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Old 05-17-2011, 10:08 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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Default 1950's yugo 8mm mauser ammo ? experience ?

I am buying a Remington 700 chambered in 8mm mauser. I have been looking for some ammo to shoot in it and came upon this



Curious if anyone has bought and shot any of this ammo ? I bought similar Yugo 7.62x39 ammo and reliability has been fine in my AR chambered in 7.62x39.

I am a little concerned about the fact that a civilian rifle may not be set up for hard military primers, but that is not always a problem.
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Old 05-17-2011, 10:47 PM
J R Adams J R Adams is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keitholivier View Post
I am buying a Remington 700 chambered in 8mm mauser. I have been looking for some ammo to shoot in it and came upon this



Curious if anyone has bought and shot any of this ammo ? I bought similar Yugo 7.62x39 ammo and reliability has been fine in my AR chambered in 7.62x39.

I am a little concerned about the fact that a civilian rifle may not be set up for hard military primers, but that is not always a problem.

Be Careful,
I bought some surplus ( 1950's era) Turkish 8mm Mauser ammo a few years back for use in a German WWII weapon. Twenty-five percent were duds. Wasn't the primers or the firing pin, just the ammo
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Old 05-17-2011, 11:38 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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I thought the Turkish ammo was 1940's vintage and was reported to be HOT ? I have not seen anyone selling Turkish surplus in my searches and have been satisfied with my Yugoslavian ammo so far. About 1 misfire out of 200 rounds so far.

I am curious about the headstamp on this ammo since my supposed 1950's 7.62x39 is stamped 1978... Maybe that is why it shoots so well. This stuff was made just 9 years before I served in Namibia / Angola so Swapo and the Cubans were probably shooting at us with this same stuff.....
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Old 05-17-2011, 11:42 PM
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I would ask about corrosiveness with any Soviet Bloc ammo.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:31 AM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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I expect it to be corrosive, just like anything I shot in the service. I clean my rifles every time I shoot them, appropriate for corrosive ammo. Cleaning the gun is therapeutic in my opinion....

at 20c per round, compared to close to $1, I would rather do some scrubbing of the bore and chamber and more disassembly to get to everything than spending 5x the note on the ammo. I would really not want to shoot 1/5th as often. For hunting, I would probably spring for commercial ammo and check the point of impact beforehand, or else the later sniper ammo at Wideners for $0.45/round since one doesn't need that many shots on a hunt. The other possibility is reloading, but even the bullet is over $0.45/round without primer and powder.

So as long as the surplus stuff is available and reasonably reliable it is a hell of a bargain. If the next Prez writes another executive order cutting us off from surplus ammo, someone is going to be paid to mutilate the stuff and sell if for scrap value. Just look at your tax $ at work on govliquidation.com .....
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Old 05-18-2011, 03:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keitholivier View Post
I clean my rifles every time I shoot them, appropriate for corrosive ammo. Cleaning the gun is therapeutic in my opinion....
Agreed!

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Old 05-18-2011, 11:37 AM
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Have seen a ton of both the older Turkish and Yugo ammo fired at a couple machine gun shoots I witnessed.

Biggest problem I saw with the Turkish ammo was split case necks. Brass was brittle and old enough a few necks would split and jam. Worked fine in bolt guns, but would push the bullet back in the case in self loading guns. It always fired with no problem, once chambered.

The Yugo ammo I saw fired, there never was a problem feeding, firing, ejecting in anything it was fed to.

Yes it seems like all military 8mm ammo loaded after they started using pointed bullets, is hot.

Only the older, round nose military ammo and commercial ammo seems loaded down to protect people who try to use it in turn of the century, (pre WW1) rifles. There are still many rifles like that out there, that are still useable.

I think the Remington 700, in 8mm was one of the "caliber of the year" rifles they put out. You should be able to go to web site, and get a number to check on that. I also suspect it is being sold, because it isn't a popular caliber. Now, if you are a re-loader, you should be able to buy it relatively cheap and have a lot of fun making it perform well.

When and where I grew up we had several 8mm rifles "recycled" by family members who were in Europe............. These rifles put a lot of deer, elk and other game meat across a dinner plate.

Good luck
Have fun
Keep safe
Wyo
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Old 05-18-2011, 03:30 PM
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I'm sure that y'all already know this, but just in case...

Most foreign manufacture military surplus ammo is Beridan primed, and not easily reloaded. Chances are that it will also have corrosive primers, meaning the barrel should be scrubbed with soap and water after using it and before using oil-based cleaning solvents.

Steel cased 'brass' (even if Boxer primed) is also difficult to reload because it cracks around the case neck when resized, and split cases are very common when fired the second time.

