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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Education/Homeschool

Education/Homeschool Homeschooling, adult education, teaching self-reliance, and anything else education-related.

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  #1  
Old 02-28-2011, 01:51 PM
qwerty Male qwerty is offline
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Default What does a homeschooled students diploma

say on it. Like mine says Barren County High School along with signatures from the Principal and Superintendent. Just curious.
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  #2  
Old 03-01-2011, 10:00 AM
Mom5farmboys Mom5farmboys is offline
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I thought that homeschooled kids just took the GED when it was time to graduate?
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Old 03-01-2011, 10:41 AM
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You don't have to give a 'piece of paper' if you don't want too. But if you choose to make / buy a diploma, then you can put anything on it you want. It is a blank canvas.

I did not have my kids take the GED....if they chose to enlist, because of the GED that puts them automatically at the lowest rank.
My kids took the ACT and SAT tests and that satisfied every college they applied and were accepted too.

My oldest wanted a diploma. So, my dh and I printed it, signed it, and dated it. It just said that she had completed home education. We didn't 'make up a school name'.
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Old 03-01-2011, 04:53 PM
debbie-bountiful Female debbie-bountiful is offline
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My daughters never took the GED they just took the ACT and went straight to their Universities. Didn't even need to go to a junior college first. All the Universities care about is that ACT score.
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Old 03-01-2011, 07:25 PM
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My SIL sent copies of all her records for her son to some school in Maine and they sent him a diploma from that High School.
They live in Washington State.
I could find out where she sent it if you are interested.
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  #6  
Old 03-01-2011, 09:08 PM
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My SIL sent copies of all her records for her son to some school in Maine and they sent him a diploma from that High School.
They live in Washington State.
I could find out where she sent it if you are interested.
I would recommend that anyone who is home schooled or homeschooling checks this out. While some schools may only need act/sat scores other schools and certain jobs require a diploma/GED for licensure.I also believe the US Military requires proof of HS to enlist.

Remember you decided to home school your child and you should also take the responsibly to make sure your decision does not effect his or her future. There is a differnece between a GED and a real Diploma
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  #7  
Old 03-02-2011, 03:04 AM
oldtimer oldtimer is offline
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You don't have to give a 'piece of paper' if you don't want too. But if you choose to make / buy a diploma, then you can put anything on it you want. It is a blank canvas.

I did not have my kids take the GED....if they chose to enlist, because of the GED that puts them automatically at the lowest rank.
My kids took the ACT and SAT tests and that satisfied every college they applied and were accepted too.

My oldest wanted a diploma. So, my dh and I printed it, signed it, and dated it. It just said that she had completed home education. We didn't 'make up a school name'.
We have always had a "school name". We had diplomas made for two of our children, with a graduation program and all at our church. That seemed important to the kids' great grandmother. After she passed away, the other kids didn't want all the fuss.

Lucky the ACT was good enough for the shools your kids applied to. Our state won't accept any home schooled kid that doesn't have a GED and we have the highest GED requirements in the country. I actually think they should make the high school kids take the same test. I wonder how many of them could pass it. All they have to do is put in four years of time and show up to school and get the almighty piece of paper. It doesn't mean a thing about what kind of education the kid got, it just proves they sat through four years of classes.

The ACT does show if a kid has learned anything. Too bad not every state will accept that as evidence of a young person's ability to do college work.

Also, I believe you're right about the military and their requirements.
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  #8  
Old 03-02-2011, 08:59 AM
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I thought that homeschooled kids just took the GED when it was time to graduate?
No. Most will not do that. It is not a good idea at all, in fact. I would highly discourage it to any homeschooler.

A homeschool diploma is as good as a public school one, and will get a student the same federal college aid and loans as any public school diploma. Depending on the state you live in a homeschool is a private school or a homeschool.

Different states have different rules. In most "private" school states your diploma simply has your "school name" and signatures of the parents. If you live in a state that signifies homeschools as separate from private schools then the diploma says "homeschool" as the name rather the name you have named your private home school.

HSLDA sells beautiful diploma blanks with gold leaf and a casing that you can fill out with your homeschool/private school name and information. Some people simply buy diploma blanks from Christian book stores like the ones churches use in sunday schools. And some people simply print them on their computers. We bought our kids the pretty ones from HSLDA and filled them out in calligraphy.
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  #9  
Old 03-02-2011, 09:05 AM
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We have always had a "school name". We had diplomas made for two of our children, with a graduation program and all at our church. That seemed important to the kids' great grandmother. After she passed away, the other kids didn't want all the fuss.

