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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Recipes

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  #1  
Old 09-14-2011, 06:21 PM
Hooverville Female Hooverville is offline
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Default Diet Bread????

So I bought a reprint of an old book at a yard sale. It's titled, "American Cookery, or the art of dressing viands, fish, poultry, and vegetables, and the best modes of making pastes, puffs, pies, tarts, puddings, custards, and preserves, and all kinds of cakes, from the imperial plumb to plain cake. Adapted to this country, and all grades of life. By Amelia Simmons An American orphan" - uh, yes that is exactly what the front cover says! So I'm looking through the section called "receipts" and I find this for diet bread: One pound sugar, 9 eggs, beat for an hour, add to 14 ounces flour, spoonful rose water, one do. cinnamon or coriander, bake quick.

Ok, what's one do. cinnamon? And I'm guessing it's diet bread because you have to beat for an hour?! Lol
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:37 PM
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So I bought a reprint of an old book at a yard sale. It's titled, "American Cookery, or the art of dressing viands, fish, poultry, and vegetables, and the best modes of making pastes, puffs, pies, tarts, puddings, custards, and preserves, and all kinds of cakes, from the imperial plumb to plain cake. Adapted to this country, and all grades of life. By Amelia Simmons An American orphan" - uh, yes that is exactly what the front cover says! So I'm looking through the section called "receipts" and I find this for diet bread: One pound sugar, 9 eggs, beat for an hour, add to 14 ounces flour, spoonful rose water, one do. cinnamon or coriander, bake quick.

Ok, what's one do. cinnamon? And I'm guessing it's diet bread because you have to beat for an hour?! Lol

Back then, sugar was not considered to be unhealthy...rose water, cinnamon or coriander were also prized as medicine.

Infact Crusade chronicler William of Tyre wrote in the late 12th century, described sugar as "very necessary for the use and health of mankind".

Sugar was once called White gold.

Before a meal, the stomach would preferably be "opened" with an Aperitif (from Latin aperire, "to open") that was preferably of a hot and dry nature: Sweets made from sugar- or honey-coated spices like ginger, caraway and seeds of anise, fennel or cumin, wine and sweetened fortified milk drinks. As the stomach had been opened, it should then be "closed" at the end of the meal with the help of a digestive, most commonly a dragée, which during the Middle Ages consisted of lumps of spiced sugar, or hypocras, a wine flavored with fragrant spices, along with aged cheese. A meal would ideally begin with easily digestible fruit, such as apples. It would then be followed by vegetables such as lettuce, cabbage, purslane, herbs, moist fruits, light meats, like chicken or goat kid, with potages and broths. After that came the "heavy" meats, such as pork and beef, as well as vegetables and nuts, including pears and chestnuts, both considered difficult to digest. It was popular, and recommended by medical expertise, to finish the meal with aged cheese and various digestives.

They even used sugar and honey as preservatives.

Sugar, traditionally sugar cane was used to treat everything, from treating skin and urinary tract infections, as well as for bronchitis, heart conditions, loss of milk production, cough, anaemia, constipation as well as general debility. Some texts advise its use for jaundice and low blood pressure.

A common folk remedy was to mix fresh stem juice with dry ginger in order to relieve hiccups . A plaster made from equal parts of sugar and yellow soap is used externally for treating boils, while crude sugar is applied to carbuncles.

As far back as Ancient Rome sugar was recorded as a medicine. Pliny had recorded sugar as a medicine, Buddha had called it a medicine, and the prophet Mohammed had recommended sugars and syrups for the sick. Thomas Aquinas took the view that those who resorted to sugar during Lent did so for health reasons, not for nourishment, and in 1353, a French royal decree required apothecaries to swear never to use honey when sugar was prescribed.