I hate to tell you what you already know, but maybe it will help someone who didn't know.
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Old 05-18-2011, 05:31 PM
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I've had good luck with Yugo ammo. Corrosive but accurate.

You can reload either cast of jacketed slugs; rechamber to 8MM-06 for cheaper brass, or just rebbl the rifle.
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Old 05-18-2011, 10:21 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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Wyo, the 8mm is making a bit of a comeback. The Remington was the only recent US made rifle and they seem to be fetching prices up to $800-900. There were not very many of them made (3000-5000 ?)

The one I obtained was new and unfired and had a muzzle brake fitted as well as conventional sights, so quite a bit of added expense on my example. On the other hand, the WW2 mauser rifles are still more reasonable although going up in price (over 300 in some cases and we are not talking collectors items).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
The Yugo ammo I saw fired, there never was a problem feeding, firing, ejecting in anything it was fed to.

I think the Remington 700, in 8mm was one of the "caliber of the year" rifles they put out. You should be able to go to web site, and get a number to check on that. I also suspect it is being sold, because it isn't a popular caliber. Now, if you are a re-loader, you should be able to buy it relatively cheap and have a lot of fun making it perform well.
Wyo
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Old 05-19-2011, 12:24 PM
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Why does everyone make such a fuss over "corrosive" ammo? If you clean the gun the same day you shoot the corrosive ammo, you won't have a problem. I've cleaned guns with soap and water, with solvent meant for muzzleloaders, and just plain old Hoppes #9 after shooting corrosive ammo and I've never had an issue. Its when a person shoots corrosive ammo then thinks he's gonna be able to clean the gun 3 weeks from now, is when the problems arise.

Clean the gun after you get home from shooting and you won't ever see a problem with corrosive ammo.
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Old 05-19-2011, 01:10 PM
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I use the water hose from the breech end, and flush the barrel that way for a couple of minutes. Then I dry and use milspec bore cleaner. Then oil well. The next two days, I just Hoppes #9 or some such and clean properly. I never get a spec of rust ina barrel doing this.

jim
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Old 05-19-2011, 03:17 PM
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Windex down the barrel from the breech after firing corrosives works fairly well also, at least it holds it till you can get the weapon home and cleaned.
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Old 05-19-2011, 08:10 PM
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That is a 700 Classic, and it was done only one run for one year and I would NOT put that ammo in mine, and yes I do have one.
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Old 05-19-2011, 10:06 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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I'm curious: Was not all ammo corrosive 25 years ago ? It seems to me that peoples expectations are to clean their rifle as often as they service their car. I don't fit that mold. I clean every time I shoot it. I shoot "decent" surplus ammo so I can stay in practice. The Yugo ammo is brass cased, copper jacketed lead core, so the only issue really is the primer.

The former owner of my rifle owned it for 7 years and never shot it. If you collect guns as a hobby, thats fine. I have too many other interests to have safes full of weapons that are "safe queens". It is a beautiful rifle and I don't think I am desecrating it by shooting the Yugo ammo.
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Old 05-20-2011, 12:57 AM
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Keith

We will need action pictures and a range report..........

ASAP...........

Enjoy
Wyo
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Old 05-20-2011, 02:03 AM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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I have visited every gun store I know of to get a 1 piece steel picatiny style scope base and no-one has them for the Rem 700 ??? Not even Cabelas. Warne makes at least 2 different ones, but apparently no-one buys them in a store. It looks like I will have to buy online and that means delivery next week. The yugo ammo is coming next week too. I found a box of 20 rounds to shoot with open sights and break in the barrel, $15+tax for 20... ouch... That available went all the way to $40/20rounds...

Longer term I am looking at a 3-12x42 Nikon Monarch, but short term I will use my 2-7x33 Redfield, for which I already have appropriate rings.

Why does no-one seem to stock nylon bore brushes for removing copper fouling ? I have to get those on line too. 10 for $12. I did get a brass jag, patches, windex and a bore mop (2x) and I have the usual general purpose clean/lube supplies. Maybe something will turn up tomorrow....
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Old 05-21-2011, 07:19 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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Default Pictures !

Thought I would post a few pictures from todays activity.

Attached a few pictures of the rifle with a temporarily fitted 2 piece steel Warne base and very nice Warne steel rings. Unfortunately, the scope tube is too short to fit keys in the rail, but it sufficed for initial trial and to get a feel how it works. A 7" long picatiny rail style one piece scope base is on the way from Brownels, just have to wait a few more days. I may have to cut a notch/relief in one side of the rail and re-blacken it to make it easier to load ammo into the magazine, but will wait until I have it and see how it works.

