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  #21  
Old 05-29-2012, 09:50 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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bookwormom, would love for you to share your knowledge about your herbs. I love learning about this stuff. I feel that we could all benefit by knowing some of this stuff. I've been making a few tinctures, & salves and some teas with a few of the herbs. I ordered some bulk herbs from off line. they are better than what you get from the health food stores. I guess elderberry is my most used, and golden seal tea, burdock root, plantain. I've just started learning about comfrey root ( I got some comfrey root powder.) Would love to know your dosage for making stuff with it, and how you use it. I'm treating a wound on hubby's leg that he got Monday from the cement floor we poured. Looks like road rash. I used 1 tbs of comfrey root to 2 cups of distilled water, which I soak bandages in & lay on his leg. I'm hoping it will help heal it faster.
Well guess I'll quite rambling for now. Thanks for info you can share.

sissy

P.S. Would love to grow all my herbs some day. Have got some Plantain started in pots till I get a bed ready. When I can I will start getting plants to plant.
Plantain is a sign that soil is too compacted, The broad leaf can be used as tincture, salve or leaf. the narrow leaf in cough tea if the cough is deep and has phlegm with it. Chickry also grows on compacted soil. That is why you see it a lot beside the road. It has those blue flowers.

when I tincture something I fill the jar with the chopped up main ingredient, and then cover that with vodka, cheapest kind. I shake it every so often when I walk by and think of it. My comfrey tincture is dark, thick and slimy. Comfrey is a speedy healer and you have to make sure a wound is thoroughly clean, it might encourage skin to grow over something that should be out. I make tinctures preferably because it is fast, simple and usually the alcohol does not hurt anything. It may burn on occasion. Mother always made calendula salve and she used good lard, from a homegrown pig. the lard itself draws and is healing. she used it like Arnika. I would like to make St. Johnswort oil, but I can not get St. Johns wort to bloom in my garden. I kept a patch of the plants alive for a few years and they had a scraggly blossom here and there. Mother always had a bottle of that stuff. Rub it on something achy, nervous pains, a baby bawling, mother would gently massage it;s tummy with the oil and it would calm down. I still have a little that I made from collecting wild flowers with my Father and he died last year. so I look at the bottle and think of Dad. A week before he died he collected elder flowers and dried them for tea, I got a bag of it.
This year there is one volunteer chamomile plant in the garden.. I wonder where that came from. I am glad to share what we do and did. I think it is important to learn things of that nature. My paternal grandmother used whole leaves, rinse it off, dip it in hot water, slap it on. she had seven boys who got into a lot of scrapes. Her favorite and old standby for a lot of things was elder. And there is the saying that there is more than one way to skin a cat.
the only herbs I buy are swedish bitters. They contain stuff I do not grow or find wild.
There is a lot to find out about a subject like herbs. Lots of books out there. WE used sage for sore throat, but my experience is, H2O2 works better and faster. It was also used for excessive sweating, like someone's feet or underarms.
Just recently our friend cut his hand on a bandsaw and his wife put a burdock leaf on it and then a bandage over that. He was free from pain and it healed fast.
An interesting thread would be to ask the herbalists on here, what do you use for such and such a condition.
I have never used comfrey root powdered. But why not.
Herbs can be used also in cosmetics. And they work good too. I used to have really large pored skin, then for many years I made skin lotions and creams, I used some plants that I can not think the name of right now, one was witch hazel, one was a kind of hybiscus, althaea officinalis, that I bought in chopped up root pieces. It made a slimy infusion. anyway, after prolonged use, my pores became really small. Patience. and of that my grandmother said, patience is a bitter herb, but the fruit is sweet.
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  #22  
Old 05-30-2012, 04:19 PM
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sissy sissy is offline
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Thanks bookwormom, I love reading about your heritage. It is so cool.
Quote:
An interesting thread would be to ask the herbalists on here, what do you use for such and such a condition.
That would be cool.
Do ya think we could make it a sticky under medicinal plants/wild edibles
thanks
sissy
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  #23  
Old 07-23-2012, 01:34 AM
sage_morgan sage_morgan is offline
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I'm no professional, but I have had a few experiences with herbs. Since having a place to grow my own, it's been a lot easier. Those of you who have trouble growing or can't grow your own, I like mountainroseherbs dot com. But combine with someone else coz shipping is a tad costly if you only need one thing!

My first herbal cure was a four-day headache that I couldn't shake. In the stupor and reduced IQ of the darned thing, I finally realized my herbal books were all sitting there, and I should use them. So I made a huge list of 20-30 herbs that were known to be good for headaches. I had about zip zero nuttin, except I had marjoram in my spice drawer. Don't even know why, as I don't use it much. Anyway, I made a strong tea of 2 tablespoons of marjoram and a cup of water and let it steep 10 minutes. I swear as I was inhaling the scent, the headache was going away. Before I had that cup half down, the headache was gone. ... and I thought ... this is why they called knowledgeable old women witches. This is why!

I carried tea bags of marjoram with me for years.

Nowadays I have a big yard and lots of native plants grow here, many many weeds which are herbs, and a bunch of flowers and European herbs. I'm pretty good at IDing a lot of plants, despite growing up a city girl. This is how.

