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Your Homestead Tell and show others with words and pictures how you built or are building your homestead and how you keep things going day-to-day. One thread per member, please.

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  #81  
Old 07-12-2012, 12:32 AM
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S2man S2man is offline
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Originally Posted by macgeoghagen View Post
All hens are missing feathers on their backs from Mr. Handsome's attention.
Sounds like Mr. Handsome needs to be educated with the .22, then introduced to batter and hot grease. I'll bet Lump courts the ladies instead of forcing his attentions on them. I vote for not passing on MH's genes.

I'm hoping to get a broody hen, so I won't need an incubator and brooder; Let her do all the work...
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  #82  
Old 07-23-2012, 01:41 AM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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Chickens have been re-homed. Lump lives with the adult hens. The black copper marans hens don't like my gamehen. They have been living together for over a week and they still chase her away and try to pull out her feathers. They all go to sleep in the chicken hutch, then start the fighting anew in the morning.

Mr. Handsome lives with a crowd of 8 juveniles. He is dutiful. He leads them in to sleep at night and alerts them to food. But he would rather be fighting with Lump. He tries to get out when I open the run to change their water.

The Breeding Program:
Both roosters have qualities that I like. Both have qualities that could be improved.

Lump: The good: Big, strong. For a medium sized breed chicken, he is huge. Not so good: He is a lot darker than the breed standard. Very short crow. Kinda standoffish.

Mr. Handsome: The good: very nice coloration. Fast maturing. Crows loud and long. Rather personable around me. Will take care of chicks and juveniles. Not so good: nothing really. he has no serious faults.

I hope that with Lump as grandfather and Mr. Handsome as father I will be able to get a rooster that is big, strong, friendly, colored well, and has a good crow.

The 8 juveniles are the offspring of lump and the adult hens. These and Mr. Handsome will eventually be another flock. I'm trying to breed copper speckles and neck in the hens. These speckles first show up when the hen grows her first juvenile feathers. They make for easy ID of a pullet. I have yet to see if the copper speckles correlate with darker egg color.

There are 7 chicks who are about 6 weeks old. 4 of these are black copper marans with copper speckles. I'll see if these grow to be hens or cocks. I suspect they will be hens.
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  #83  
Old 12-20-2012, 12:13 AM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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My younger flock has just started laying in the last week.

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  #84  
Old 12-20-2012, 01:43 AM
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Cool, I know just how ya feel. Great looking eggs. My youngest group just started yesterday 1 egg then & 1 egg today. lol 3 more to go lol
I have 11 other first year hens that I get 6 to 8 aday, Will have to start freezing them after the holidays.
sissy
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  #85  
Old 03-16-2013, 03:24 AM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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Nearly each night, and sometimes twice on weekend nights, I go hunting. I put on my jacket, get my flashlight, rifle, ID card, phone, sometimes my ugly falcata, and start stalking.

My quarry is the most dangerous animal on the planet: man.

Most people don't hunt other people. These hunters are usually police and military who do the unpleasant duty because of the few who DO enjoy hunting and hurting other people for fun and profit. These are the most dangerous subset of the species and must be guarded against and disposed of when found. The sheriff can't sit out here all night, and my neighbors are all in varying stages of old age, so it falls to me. Not because I am forced, but because I don't want violence done to any of my neighbors or their property.

The nights are quite comfortable this time of year, with clear dark skies above and gray haze on the horizons from nearby towns. The church across the road is illuminated by streetlights on both sides and a floodlight in front, casting the backs of the few clustered houses into shadow. I move in these shadows to avoid causing distress to any stranger motorist who may pass by. The neighbors and their dogs know I'm there. The dogs find me uninteresting. The basset next door doesn't even bother getting up any more. He just rolls over and goes back to sleep. The neighborhood cats are nearly the same way. Most are feral and avoid me when they can, but to most creatures I am just another part of the landscape. I nearly stepped on a possum who was hunting for crickets the other night. This prevents "false positives", I know that if the dogs are barking it's at somebody else, not me.
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  #86  
Old 09-09-2014, 10:22 PM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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The more I do, the less I have time for writing about. It has been a busy year and a half, with a lot of travel and a lot of work. Dun Macgeoghagen is still in the same location, but with much less brush, more land under chickens, and more pecan trees. The peaches didn't survive. The blackberries and blueberries did very well back in May and most of June.
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  #87  
Old 09-10-2014, 01:16 AM
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Glad to see you again--long time since you updated and caught us up.

Do you still guard the neighborhood?

