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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Canning/Preserving

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  #1  
Old 08-16-2011, 03:59 PM
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Cougarwalker79 Male Cougarwalker79 is offline
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Default Canning a small batch of pickled peppers.

After getting a late start on our (community) garden this year because the city took forever to till up the new site we moved to, we are finally starting to get some vegetables in. Earlier today I froze 2 lbs of Chard, and now I need to deal with the banana peppers.

The problem is, I only have about enough peppers to can maybe two half-pints. All of the recipes I have found involve canning pounds and pounds at a time of the peppers. I don't want to wait til more peppers come in, because the peppers I've picked will be losing quality all of that time.

So I was wondering if anyone has a small batch recipe for the peppers? I know that you basically just mix up a brine and then raw-pack the peppers, pouring the brine over them and processing. If I were to make a batch of the brine the size called for in the larger recipes, could I save that brine in the fridge or freezer until I needed to can another batch, or should I make as small of a batch of brine as possible?
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  #2  
Old 08-16-2011, 04:28 PM
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Grendal Male Grendal is offline
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Alrighty, so you got enough for 2 half pints...Let's look at my recipe. You can do this with any pickled pepper recipe.

General gren's sechuan pickled pepper (9 pints)

4 lbs. hot long red, green, or yellow peppers
3 lbs. sweet red and green peppers
5 c. vinegar 5%
1 c. water
4 tbsp. canning or pickling salt
2 tbsp. sugar
2 cloves garlic

If small peppers are left whole, slash 1 1/2 to 2 slits in each. Quarter large peppers. Blanch in boiling water and peel. Cool. Flatten small peppers. Fill jars leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Combine and heat other ingredients to boiling and simmer 10 minutes. Remove garlic. Pour hot pickling solution over peppers, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Adjust lids and process. Process in boiling water canner for 15 minutes for half pints or pints.

We know the recipe makes 9 pints, or 18 half pints. So we need to reduce it to 2....So we need to reduce it by .8...

That will give a recipe resulting in:

1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 cup rice wine vinegar (5%)
1 tablespoon + 1 3/4 teaspoons water
0.3 pound sweet peppers
0.5 pound hot peppers

Can keep the garlic as is...it helps add flavor. 1 clove of garlic in each half pint.

You'd then process it according to instructions. Something else I do is I add some spices and float some hot chili oil.

I use 2 types of spices.

5 spice powder

5 teaspoons ground anise (aniseed)
5 teaspoons star anise
2 tablespoons whole cloves
1 (5-inch) cinnamon stick
7 teaspoons fennel seeds

Process all ingredients in a blender container until finely ground.


Or my firehouse chili powder.

6 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons turmeric
1 tablespoon dried mild or hot chile peppers
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon Mexican oregano
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Mix all ingredients and grind to a fine powder using a mortar and pestle, or process in a food processor or blender.
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  #3  
Old 08-16-2011, 05:21 PM
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Mrs. Owens Female Mrs. Owens is offline
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I have stored and reused the brine or spice/vinegar mixture before and it turned out ok if I didn't wait too long in between. But I just used a mix from the store and not a bunch of spices with vinegar (which I will do now that I have been able to get the spices bought up that I need). Good Luck!
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Old 08-16-2011, 08:17 PM
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Well, I got my peppers canned.

I took the recipe for Pickled hot peppers from the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, and shrank it down to a more appropriate size. (and made one modification of my own).

The original recipe called for 6 cups of vinegar and 2 cups water and 3 garlic cloves for 6 pints of peppers.

I used:

2 C Vinegar
2/3 C Water
1 Garlic clove
1/4 tsp, turmeric

I brought this to a boil for 5 minutes, packed the raw pepper slices in the prepared canning jars, and poured the brine in to 1/2 inch. Processed for 10 minutes, then let sit for 5 in the hot water with the heat turned off. Removed them and set them on a towel to cool and dry.

I got exactly the two half-pints out of the peppers, so my estimation was dead-on. I could have made less brine, since I only ended up using about half of it, but I figured it would be better to have excess brine than not enough. The turmeric was added for color.

Now I'm sitting looking at them sitting on my counter (still hot), and I really want to sample them. I think I may open a jar of last year's dilly beans instead. I won't miss them, since I'm going to be harvesting green beans here in about another week or two...
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Old 08-16-2011, 09:51 PM
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Grendal Male Grendal is offline
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becareful if you do whole peppers rather then slices...you will need more brine as they tend to have air pockets in them...as the peppers slowly get soft and begin to sink, you'll find sometimes you got too much brine and the peppers tend to float. Happens if their also too loosely packed as well. Sliced works great through.
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Old 08-16-2011, 10:06 PM
Junie Female Junie is offline
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Cut a few slits in the peppers and they won't float up as badly.

I make my brine by mixing 3 parts vinegar to 1 part water then stir in 1 t. of plain salt and 1/4 t. alum for every 2 cups of brine. Bring it to a boil and pour over peppers in jars. I use hot jars and hot lids, turn the filled jars upside-down for 10 minutes, then turn them rightside-up to cool.