Years ago, living in the city, I decided to learn the plants in the landlord's lawn. There were 8 to 10. ... You can just pick any four around you to ID. Learn them. Learn to ID using the edges of the leaves, how the leaves are arranged, are they hairy or smooth? what color are they, the shape of the stem, how tall are they? Take a picture of it and drag yourself to a library. However it works for you, know those four. Learn where they came from, what they're good for, are they invasive species? can you safely eat them? how can you use them? You have to get the ID down pat before you can harvest them.

Once you are super sure about ID, then I do this: I google "arctium minus" for burdock and add the term "uses." Don't believe everything you read on the internet. Read books! Verify!

I love making tincture and salves and I harvest sometimes w/o knowing what I'll use things for. This year was really great for catnip until the drought got the better of it. I got quite a bit. Now it's too late to harvest.

Just before I came on here tonight, I started a yarrow-sage-comfrey olive oil tincture which will likely become a salve later on.

Yes, giving "advice" is a dodgy business. I can tell you what worked for me. What happens for you can be the difference in our herbs, a mistaken plant ID, or just your body reacting differently to my herbs than yours does to your herbs.

VERY interesting post! Good stuff posted! Thank you!
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  #24  
Old 07-25-2012, 09:24 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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Patience is a bitter herb, but the fruit is sweet.
Wow. I've never heard that before. Lovely . . and TRUE!
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  #25  
Old 11-22-2013, 12:56 PM
motdaugrnds motdaugrnds is offline
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Default great thread!

I'm thoroughly enjoying this thread. David has been studying herbology for some time now and the last few years has begun experimenting with what he finds growing wild here. I'll tell him about this thread!

Much of what has been mentioned I've found useful to varied degrees. So far, the only plant I've had a problem with was comfry. The comfry caused a rash on me; but I think I used it wrong as I only had a couple of layers of cheese cloth between it and my skin. I've also discovered much of what is sold in the stores as "supplements" were created from the less medicinal part of the plant. (It sure pays to have a working understanding even if one is not a practicing herbologist.)
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  #26  
Old 12-27-2013, 01:08 PM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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What a wonderful thread this is! I read 2-3 posts and started taking notes. When bookwormom writes her book, I shall be in line to buy it

Meanwhile...when making plant oils, is the plant fresh or dried when put in the oil? We have no trouble growing plantain. The broad leaf variety loves the driveway and the narrow leaf is all over the yard.

I have decided that this is the year to learn about the medicinal properties of all the stuff I've planted over the years. For example, apple mint. What can be done with that besides swear at it?
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  #27  
Old 12-27-2013, 05:04 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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I purchased some myrrh powder (a half pound - a lifetime supply!) Just a dab will dry up a cold sore or fever blister, and is good for babies that get thrush (yeast infection) in their mouth. But this stuff is SO dry and heavy! I'd like to try making a balm with coconut oil. Has anyone tried that?

In the same shipment, I got the first echinacea root I've ever purchased. It was also really dried up. The fresh stuff in vodka or 151 rum will make a strong tincture in 4-6 weeks, but this stuff has been soaking for months and doesn't seem to work as well. I can't wait to get out into the woods and get some fresh roots! (but considering how cold it is, I'm going to wait quite a while!!)
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  #28  
Old 12-27-2013, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by CarolAnn View Post
I purchased some myrrh powder (a half pound - a lifetime supply!) Just a dab will dry up a cold sore or fever blister, and is good for babies that get thrush (yeast infection) in their mouth. But this stuff is SO dry and heavy! I'd like to try making a balm with coconut oil. Has anyone tried that?

In the same shipment, I got the first echinacea root I've ever purchased. It was also really dried up. The fresh stuff in vodka or 151 rum will make a strong tincture in 4-6 weeks, but this stuff has been soaking for months and doesn't seem to work as well. I can't wait to get out into the woods and get some fresh roots! (but considering how cold it is, I'm going to wait quite a while!!)
I am a believer and user of coconut oil user--if this works let us know.
That would make a nice base for any medicine I think.

Where did you order your myrrh from?
Thanks Carol--btw its good to see you. :
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  #29  
Old 12-27-2013, 11:03 PM
StockdaleDave Male StockdaleDave is offline
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When I was growing up in rural North Carolina there were several old ladies that were descendants of slaves in the local area. They were always known as root doctors. They could make the best herbal/natural rubs, linaments, and poultices I ever ran into. Most have passed on now and I am really regretting not writing down the recipes. Most of their kids and grand kids have forgotten the old ways so I figure it isn't long for the earth anymore.
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  #30  
Old 12-07-2014, 09:17 PM
sage_morgan sage_morgan is offline
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Default Herbalists

It's tough to admit to being an herbalist because of so many factors in our modern world. But what you can do, is be educated about medicinal herbs in your own area and with your own health. Listen when the conversation comes up with old folks, and be open-minded and open-hearted.

A young guy (25-ish) who wouldn't say how he mashed up his ribs said that the doctors didn't wrap him up and they wouldn't prescribe anything for the pain. He asked if I had some comfrey. I told him I didn't have any experience with poulticing it on painful ribs, but I'd bring him some for that. He asked how to use it, and I told him to do some of his own research, and to pray about it and sleep on it, and do what felt right. I did take him about 10 leaves, most of my stash, and sent one link. He soaked the leaves til they were gooey (he did his own research since that wasn't at that particular link) and applied them where he could reach. He said he got relief in all but the areas he couldn't reach, which was the middle of his back.

Friends with anxiety and trouble sleeping, I'm sending dream pillows with different herbs in them for christmas. Let your heart be your guide. Be discreet. Be humble.
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