What has been happening in Liberty?
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  #88  
Old 09-10-2014, 01:02 PM
m37 Male m37 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macgeoghagen View Post
Nearly each night, and sometimes twice on weekend nights, I go hunting. I put on my jacket, get my flashlight, rifle, ID card, phone, sometimes my ugly falcata, and start stalking.

My quarry is the most dangerous animal on the planet: man.

Most people don't hunt other people. These hunters are usually police and military who do the unpleasant duty because of the few who DO enjoy hunting and hurting other people for fun and profit. These are the most dangerous subset of the species and must be guarded against and disposed of when found. The sheriff can't sit out here all night, and my neighbors are all in varying stages of old age, so it falls to me. Not because I am forced, but because I don't want violence done to any of my neighbors or their property.

The nights are quite comfortable this time of year, with clear dark skies above and gray haze on the horizons from nearby towns. The church across the road is illuminated by streetlights on both sides and a floodlight in front, casting the backs of the few clustered houses into shadow. I move in these shadows to avoid causing distress to any stranger motorist who may pass by. The neighbors and their dogs know I'm there. The dogs find me uninteresting. The basset next door doesn't even bother getting up any more. He just rolls over and goes back to sleep. The neighborhood cats are nearly the same way. Most are feral and avoid me when they can, but to most creatures I am just another part of the landscape. I nearly stepped on a possum who was hunting for crickets the other night. This prevents "false positives", I know that if the dogs are barking it's at somebody else, not me.
sorry but reading your thread seems a little weird to me, what would you do if you did catch some one out late at night
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  #89  
Old 09-10-2014, 01:23 PM
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M37 check out his story on members fiction/Books.
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  #90  
Old 09-11-2014, 10:58 PM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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sorry but reading your thread seems a little weird to me, what would you do if you did catch some one out late at night
Make the person lay down, then get the sheriff involved.
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  #91  
Old 11-08-2014, 09:32 PM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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There are young blackberry canes all over the back field. I don't want to mow my future food, so my final mow before winter is mostly with the push mower. It is slow. The squirrels took advantage of my frequent work trips to throw down almost all of the pecans while they were still green. It is an off-year for my pecans anyway, so I ended up getting exactly zero pecans. I have been getting poor egg performance as well. Some of the older hens have stopped laying, but they won't let my younger hens eat. I have been waiting for a cold day after a couple of frosts so the flies will leave me alone while I'm processing.
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  #92  
Old 11-16-2014, 08:24 PM
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I processed 5 old hens and a cockerel. I know most of you like to pluck them and make them look like chickens from the store, but I don't. I pluck what I need to in order to keep the meat relatively feather free, skin and gut them. In the case of scrawny chicken, I go ahead and cut off the meaty parts while butchering them. It's a waste of freezer space to keep a whole chicken that is mostly bones.

More old hens are going to become food this weekend.

In other news, some of the tomato plants have survived the frost. I'm curious to see how long they survive the winter.
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  #93  
Old 05-25-2015, 03:54 PM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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Spring is a busy time, especially this particular spring. I have cut several hundred pounds of brush, either because it was getting overgrown or because it was in the way of food plants. I cut some holly bushes short to allow my blueberries more sunlight, and they responded by producing better. I have eaten 3 berries off the bush, and the main crop will be ripe in a few weeks. I have transplanted a few dozen blackberry bushes, among other plants. The general neglect of my land over the past year and a half has allowed various wild foods to grow. I also found some small passionflower vines and what I think is a fig tree. The garden is doing well. I will get my first crop of green beans today. The lettuce and spinach have been producing for a month.

As of this writing, another outbuilding is half dismantled. It was a roof set on poles, too tall to be useful for anything and too spindly for me to want to make it into something. It measured 12'x30' and 22' high, set on 8 4x4 posts. most of these were not continuous posts, but two posts spliced together with 1x4s. The structure itself will become a deathtrap soon, but right now the metal roofing and lumber are still useful for other projects.
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  #94  
Old 05-28-2015, 02:34 AM
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Perhaps the privet has some purpose that I am unaware of. Maybe it is fast-growing firewood.
I have never found privet useful for anything, myself. Neither have I ever found any large enough to really serve a firewood, but it might get that large if left alone. I despise privet and holly both. The holly berries look pretty, but apparent do not taste well, because wildlife doesn't eat them and I don't like the holly stickers personally.
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  #95  
Old 06-01-2015, 10:29 PM
macgeoghagen macgeoghagen is offline
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privet works as a hedge, but thats it. I have been pulling mine out whenever I get a spare moment to do that.
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