I removed the muzzle brake after getting back from the range, since I found that the inside of the bore was not effectively deburred after drilling all the holes. The brake tended to strip fluff off both bore patches and the bore mop that I used to clean the bore before shooting. I fitted the thread protector that was supplied with the brake and will shoot it this way next time and see how it works.

The magazine well is a bit long for the 8mm mauser bullets. When I was sighting in, I initially fed all rounds into the bore singly. When I thought I was about where I needed to be, I loaded 4 rounds in the mag and 1 in the chamber. Hold down the 4 rounds while cycling the bolt, no problem on the first round. When feeding the second round (from the mag), it seemed like the bolt couldn't pick up the rear of the cartridge and wouldn't feed. Perhaps I didn't pull the bolt all the way back, will check next time. But the rounds do have a lot of room to move around in the axial direction and I don't know if that is such a good thing ????

The statement that every Remington 700 comes with its own liability lawyer built in (the trigger) seems fitting. Trigger break was clean, and there wasn't a lot of take up, but boy it is heavy !!! I will do some more research on the subject of trigger adjustment, but this trigger is heavier than my DPMS AR which has a military style trigger.




Attached Images
File Type: jpg Scope & stock.jpg (12.6 KB, 39 views)
File Type: jpg Scope base and rings.jpg (13.9 KB, 39 views)
File Type: jpg Barrel marking.jpg (13.8 KB, 39 views)
File Type: jpg front sight.jpg (6.8 KB, 39 views)
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Old 05-21-2011, 07:38 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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Default Sighting in....

I was a little handicapped with sighting in, since I only had a total of 20 rounds. I bore sighted the scope by removing the bolt and aligning the bore with a reflector at about 30yds away on my loader backhoe. Then dialing the scope in to point at about the same target. That got me on paper at 25yds.

Attached are 2 pictures of sighting in targets.

The one of the smaller area is the target from 25yds. The first shot was to the right about 3" and then this target shows walking the POI to the center and then raising it about an inch high of the center. I thought this would suffice to get on paper at 100yds, but it nearly didn't work..

Next picture showing most of the target is the 100yd target. Those with sharp eyes will see how the first group of bullets just clipped the target at the very top edge just left of center. I don't have a spotting scope yet and really couldn't tell where the shots went. Then my shooting neighbor pulled out his spotting scope and had a look for me and said I was 6" high ???? WTF ??? So the balance of the target was walking the shots down to where I wanted them, about 1.5" high at 100yds. I don't know why the one rounds was so far to the left and on average most of the shots are a bit biased to the left, so I may have to correct.

I have to figure out in my mind why one would go from being just above center at 25yds to being 6" above center at 100yds, but the sight base must have the scope inclined relative to the bore. Sighting in my AR style rifle didn't have a similar behavior at all, even though it is the relatively slow 7.62x39. I was out of ammo for the 8mm pretty quick after working back down from being 6" high, so I changed over to my Minnesota made AK, the DPMS 7.62x39, which I had sighted in and debugged during my previous range trip.

Last edited by Westcliffe01; 02-14-2012 at 09:14 PM.
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Old 05-21-2011, 08:18 PM
Westcliffe01 Male Westcliffe01 is offline
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Default 7.62x39 DPMS @ 100yds

So here is what I got with my 7.62x39 DPMS with heavily re-worked C-Products magazines which I might add ABSOLUTELY DO NOT WORK as purchased. Investment of a couple of afternoons worth of troubleshooting and corrective action and the 2x 5 round mags work perfectly and the 30 round mags about as well as they ever will.

I try not to use the 30 round mags at the range, since they are too long to allow shooting from a bench rest. The 5 round mags were perfect and would be what I would use for hunting anyway.

I am using a 1-4x20 Nikon Monarch scope. It does not have much magnification for long range work, but at low magnification is better suited for close quarters shooting.

Other than the 1 flyer slightly low and to the right, all shots (2x 5 round groups) were inside the 3" circle. The trigger on this gun is pretty crap and I have to consider my options. It has a long take up and it gritty too and breaks at a really high force. Honing the sear may clear up the grittiness but I have to figure out what else I can do besides spend another $200 on a drop in trigger.

The ammo by the way, is Yugoslavian (corrosive primer) ammo which until recently was being sold at Wideners for $186/1120 round case. a couple of weeks ago there was a 50% price hike.... Very reliable and works well.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg dpms 1.jpg (12.8 KB, 38 views)
File Type: jpg mags and yugo.jpg (10.6 KB, 38 views)

Last edited by Westcliffe01; 02-14-2012 at 09:14 PM.
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