Lucky the ACT was good enough for the shools your kids applied to. Our state won't accept any home schooled kid that doesn't have a GED and we have the highest GED requirements in the country. I actually think they should make the high school kids take the same test. I wonder how many of them could pass it. All they have to do is put in four years of time and show up to school and get the almighty piece of paper. It doesn't mean a thing about what kind of education the kid got, it just proves they sat through four years of classes.

The ACT does show if a kid has learned anything. Too bad not every state will accept that as evidence of a young person's ability to do college work.

Also, I believe you're right about the military and their requirements.
I would check with www.hslda.com and make sure that it's "legal" that they can force a GED. Once you get to hslda.com, click on your state. It will give you all the information that is legal in that state, and what the state 'can' demand of a home schooling parent.

The Army (don't know about the other branches) Now accepts home schooled kids, and their diplomas, and does not force them to take the GED. Home Education is legal in all 50 states, and if an employer / branch of the military demands a diploma, then you can purchase diplomas on line, then take them and have the Notarized, there by making them a 'legal' document. The college my oldest went to, a Culinary/Art school, wanted a diploma, notarized, in BLUE ink (because I brought it in black and they made me do it again) before they would accept her. What a joke. My son has been accepted into colleges all over the mid-west and not ONE of them has been silly like this "arts" school. Whatev, just be prepared!!
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Last edited by Laura; 03-02-2011 at 09:11 AM.
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  #10  
Old 03-02-2011, 09:49 AM
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I believe the military does accept homeschool diplomas and actively recruits the kids too. I don't know of a university that won't accept them. Things have changed drastically during the last 25ys for homeschoolers. Government schools are now considered "second class" to private schools in many ways. GEDs are a detriment not a good thing at all.
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  #11  
Old 03-02-2011, 02:06 PM
Paddy Male Paddy is offline
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There is a differnece between a GED and a real Diploma
What, pray tell, would that be?
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Old 03-02-2011, 02:10 PM
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GEDs are a detriment not a good thing at all.
How is it detrimental?
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:08 PM
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How is it detrimental?
to some, a ged shouts "i did not graduate from high school" -

to some, a good act score shouts "i'm able to do well in college" -

doesn't matter if it's fair or if it's accurate but it is a not uncommon perception - often on the part of some pencil-pushing "decision-maker" - one of life's minor obstacles to handle -
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:35 AM
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to some, a ged shouts "i did not graduate from high school" -

to some, a good act score shouts "i'm able to do well in college" -

doesn't matter if it's fair or if it's accurate but it is a not uncommon perception - often on the part of some pencil-pushing "decision-maker" - one of life's minor obstacles to handle -
GED also says "I quit / I was too disruptive to stay so I got thrown out"
GED is poison if you are trying to join the armed forces.

It's unfortunate the GED has such a bad rap. In my humble opinion, if a kid goes to such lengths to study for, take and pass it, then obviously they are trying to make right decisions.....and that to me is commendable.

ACT however, says "I am smart". EVEN THOUGH you can take a class, on how to take the test. EVEN THOUGH they tell you to GUESS if you don't know the answer.......
I had my kids take it 3 times. I wanted to make sure they "knew" what they knew.
Each time, my oldest child, her score went up. My son, the 2nd and 3rd test had the exact same score. Which was 2 points higher than his first test. My youngest has taken hers once and will take it again this spring.

ACT scores (as well as SAT) can open "scholarship" doors. At community colleges, it "waves" the entrance exam process.

For us, the ACT/SAT have been our 'proof' to the system that our home educated kids can do the work required of them in college.
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Old 03-03-2011, 06:11 PM
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I believe the military does accept homeschool diplomas and actively recruits the kids too.
Momma,

The army and marines will accept anyone who walks upright. During my 35 years as a Officer you always had to deal with the 18 year old seaman who tested out good on the ASVAB and was told by a recruiter that he could work as a aviation electronics tech etc. only to find out once he got into the training he washed out and ended up as a cooky in the Officers mess.

