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  #1  
Old 04-27-2011, 10:27 AM
BWHLover Female BWHLover is offline
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Exclamation Sourdough Bread baking pans

Question to the people making homemade sourdough bread, are you using standard bread pans or are you using special sourdough bread pans or have you fashioned something homemade ?
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  #2  
Old 04-27-2011, 01:19 PM
fancy1 Female fancy1 is offline
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I just use my normal loaf pans, or a flat pan if I make a long shaped loaf.

I've not found a need yet to fashion my own pans, though you've got me thinking now...
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  #3  
Old 04-27-2011, 01:54 PM
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KarenBC Female KarenBC is offline
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Ordinary bread pans for me. I have a set of 4 that are connected together, industrial ones from a closed bakery. Heavy son-of-guns too!
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Old 04-27-2011, 02:33 PM
BWHLover Female BWHLover is offline
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I was thinking I could use my cast iron dutch over for round loaves but for long narrow loves I need ideas so the loaf keeps it's shape in the oven.
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Old 04-28-2011, 03:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BWHLover View Post
I was thinking I could use my cast iron dutch over for round loaves but for long narrow loves I need ideas so the loaf keeps it's shape in the oven.
Don't French bread pans look sort of like an 8 cut right down the middle and then laid on it's back? That are sort of like a uu but not very deep. I think the idea is to lay 2 long thin pieces of dough to make a baguette shape. One of those might work for your longer loaves.
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Old 05-13-2013, 03:37 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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I know that I am posting on an older question but here it goes. I use regular bread pans for my sourdough. I also use a "stone" for making round loaves, pizza crust and biscuits. If I want a long loaf I will use a cookie sheet. I have also braided my loaves and it turns out very pretty and it is something different.
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Old 05-13-2013, 04:38 PM
Teatime Female Teatime is offline
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Mountainmama, your braided loaves of bread sound so pretty! For my sourdough, I usually make baguettes that rise in a folded dishtowel. I have never made sourdough biscuits before, but think I had better try them. You seem so very experienced with sourdough and your heritage starter! We could learn a lot from you. Thank you for posting about it.
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Old 05-15-2013, 03:05 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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Thank you, Teatime! It has been through trial and error with my sourdough! I have given away starter to different people but they didn't take care of it. So I stopped giving it away. Most time people think that you only use sourdough for bread or pancakes, but I have also made cakes and cookies from it too. Not too bad if I say so myself. Perhaps I will post a recipe or two. Love to share!
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:54 AM
CLee CLee is offline
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We love a carmelized onion/chives biscuit recipe I have the uses 1 cup of unfed sour dough starter in the dough. Man those are good savory biscuits! Will have to dig around to find the recipe to post for y'all or you can find it over at King Arthur Flour.
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  #10  
Old 05-16-2013, 01:55 PM
Teatime Female Teatime is offline
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I would love to see some recipes from folks here. Like I said, I have never made sourdough biscuits, but want to try. Mountainmama, please include your braided loaf instructions. I make challah, but not sourdough.
Right now I am having trouble with my breads not rising enough without an addition of some yeast. This is a new starter, so will keep working on it.
Bring those recipes and examples on....would so appreciate them!
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Old 05-16-2013, 04:32 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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For my braided breads, I use the regular sourdough bread recipe:
1 c. starter
1 1/2 c. warm water
2 c. flour
1 tea. sugar (I use honey)
Mix and cover (Again in a non metal bowl and using a non metal spoon and measuring cup) Let sit in a warm place for about 8 to 12 hours. The warmer it is, the faster it will proof.
Add 3 cups flour
1 tea salt (I omit the salt)
Mix and knead until you have a nice dough that is not sticky. May need to add more flour. Let rise until doubled in a lightly greased or oiled bowl. Be sure to get the top greased or oiled.
Punch down and knead the bubbles out. Then you divide the dough in half, shape into loaves and put in greased loaf pans. Or form a round loaf, again greased pans or put on a stone with cornmeal sprinkled on it. (Always cut a slash in it that goes MAYBE 1/4 inch into the dough.) Let these rise until nearly doubled. If you want to make it into braids - divide one loaf into three equal sections. Roll them into long, round snake like strips. Pinch the beginning of the three strips together and braid like you normally would. It is best to do this on a greased cookie sheet. Pinch the ends together. Let rise until nearly doubled. Then brush the top with melted butter and bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until done. Then brush again with butter. That's all there is to it.
375 degree oven

