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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Canning/Preserving

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  #1  
Old 02-10-2011, 07:31 PM
Aseries Aseries is offline
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Default Canned Sausages

I was wondering how does everyone else can sausages, either links or patties. I tried doing some last night for the first time. I bought some packs at the store on sale just to try. I put them in half pints I think they are, tossed the links in standing up, it held about 10 to 12 sausages.

I decided to try with some beef broth. They came out ok, I'm eating a jar right now to see how they came out. The liquid looks yummy. I figured some broth that way I could make some soup out of the liquid for work. The links are very tender, and I think cooking them first didnt do anything.

Anyone else do sausages... Anyone can weiners.... wondering if they explode or break open like when you over boil them on the stove... lol

thanks
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  #2  
Old 02-11-2011, 10:33 AM
Mike LI Male Mike LI is offline
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I read somewhere that if the sausages have sage in them canning them can cause them to go bitter. Not sure if fennel would effect em, I would think so.

Hot dogs or the little wieners ( which I wrap in my own dough and make pigs in a blanket when my son and I watch football, love em with TONS of mustard!! ) would be pretty awesome to can. I may give that a shot tonight.
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  #3  
Old 02-11-2011, 10:16 PM
Aseries Aseries is offline
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I dont put spice in the sausages anyway, and thanks to Jackie Clay I'm aware of the sage n spice issue. Was just hoping someone else canned sausages or patties, wanted to hear someone elses ideas. Though those little weiners sound good to eat right now lol.

I think I'll try presure canning them to see if they blow up lol or mushroom out like they do when you over cook them...
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  #4  
Old 02-12-2011, 07:19 AM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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Prick the casing or cut off the ends to keep them from "blowing up".

I used to buy a canned link sausage in a great broth. For the life of me I can't remember the name of it. The links had been cut into pieces about the length of a vienna sausage. Dump the sausages and broth in a pan and heat. Sop up the broth with a biscuit. Yummmm..... good sopping!

I think it's still sold. It'll be in the canned good section with other canned meats. Had to stop buying due to the salt content. If I can remember, I'll check the next time I'm at the store. Buying a can of these could be a guideline on how to do a variation at home. (How to cut, spices, etc.)

Re: canning bulk sausage. My Mom used to do it. Yuk. What I'm about to tell you is NOT recommended. I don't think you'd want to do it anyway from a flavor and quality standpoint.

She fried up pork sausage patties, until well done. Stacked the patties in a jar. Poured the hot sausage grease over them. Turned the jars upside down so the hot grease could seal the jars. Jars were not turned rightside up until the next day after the grease was congealed.

Later, the patties were fished out of the globs of grease and "fried" again until they here heated through. Results were greasy and way over cooked. About the only thing it was good for was to flavor sausage gravy biscuits. And, it wouldn't keep long because the grease would go rancid.

Looking back in time and forward, too. If canning sausage was the only way to keep fresh sausage for an extended period of time, if the outdoor temps wouldn't allow air curing and dehydrating, I'd can the pork that makes up the sausage for other uses.

BTW, I have a bag of real country cured sausage in the refrigerator now. Found a neighbor who makes it the old fashioned way and stuffs into muslin bags. Gotta try it in the next day or so before freezing in meal sized chunks. (Don't have a way to keep it hung here.) That sausage has a flavor that can't be duplicated in any other way.

Lee
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  #5  
Old 02-12-2011, 03:37 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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I have not canned any, but I aim to try out MIL's method. Sterilize jars and lids, keep hot. fry up sausage, have hot lard on hand and be very careful. wear a pprotective apron. They used to stack the sausage right out of the skillet into the hot jar until full, then fill up with hot lard, put on lids and rings, and that is it. I know there will be lots of protest, but it makes sense to me. why should i bother with pressur canning? How hot does that get? How hot does the meat get fresh out of the skillet, and how hot is the lard? I would say a lot hotter than the pressurizing ever will get.
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  #6  
Old 02-12-2011, 04:55 PM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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That's the way Mom did it, except she didn't use lard. Sausage gave plently of grease (drippings) to put in the jars. No need to completely fill the jars with grease. She put it about 1/4 - 1/3 up the jar. Put on lids and turned them upside down. The heat sealed the lids. The hardened grease formed an additional sealing layer.

If you try this, I'd recommend that you do just one jar to start. You may not like the results. I didn't. Other than the spice flavor, very little comparision to freshly fried patties. Think about a leftover WELL DONE patty, warmed over in a pan of grease. Personally, it isn't worth the effort considering the fairly short shelf life. I'm estimating around 6 months or less, depending on storage conditions.

Now to play Devil's advocate for a moment.

Even if everything is sterilized, including the utensils used, there's no way to keep airborne bacteria and fungi spores out of the jars. This is the open kettle method of canning.

This sealing process doesn't expell air in the same manner as regular canning, thus a true vacuum seal isn't formed. The more air in the jar, the shorter the shelf life.

Pressure canning holds the temperature at 240 degrees, when canning at 11 lbs. That temperature is held for the duration of the timing part of the process. Even if the sausage itself is at 350 (recommended frying temp), the temp of the sausage starts dropping as soon as it's removed from the pan. Same thing for the grease (or melted lard, which may be at much less than 350 when just melted.).

