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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Canning/Preserving

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  #1  
Old 02-10-2011, 08:23 PM
curmy curmy is offline
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Default canning tomatoes in oven?

I was talking with a coworker about canning different meats and vegetables today and she told me that she puts her filled quart jars of cooked tomatoes in the oven at 250 degrees for a couple of hours. She says they seal perfectly.

Anyone else here of this? Pros and cons on doing it this way will be greatly appreciated. Thanks alot!

Regards,
Curmy
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  #2  
Old 02-10-2011, 09:23 PM
TEX Female TEX is offline
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At one point in time it was considered safe to bring just get your tomatoes really hot on the stove, pour into jars and seal - they had to be hot enough to seal good. Now many tomatoes don't have high enough acid content to be considered save any other way than pressure canning.
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Old 02-11-2011, 12:07 AM
oldtimer oldtimer is offline
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Lot of oldtimers did it that way. Had a neighbor lady always canned like that then one day she was taking her pan of jars out of the oven and several of them blew up as she was taken them out, she was scalded terribly and all cut up from the glass that blew all over.

I wouldn't recommend it at all for safety reasons. Water bath works just fine. Better to be safe than sorry.
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Old 02-11-2011, 05:29 AM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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Oven isn't considered to be safe from both the glass factor and making sure what's in the jar is safe to eat.

Quote:
Oven Canning Oven-canning is extremely hazardous. The oven canning method involves placing jars in an oven and heating. In oven canning, product temperatures never exceed the boiling point, and uniform heat penetration cannot be assured. It is, therefore, not considered safe to use for home canning. Because this process fails to destroy the many bacteria, including the spores of Clostridium botulinum, it can cause the food to become toxic during storage. Also, canning jars are not designed for intense dry heat and may explode resulting in serious cuts or burns. http://www.pickyourown.org/cannersnotrecommended.htm
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Is it safe to process food in the oven?
No. This can be dangerous because the temperature will vary according to the accuracy of oven regulators and circulation of heat. Dry heat is very slow in penetrating into jars of food. Also, jars explode easily in the oven. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/questions/FAQ_canning.html
Now a FWIW....

I switched to pressure canning tomatoes many years ago. If memory serves, in the early 90's, testing was done of the newer hybrid lower acid tomatoes. Some varietys just don't have enough acid in them to deactivate bolulism spores. Without extensive research, there's no way of knowing, for sure, which hybrids are safe for traditional waterbath. If a neighbor gives a bushel of tomatoes, often there's no way of knowing what they planted either.

When waterbath canning tomatoes, additional acid is needed to bring the pH into the safe range. One of the best uses there is for store bought lemon juice in a bottle, as I don't care for it for other food/recipes uses. (Good for cleaning copper, BTW.)

Hope this helps.
Lee
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Old 02-11-2011, 08:58 AM
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momma_to_seven_chi Female momma_to_seven_chi is offline
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It depends on the tomatoes.
Back when we were first married, my pastor's wife came over to teach me to can tomatoes. She did it the way she always had, clean jars in oven, boil tomatoes, put tomatoes in clean jars, return to oven to heat, then they seal. And they looked great! That's how she learned to do it as a young woman, so she was teaching me.
About two weeks later, all these beautiful jars of tomatoes were on the shelves in the basement, and I heard a bang. Went downstairs to see if the washer was off level or something, and saw tomatoes all over the shelf and floor. Most jars were bulging on the top, or really nasty looking, a a few had popped the top and blasted all over.

She did this to can her tomatoes for years before that, and probably years after that too. But my tomatoes were all bad and ended up being tossed out. It had to be the difference in the tomatoes we were growing in our own gardens.


I just wanted to add, that I have never canned tomatoes like that again. I used a WBC for years, just fine. I have pressure canners now, but I did use my WB for many years. I just didn't use the oven again.
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Old 02-11-2011, 01:27 PM
Aamylf Aamylf is offline
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I add my two cents that it is never okay to can in the oven.

People used to just turn jars upside to seal and that isn't safe either. With so much excellent information on how to be absolutely positively safe with your canning, there is no acceptable reason to take a chance with oven canning.
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Old 02-11-2011, 08:38 PM
curmy curmy is offline
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Thanks for all the good advice! I'm gonna take it!!

Regards,
Curmy
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Old 02-11-2011, 09:14 PM
Aseries Aseries is offline
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Now there is another reason never to plant hybrid tomatoes, or not buy them if you can help it.

But I wouldnt be surprise if we loose the heirloom tomato varieties one day...
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Old 02-14-2011, 01:18 AM
JarDude Male JarDude is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtimer View Post
Lot of oldtimers did it that way.
LOL My Mom still does it that way.
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  #10  
Old 09-12-2013, 09:58 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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Lets bring this forward again. My wonderful Sis always oven cans tomatoes and tomato sauce, and she is lovely to share them with me. But they scare me, knowing all the bacteria might not have been cooked out.

So...can I pressure can "already canned" tomato stuff? They're sealed OK... but I really don't want food poisoning next winter!
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