All things change. By 1581, Abraham Ortelius, a Flemish cartographer, would comment that ‘what used to be kept by apothecaries for sick people only is now commonly devoured out of gluttony’.
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:45 PM
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The cardamom was one of the most valued spices of the ancient world and it was one of the principal items of trade. The ancient Greeks around the 4th century B.C highly valued the cardamom as a culinary spice and as a base for herbal medicines. Trade in cardamom was an important part of the trade links between the India and the Mediterranean region.
In the ancient world, remedies made from the cardamom were used to bring relief from digestive problems, the historical uses of the cardamom in this respect include its use particularly in the treatment of problems such as indigestion, excess abdominal gas, and to bring relief from muscular cramps. Many other herbal digestive remedies were flavored using the cardamom, as the herb possesses a very pleasant taste and aroma, the delicate and nice flavor aids in suppressing the bad taste of less palatable but effective herbal remedies. In the ancient world, it was an additive to many medications.
The Indians have used the cardamom in herbal medications since ancient times for treating various conditions, these problems include disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, problems like kidney stones, disorders such as anorexia, debility, and a weakened vata. Indians also use the cardamom extensively as a spice; it is used as a flavoring in many delicious Indian foods. The ancient medical system of China also included the cardamom in its herbal repertoire, in traditional Chinese medicine, the cardamom is used in the treatment of urinary incontinence and as a general herbal tonic.
One very effective use of the cardamom is its effective alleviation of bad breath. Cardamom also helps to mask the flavor of herbs such as the garlic, helping to suppress the pungent and strong aroma of the garlic. One long standing reputation of the cardamom herb is its aphrodisiac effect.


Where as cinnamon is desired for other effects.

The anti-viral and stimulating properties of the volatile cinnamon oil is the prime reason for the medicinal value of the herb and the oil is the single most important product from the plant as far as its use in herbal medicine is concerned.
The herbal remedies made from the cinnamon can help in relieving cramps, they can help in alleviating colic, and they also act as an herbal relaxant, helping reduce the general anxiety and stress in affected patients. The volatile oil of the cinnamon contains a chemical called eugenol which can aid in relieving painin the body, particularly in such instances as when it is used as a liniment during the treatment of arthritis, this chemical is also helpful in reducing the pain of a toothache as it deadens the nerve ending. At the same time, the remedial properties of the plant come into full effectiveness against disorders such as persistent headaches, against muscle pain and neuralgia in the body.
The herbal remedies based on the cinnamon plant are also useful stimulants of the digestive system and have a warming effect on the body, they are also very useful in cases of weakened digestion in the digestive system, the remedies are also useful against colic, in the treatment of griping pains, in the treatment of disorders such as diarrhea, and in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, as well as in alleviating excess wind and distension in the abdominal region. Other chemicals in the plant also come into play and give the herbal remedy many unique properties, for example, an astringent action is ascribed to the tannins, this property of the herb is also successful in stemming the bleeding during heavy nosebleeds, it can be used to stanch heavy periods and aids in resolving diarrhea and problems such as catarrhal congestion in different patients. Excess perspiration can also be stopped if the cinnamon is taken as a cold herbal remedy.
Cinnamon was traditionally used as a herbal warming agent, in the herbal medicine of both India and Europe, the herb was a treatment for "cold" conditions and was believed to induce warmth in the patient, cinnamon remedies were traditionally also taken combined with some ginger - spp. Zingiber officinale to induce the warmth in the body. Circulation in the body is stimulated by the herb, and the remedy is particularly relevant to the circulation in the fingers and toes - when such extremities of the body become to cold. Traditional healers also made extensive use of the herbal cinnamon based remedies as a treatment for all sorts of digestive problems, specifically in the treatment of nausea, to treat cases of vomiting and diarrhea, it was also used in the treatment of various aches, to treat cramped muscles and in the treatment of other symptoms ascribed to viral infections such as the common cold and flu.
Cinnamon is also used extensively and as a specific herbal remedy in patients with debilitations, it is also a major herbal remedy during the convalescence process from physical and mental injuries.
Menstrual bleeding is also encouraged by the herb and it is believed to posses a slight emmenagogic ability - thus capable of aiding in the active stimulation of the uterus in women affected by menstrual problems. The contraceptive action of the cinnamon is made use of in India, and the herb is usually taken by women following childbirth in this role as a guard against early pregnancy.


These were known back then for their medicinal usage. So back then it was considered healthy.

PS. The english were known for tooth decay and their sweet meats in the midevil times.