Thus, the temperature of these won't stay at 240 or above for an hour and a half. Give or take some, in that amount of time the contents of the jars will be close to, if not at, room temperature.

Finally, this can be a dangerous operation. One slip and hot grease is everywhere. If there's too much variance between the temp of the jars and the grease, the jars can shatter. Over the years, I've made a mess from time to time while doing regular canning. Jar slip, gets knocked over, jar lifter didn't grasp firmly, etc. That was a mess to clean up. If Murphy visits, it'll be even worse with hot grease.

Devil's advocate hat for those new to canning is now off.

For all of the above, is why I haven't canned pork bulk sausage, nor eaten any since I was a teenager.

Am watching the experiments and comments on canning link sausage, using a pressure canner, as this may be something I'd like to put on my pantry shelves, too.

Lee
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  #7  
Old 02-12-2011, 11:03 PM
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dgr Female dgr is offline
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I can sausage patties all the time. Just lightly brown, pack into wide mouth pints, pour about 2T sausage grease over and pressure can 75 mins at 10#. It's not as good as fresh(what is?) but still comes in real handy around here. I use it alot for pizza too.
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Old 02-17-2011, 01:04 PM
tacmotusn tacmotusn is offline
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Any way other than pressure canning sausage links or patties is not safe. Botulism is nothing to play with. Univ. of Ga says sausage may be pressure canned safely in Quarts 10lb 90minutes / Pints 10lb 75 minutes.
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  #9  
Old 02-17-2011, 08:50 PM
Aseries Aseries is offline
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I pressure can just about everything in Pints or half pints or the tiny ones. I do all the meats as the book says. So far I havent died or got sick. The only thing I ever pressure canned that I didnt like was shrimp. It just didnt seem right so I chucked the whole lot I did. It didnt loose a seal, nothing was discolored, it just had a weird shrimpy odour.

But back to sausages. I am going to to try canning them dry in the jar to see how that goes next. Just for the fun of it. Plus I'm going to Can up some more bacon...
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  #10  
Old 03-02-2011, 08:21 PM
CountryBertha Female CountryBertha is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCLee View Post
That's the way Mom did it, except she didn't use lard. Sausage gave plently of grease (drippings) to put in the jars. No need to completely fill the jars with grease. She put it about 1/4 - 1/3 up the jar. Put on lids and turned them upside down. The heat sealed the lids. The hardened grease formed an additional sealing layer.

If you try this, I'd recommend that you do just one jar to start. You may not like the results. I didn't. Other than the spice flavor, very little comparision to freshly fried patties. Think about a leftover WELL DONE patty, warmed over in a pan of grease. Personally, it isn't worth the effort considering the fairly short shelf life. I'm estimating around 6 months or less, depending on storage conditions.

Now to play Devil's advocate for a moment.

Even if everything is sterilized, including the utensils used, there's no way to keep airborne bacteria and fungi spores out of the jars. This is the open kettle method of canning.

This sealing process doesn't expell air in the same manner as regular canning, thus a true vacuum seal isn't formed. The more air in the jar, the shorter the shelf life.

Pressure canning holds the temperature at 240 degrees, when canning at 11 lbs. That temperature is held for the duration of the timing part of the process. Even if the sausage itself is at 350 (recommended frying temp), the temp of the sausage starts dropping as soon as it's removed from the pan. Same thing for the grease (or melted lard, which may be at much less than 350 when just melted.).

Thus, the temperature of these won't stay at 240 or above for an hour and a half. Give or take some, in that amount of time the contents of the jars will be close to, if not at, room temperature.

Finally, this can be a dangerous operation. One slip and hot grease is everywhere. If there's too much variance between the temp of the jars and the grease, the jars can shatter. Over the years, I've made a mess from time to time while doing regular canning. Jar slip, gets knocked over, jar lifter didn't grasp firmly, etc. That was a mess to clean up. If Murphy visits, it'll be even worse with hot grease.

Devil's advocate hat for those new to canning is now off.

For all of the above, is why I haven't canned pork bulk sausage, nor eaten any since I was a teenager.

Am watching the experiments and comments on canning link sausage, using a pressure canner, as this may be something I'd like to put on my pantry shelves, too.

Lee
I wonder, after reading some of the postings on this subject, if what yall are thinking about is called "larding". We never canned sausage or pork or put lard or grease of any kind in anything that was being canned. Sausage, ham and bacon were smoked, salted and sugared and hung to drip. It wasn't much good because it was too salty. Pork, however, was sliced and fried fresh after harvesting, then lard was cleaned and melted. A layer of lard was put in the bottom of the larding barrel, then the fried pork was put in one layer on the lard, and you kept layering lard and pork until lard covered the top. Extra lard that was cleaned properly was put in canning jars or a metal bucket with a lid for storage. I don't think properly cleaned lard ever goes bad. When you dug the larded pork out of the barrel, it was taken to the house and cooked through in the oven or a frying pan even though it was already cooked. We used to sneak chunks out of the barrel to eat.

Pork was the only meat that was larded, and it was strictly for winter storage. This was a lot of work but it was indeed very good. The lard used in larding was used in baking and frying other foods, and when the lard got "too used" it was made into soap.
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