I know they say you're supposed to HWB them, but that makes them limp and I want them crisp (that's also why I add alum), so I just can them that way. I haven't had any go bad, even after 2 years. The whole point of pickling is to preserve food - it doesn't really even have to be canned (sealed), although I do make that concession.
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Old 08-16-2011, 10:08 PM
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I don't know that I'd ever be canning whole peppers, since the only thing I really use pickled peppers for is sandwiches, salads, and pizza. My grandmother canned the whole cherry peppers, but I'm not really a big fan of jarred hot peppers. I usually use hot peppers fresh or dried.
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Old 08-17-2011, 04:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cougarwalker79 View Post
I don't know that I'd ever be canning whole peppers, since the only thing I really use pickled peppers for is sandwiches, salads, and pizza. My grandmother canned the whole cherry peppers, but I'm not really a big fan of jarred hot peppers. I usually use hot peppers fresh or dried.
I use pickled sweet roasted peppers...they are small things about an inch...I add them whole to pizza and calzones.

I tend to drain them before cooking with them. The reason I use them is they add a kick to the mouth...bite into a meditteranean calzone they add a very nice kick.

The whole hot ones I take and slice them remove the seeds and stem. I then stuff them, cheeses, meats, and salads...

Meditteranean calzone

8 oz Boneless, skinless chicken breast
3 cups Baby spinach
2 cloves Garlic, diced
1/4 cup Whole wheat flour
1 16-oz Pkg whole wheat pizza dough
1/2 cup Low fat ricotta cheese
1/2 cup Onion, chopped
1/4 cup Roasted sweet pickled peppers
1 Small Roma tomato, seeded, cored & diced
1/2 cup Reduced-fat feta cheese
2 tsp Olive oil

Preheat oven to 375F. Bake chicken breast for 15-20 mins until fully cooked. Meanwhile steam spinach, garlic & 1 tsp water in a bowl for 2 mins on high in the microwave. When cool, drain excess liquid

Cover a flat surface and rolling pin with flour. Divide pizza dough into 4 sections by cutting with a knife. Roll out each section into a circle. Place each section on a baking sheet

Mix ricotta cheese & onion together with spinach-garlic mixture.

To assemble each calzone: Layer 1/4 of ricotta mixture, 1 artichoke heart, 1 tbsp red pepper & 2 oz chicken breast on 1 half of each dough section. Next sprinkle 1 tbsp tomato & 3 tbsp fets. Be sure to leave 1/4 inch around perimeter of dough. Fold in half to make a half-moon shape, pinch sides together with water to stick. Brush exterior of dough, on both sides, with oil, gently flipping over calzone to avoid contents ripping through. Bake for 20 to 25 mins, until dough is golden and feels crusty to the touch. Let cool for 5 mins


My other is the stuffed peppers...I do love other things stuffed in them too. My most sought after is escarole and sausage,sometimes I add some mozzerella string cheese.

1½ pounds escarole
3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 sweet Italian sausages, casing removed and meat crumbled
½ teaspoon peperoncino, or to taste
¼ teaspoon salt, or to taste

Trim off the tough bottom of the escarole head, separate and rinse the leaves, then chop them crosswise into 2-inch wide strips. Pour the olive oil into the skillet and set it over medium-high heat. Scatter the sliced garlic in the pan and cook for a minute or two until sizzling. Add the sausage, breaking up the meat and spreading it in the pan. Push aside the sausage and sprinkle the peperoncino in a cleared hot spot to toast it, then sprinkle the salt over. Stir together with the sausage and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until all the meat is browned.

With the heat on high, pile all the chopped escarole in the pan and toss the strips over and over, to heat and start cooking (tongs are useful for this). Pour a cup or so of water into the skillet and continue turning the escarole, as it steams and wilts, until all the water has evaporated. Lower the heat and cook, stirring frequently, until the escarole is very soft and almost dry, about 10 minutes in all. Adjust the seasoning and let the filling cool a bit. Turn it onto a board and chop it up with a chef's knife, so the escarole and sausage are in small bits and mixed together.

Once you got your peppers open just stuff, roll secure with toothpick and you can lightly bake if your working with cheese...so when they bite into it they good warm gooey cheese, escarole and sausage with this kick of pepper flavor a sour bite to it...least sometimes, depends on the pick recipe.
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  #9  
Old 08-18-2011, 11:12 PM
NCLee NCLee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cougarwalker79 View Post
So I was wondering if anyone has a small batch recipe for the peppers? I know that you basically just mix up a brine and then raw-pack the peppers, pouring the brine over them and processing. If I were to make a batch of the brine the size called for in the larger recipes, could I save that brine in the fridge or freezer until I needed to can another batch, or should I make as small of a batch of brine as possible?
Next time you have a small batch, mix up the brine recipe that you like, using the standard instructions. Fill as many jars as need with peppers, cover with the amount of brine needed. Then, put the excess brine in more jars to go in the canner. Can it, along with the jars pf peppers. Put the brine on your pantry shelf. You'll have it ready to use for your next small batch of peppers.

Lee
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  #10  
Old 08-20-2011, 04:43 AM
mountain man Male mountain man is offline
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When your next batch comes in try roasting them then canning them. I roast jalepenos by dumping a big batch on the grill on high and taking them off as they get chared. Cover the batch in a large bowl with plastic wrap and wait 10 min. Cut off tops, cut in half length wise and remove seeds and skin. Pack into jars and cover with brine of vinegar and water with some salt and can. Great on burgers, added to potato salad, chili, or any other dish you want a little heat.
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