I would say that 90% of sailors on their first time out on a ship regret joining. That's where a good Officer steps in and helps the kid understand it ain't always going to be this way and offers him/her counsel. I have seen many a crying baby ending up on a whole different career path and being happy with it. There's even some Master Chiefs that cried on their first horrible cruise.
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:10 PM
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was told by a recruiter that he could work as a aviation electronics tech etc. only to find out once he got into the training he washed out and ended up as a cooky in the Officers mess.
One of my friends was working on a doctorate in education and had taught as a special ed teacher for a few years. She was 30-ish, and was told by a recruiter she could be a teacher on base for some of the enlisted people's kids. She already had 3 children, but wanted to join to get rid of all the student loans she had incurred studying.
Somehow, she was put overseas as a truck mechanic. She purposely became pregnant again to get out, and is working in the supt office in the public school system now.This all happened back when bush 1 was in office. And, as I said, it turned out ok for her because she was discharged for medical reasons, and now works heading a special ed school program for many ps schools in her district.
It is really sad how recruiters feed this to people, and it never happens the way people are told it will. I know she would never had joined at all if she had any idea she wouldn't be teaching on a base somewhere in the states where she could still have her family with her.
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:35 PM
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mtsc, not to confront you on this, but your story doesn't ring true.

Recruiters are VERY careful to NOT lie to people they recruit. In fact, enlistees are questioned and interviewed several times to make certain that they understand what tech schools they'll be going to and what their career paths will be. Military recruiters can be harshly disciplined for not being scrupulously truthful with the people they talk to.

And, the military does NOT put active duty teachers in classrooms for school kids, and no military recruiter would ever indicate that they would. Furthermore, pregnancy, in and of itself, is NOT a reason for a medical discharge.

I suspect your friend suddenly decided that she really didn't want to have to live up to her obligations, weaseled her way out of her commitment, and tells a baloney story to cover her own shame.
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Old 03-03-2011, 09:11 PM
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Default GED vs "Real" Diploma

I thought a GED just meant you were smart enough to test out of high school.

There have been some excellent responses to this thread. We graduated two and simply wrote out a diploma stating that they had completed the necessary curricula. One went on to become a teacher, one went into medicine.

I expect different states have different requirements but as has been mentioned, colleges are mainly interested in knowing whether or not a student can pay the tuition and complete the course work.

Our local county college even offers classes for graduates who can't read, write or figure so they're pretty happy to get a home-educated student since they usually do better anyway.

One of our youngsters took a wrong path and "dropped out." He had to test out of h.s. in order to get into the Army because I wouldn't forge a home school diploma for him. (by the way: personal experience is that recruiters take great liberties with what they call the truth. )
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:51 AM
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mtsc, not to confront you on this, but your story doesn't ring true.

Recruiters are VERY careful to NOT lie to people they recruit. In fact, enlistees are questioned and interviewed several times to make certain that they understand what tech schools they'll be going to and what their career paths will be. Military recruiters can be harshly disciplined for not being scrupulously truthful with the people they talk to.
All I know is what she told me. She has 4 children now, most younger than mine. She was having a really hard time with her student loans and decided to join the service to be a teacher there. She ended up a truck mechanic overseas somewhere and was crying a lot. She finally got out a few months later when she was pregnant. She works not too far from here now in the supt of schools office for special ed services. She was around 30 when this happened because her oldest son and my youngest son were friends back then. I'm sure she told me what happened to her in her view of the situation.
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Old 03-04-2011, 03:53 PM
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Recruiters DO NOT lie to the people they try to recruit. Nor do they take "great liberties" with the truth. It is all too easy for people to blame things on a recruiter when they suddenly find that they actually have to complete an academic and physical curriculum, and horror of all horrors, they are held responsible to do so.

People want to hear all about the benefit package, and think they can slip past the responsibility package. The military expects people to live up to their obligations, and if recruits decide that those obligations are too hard, the military will let them go into the civilian world where those attitudes belong.

If someone flunks out of their tech school, they end up where the needs of the service dictate. But that is the fault of the recruit, not the recruiter. To use Querty's example, if a person qualifies for aircraft avionics and doesn't bother, or is too lazy, to learn the job in the school, that person very well might end up with a badge and a gun guarding an empty stretch of fence. But the recruiter tells them what might happen long before the kid ever signs the enlistment papers.

mtsc, I know you are only repeating the story as it was told to you. I'm saying your friend isn't telling the truth, and that she isn't the caliber of human being needed by the honorable people that serve our country.
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