Edit...cinnamon is also used to treat altitude sickness, and tennis elbow...I read somewhere hannible used cinnamon to make it through the mountain pass.
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Old 09-15-2011, 05:19 AM
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The little booklet shows the original date as 1796, and what I have has a photocopy of the original pages (which includes the old lettering such as "s" looks almost like "f") and then modern copy of the whole thing that makes it easier to read. I thought it was cool. Grendal, you're info helps me to understand a lot of the unusual recipes I've found in it. Thanks!
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Hooverville View Post
The little booklet shows the original date as 1796, and what I have has a photocopy of the original pages (which includes the old lettering such as "s" looks almost like "f") and then modern copy of the whole thing that makes it easier to read. I thought it was cool. Grendal, you're info helps me to understand a lot of the unusual recipes I've found in it. Thanks!
Your welcome. 1796 is almost no differen the middle ages lol, the medicine back then was very crude.

Example of how crude below (replaced old english for modern english), crude, but effective.

"Dr Mootfie of Bath has used with the greatest success the aqua kali puri olim lixivium saponarium in the case of a woman who had been bitten by a viper and who was apparently in a dying condition A tea spoonful was at first administered in water every three or four hours and afterwards every fix hours she was relieved immediately after the first dose and in four days was perfectly restored to health The doctor further observes that when persons are bitten by animals whose venom is highly deleterious the progress of the disorder may be stopped and the person saved by the speedy administration of the lixivium saponarium Hence also if any of the strong mineral acids should fall on any part of the body the immediate application of this substance will prevent them from doing any further mischief Or if a person should accidentally swallow any of the mineral acids or hydrargyrus muriatus or any other corroding salt which an alkali will decompose a speedy exhibition of a solution of the alkaline salts in proper doses affords the most likely means of relief and of preventing fatal effects."

aqua kali puri (water of potash) olim lixivium saponarium (another name for it)

AQUA KALI Puri, Water of pure Kali Take of prepared Kali four pounds Quick lime six pounds Distilled Water four gallons Put four pints of water to the lime and let them stand together for an hour after which add the Kali and the rest of the water then boil for a quarter of an hour suffer the liquor to cool and strain A pint of this liquor ought to weigh sixteen ounces If the liquor effervesces with any acid add more lime Then boil the liquor and the lime together for five minutes in a close vessel Lastly let it be again cooled and strained.This was formerly called Lixivium saponarium The boiling should be performed in an earthen or glass vessel and the straining be through linen.

Prepared Kali
Take of Pot ash two pounds Boiling distilled Water three pints Dissolve and nitre through paper evaporate this solution until a pellicle appears upon surface then set it aside for twelve hours the neutral salts may crystallize afterwards pour out the liquor and boil away the of the water constantly stirring lest Salt should adhere to the pot In like manner is purified impure Kali from ashes of any kind of vegetable The same Salt may be prepared from tartar, burnt until it becomes ash coloured.

Pure Kali Take of Water of pure Kali one gallon Evaporate to dryness then let the Salt be melted upon the fire and poured out REMARK This preparation formerly called Alcali vegetable fixum Caufticum and Lapis Jefticus is described in the Ed Disp 1783 more particularly viz to evaporate the Lixivium in a very clean iron vessel upon a gentle fire until on the ebullition ceasing the saline matter gently flows like oil which happens before the vessel becomes red Pour out the caustic thus liquefied upon a smooth iron plate lef it be divided into small pieces before it hardens and these are to be put into phials close stopt It is is a very powerful caustic but too apt to liquefy upon the part to which it is applied and to spread beyond the limits within which it is intended to operate.


I highly recommend visiting medical museums.

I'd recommend Museum of Questionable Medical Devices and the Mütter Museum in philidelphia. Just hope you have a strong stomach, some of the medical stuff can be very digusting.
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Old 09-15-2011, 04:12 PM
Hooverville Female Hooverville is offline
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When I was younger I could handle the yucky stuff - but not these days! Lol I don't remember exactly when things changed, but I get way too queasy now!
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:51 AM
annabella1 annabella1 is offline
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Diets aren't always for losing weight This might be a diet for gaining weight. Actually anything you eat is your diet.
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