If you want to make a nice pizza crust, here is the recipe.
1 cup starter
1 cup flour
2 tablespoons of oil (I use olive if I have it)
Mix all ingredients together. Sprinkle flour on the surface and a rolling pin. Roll dough the size that you want. Bake it for about 10 minutes then add your toppings. You may want to prick the dough with a fork before baking as it tends to puff up some. Bake your pizza for about 30 minutes or until done. 350 degree oven

Biscuits;
1 cup flour
1 cup starter
1/4 cup lard or shortening
1/2 tea baking soda
2 tea baking powder
1 tea salt
Mix the dry ingredients with the lard until it resembles a meal mixture. Mix in the starter. Sprinkle flour on a surface and either roll out the dough or press it out with your hands. Use a biscuit cutter or a glass dipped in flour or just cut the dough into squares or whatever shapes you want. Bake on a greased baking sheet or a stone sprinkled with cornmeal for about 12 to 15 minutes at 425 degree oven.
You could add grated cheese, a pinch of cayenne pepper to make cheese biscuits too.
Enjoy!

Last edited by mountainmama; 05-16-2013 at 04:36 PM. Reason: forgot something
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  #12  
Old 05-16-2013, 04:39 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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When you make sourdough bread, my recipes normally take about a day and a half. Just to let you know
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Old 05-17-2013, 12:04 PM
Teatime Female Teatime is offline
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Mountainmama, thank you so much for posting recipes! After reading your method, I can see where I was adding steps I did not need. I will give this a try starting today. I am anxious to make those biscuits.
And sourdough challah! Sounds so good. I brush my loaves with butter after they come out of the oven, and have never done it beforehand....now I will try that too. Thank you again!
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Old 05-17-2013, 03:37 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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Glad to help, Teatime. Now I have a question for you..........What is challah? Never heard of it. If you have any problems with the recipes, let me know.
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  #15  
Old 05-17-2013, 08:25 PM
Teatime Female Teatime is offline
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Challah is a eggy yeast bread that is braided and usually served on Shabbot...a Jewish Sabbath. I am not Jewish, but I do like the bread and have always made it. It can be braided in a three rope up to a six robe braid. It is baked on a cookie sheet and not in a pan. Now I will make sourdough challah.
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Old 05-18-2013, 02:51 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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Could I get the recipe from you? That sounds really good and I am always looking for new bread recipes.
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  #17  
Old 05-18-2013, 11:14 PM
Teatime Female Teatime is offline
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For Challah, I use Smitten Kitchen's recipe, but I use an extra egg. I first followed Chai Time's recipe, but she aims for low carb....I don't. I still use chai Time's braiding technique. Both links are included.

Smitten Kitchen's Challah:

http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/...lah-egg-bread/

1 1/2 packages active dry yeast (1 1/2 tablespoons or 3/8 ounces or 11 grams)
1 tablespoon (13 grams) plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) sugar
1/2 cup (118 ml) olive or vegetable oil, plus more for greasing the bowl
5 large eggs
1 tablespoon (14 grams) table salt
8 to 8 1/2 cups (1000 to 1063 grams) all-purpose flour
1/2 cup raisins (about 70 grams) per challah, if using, plumped in hot water and drained
Poppy or sesame seeds for sprinkling.

Chai Time's recipe and braiding technique...six strand braids are impressive.
http://chaitimeblog.wordpress.com/20...trand-challah/

Hope this helps. Baking bread is so very addictive! I love it.
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Old 05-19-2013, 04:13 PM
mountainmama Female mountainmama is offline
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Thanks for the recipe. Will try it soon.
I have made potato bread as well. Made some last week, but it didn't turn out too good. Will try again though.
Take care.
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:15 PM
Colorado Female Colorado is offline
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It sound good and it uses oil. I have to bake with oil now not shortening. I buy canola oil.
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  #20  
Old 09-14-2013, 06:23 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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I make my bread in round loaves most of the time. Fast and easy. sometimes I make it long, also fast and easy. My grandmother always made round sourdough loaves. Mine does not taste as good as hers. She used a lot of rye.
Thanks for posting the recipes. I never made sourdough biscuits.
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