed is just too fast except for the sandiest and loosest of garden soils. Sherman also made a step up and step down transmission...you can occasionally find a combo trans but they bring premium prices. The N series tractors are still popular today because they are simple and durable.

I'd still like a new hydrostatic trans compact tractor with a loader though.
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  #30  
Old 12-24-2012, 02:11 PM
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I'd still like a new hydrostatic trans compact tractor with a loader though.
----------------
YES....... Most people who use a FEL with a hydrostatic tranny for the first time are VERY impressed of how easy it is to use.

New toys...... I mean tools.... are fun to work with........

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  #31  
Old 12-28-2012, 07:09 AM
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How do the hydro-tranny work during extended field hours though?

It is an honest question. I have only used a hydro-tranny on the bigger tractors and they can struggle under heavy, constant load.

For instance, the 8830 Ford struggles pulling the 7 bottom plow. As everyone knows the faster you go, the better the rolled sod, yet with this tractor, if I ran it in 9th gear, after half an hour the tranny temperature would climb so much that it would lose viscosity and lose speed and power. It was pretty clear it was better to run in 8th gear, or even 7th gear and pull all day long then get the higher speed I really wanted.

The same thing happened with a 850B John Deere Dozer. At the beginning of the day you could not stay on the machine it was so fast, but by night fall the tractor would barely get out of its own way the oil was so hot.

But these were 185 hp tractors designed for all day pulling and yet their heat exchangers just were not up to the task. I wonder what the slosh drive sub-compacts would be like running a bush hog all day, or mowing fields...something with a high load for extended hours? I would think for back and forth work like using a loader to move gravel out of a bank, or moving stuff with pallet forks a slosh drive would be ideal, but I am wondering if a person would be better off with a standard tranny if they intended to do lots of field work?
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  #32  
Old 12-28-2012, 09:57 PM
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By looking on "TractorData.com" I see the Ford 8830 is 20 year old equipment now. I'm sure the technology has improved over that time.
How many hours are on that machine ?

I have no experience with a slosh drive over 25hp. But my 1987 JD855 only had a little less than 2 hours a month on it when I got it. In the 2 1/2 years I've had it, I've put 25% of the hours on it that it has now. It don't run fast, but it is a total brute for it's size and weight.........

One way to look at it is, a paid for 20 year old, 7th gear tractor is worth more than a mortgage on a newer 10th gear tractor............

Good luck
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  #33  
Old 12-29-2012, 08:50 AM
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Yeah it is an old machine and not well made, but that was at the end of Ford's tractor building days so it makes sense. I don't know how many hours it has on it as I have not been in the cab awhile; it blew its motor and is in the process of being rebuilt. I say all this because upon rebuilding the motor, we found out that it does not have replaceable sleeves, so you must bore it over-sized and go that rebuilding route. Our tractor is the third in line at the machine shop if that tells you anything about these tractors (inexpensive and poorly made). We used it a lot though so we feel its loss on the farm. :-(

We have had a tough time with tractors this past year. We really invested heavily in equipment 10-12 years ago and took over a lot of ground so we could milk more cows. I mean there is no sense to get bigger if you can't feed them so that was the plan. That worked well but our farm was overcrowded with cows and so a few years ago we got a much bigger barn. Now we have an incredible barn, BUT our equipment has aged, so now it is time to go back and invest in equipment again. A little tough in this economy, but we were told to hang in there by the Maine Milk Commission as milk prices are going to hit record highs in a few months. It is just the way it goes with farming. In a few years we will have to increase the number of cows we milk...economy of scale you know!
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  #34  
Old 09-05-2013, 02:05 PM
mohican Male mohican is offline
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Ford 8N kinda the tractor version of the Model T. Good for it's time.

No Live PTO
No Live Hydraulics

No thank you
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  #35  
Old 11-03-2013, 11:37 PM
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Ford 8N kinda the tractor version of the Model T. Good for it's time.

No Live PTO
No Live Hydraulics

No thank you
Neither did some of the 1970s Ford tractors.......

My 1940 9N is still 6V +ground. Starts when it is -10F. Can be fixed with simple wrenches and screwdrivers. Runs all day turning a 5ft brushhog on a 7 gal tank of gas.

Cost me $1000 25 years ago, and came with: back blade, rear scoop, 2-bottom plow, spring tooth harrow, tire chains, stabilizer bars, lift stay chains.

Is made of steel/cast/copper that I can fix; no plastic. I can fix the wiring , ignition, fuel system, motor, transmission , differential, and hydraulic pump... with simple tools. E.g. No fuel pump, gravity is more reliable.

Oh yes, after 73 years, I can still get parts, if in the rare chance I need them!
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  #36  
Old 11-04-2013, 04:12 AM
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PICTURES......
This section needs more pictures....
Regardless of the paint color of the tractor.....
KnowwhatImean.....

+++
Ready for a bath.....
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  #37  
Old 11-04-2013, 04:27 PM
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I had a 8N for many years. Sometimes still wished I had kept it around.

Since most homesteaders are a jack of all trades being able to fix it at home is a big plus.

The week I sold it for $2000.00 I probably could have sold 10 of them. It was rough looking but mechanically sound. Sold it to the first person who showed up. It did include a brush hog, and back blade.
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  #38  
Old 11-04-2013, 11:18 PM
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Still love my 46 model 2N. Had it seven years and it's cost me 1 fuel bowl, 1 battery, 1 hydraulic fluid change in maintenance. Shreds 9 acres easily, plows, and grades. No payments..what more could a guy want?
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  #39  
Old 11-05-2013, 12:22 AM
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Default Wife on the 2N

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  #40  
Old 11-05-2013, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Plowpoint View Post
Yeah it is an old machine and not well made, but that was at the end of Ford's tractor building days so it makes sense. I don't know how many hours it has on it as I have not been in the cab awhile; it blew its motor and is in the process of being rebuilt. I say all this because upon rebuilding the motor, we found out that it does not have replaceable sleeves, so you must bore it over-sized and go that rebuilding route. Our tractor is the third in line at the machine shop if that tells you anything about these tractors (inexpensive and poorly made). We used it a lot though so we feel its loss on the farm. :-(

We have had a tough time with tractors this past year. We really invested heavily in equipment 10-12 years ago and took over a lot of ground so we could milk more cows. I mean there is no sense to get bigger if you can't feed them so that was the plan. That worked well but our farm was overcrowded with cows and so a few years ago we got a much bigger barn. Now we have an incredible barn, BUT our equipment has aged, so now it is time to go back and invest in equipment again. A little tough in this economy, but we were told to hang in there by the Maine Milk Commission as milk prices are going to hit record highs in a few months. It is just the way it goes with farming. In a few years we will have to increase the number of cows we milk...economy of scale you know!

funny I always thought that all 2, 9 and 8 N's had replaceable sleeves.,
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