BHM Forum      
Subscribe to Backwoods Home Magazine print or Kindle editions
Office Hours Momday - Friday  8 am - 5 pm Pacific 1-800-835-2418

Facebook   YouTube   Twitter
Follow Us!



 
Backwoods Home Magazine, self-reliance, homesteading, off-grid

Features
 Home Page
 Current Issue
 Article Index
 Author Index
 Previous Issues
 Newsletter
 Letters
 Humor
 Free Stuff
 Recipes
 Print Classifieds

General Store
 Ordering Info
 Subscriptions
 Kindle Subscriptions
 ePublications
 Anthologies
 Books
 Back Issues
 Help Yourself
 All Specials
 Classified Ad

Advertise
 Web Site Ads
 Magazine Ads

BHM Blogs
 Ask Jackie Clay
 Massad Ayoob
 Claire Wolfe
 James Kash
 Where We Live
 Behind The Scenes
 Dave on Twitter
Retired Blogs
 Oliver Del Signore
 David Lee
 Energy Questions
 Bramblestitches

Quick Links
 Home Energy Info
 Jackie Clay
 Ask Jackie Online
 Dave Duffy
 Massad Ayoob
 John Silveira
 Claire Wolfe

Forum / Chat
 Forum/Chat Info
 Enter Forum
 Lost Password

More Features
 Meet The Staff
 Contact Us/
 Change of Address
 Write For BHM
 Privacy Policy

Retired Features
 Country Moments
 Feedback
 Links
 Radio Show





  
 

BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser.

   

Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Plants > Farm/ Garden/Flowers/ Shrubs/ Trees

Farm/ Garden/Flowers/ Shrubs/ Trees If it grows in the soil, this is the forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-19-2011, 09:14 PM
ExHic Male ExHic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Western Missouri (for the time being)
Posts: 23
Default Growing Blackberries in Zone 3 or 4

Although I have not started yet, I plan on starting my homestead sometime next near. Where I live now is Zone 5b or 6 based on the map you look at. However, based on some plans that may take place, I may be moving to an area which is considered Zone 3 or 4.

I want to grow Blueberries, Currants, Raspberries, and Blackberries. Since the are bush type plants, I plan on creating a frames to keep the birds out. The thing is that many of these fruits will not grow (or have trouble growing) in Zones 3 and 4.

One idea I had was somehow sealing up the frames in the winter, but allow for them to be open when the weather is not cold, but closing them up when extreme cold weather (lows below zone 5 minimum) is predicted.

Has anyone had experience doing this and what would you suggest. Also, what would you suggest for temperature mitigation for those really cold temperatures.

BTW: I do have some engineering experience within the Architectural area so you can be as technical as you need be.

Last edited by ExHic; 09-19-2011 at 09:23 PM.
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old 09-20-2011, 01:00 AM
KarenBC's Avatar
KarenBC Female KarenBC is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Prince George, B.C., Canada
Posts: 1,311
Default

ExHic - there are a lot of varieties that are very suitable for Zone 3-4.

I grow raspberries, currants and gooseberries with no problem at all and I'm in zone 3, shading towards zone 2. This year I put in a blackberry that is meant for the north , so we'll see how that does. I've also got a blueberry shrub that I haven't planted yet.
Oh, I've got grapes in too!

I don't use ANY winter protection for most of these plants. The snow seems to provide all the insulation they need. The grapes I'll be protecting with a mulch.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-01-2011, 12:09 PM
ExHic Male ExHic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Western Missouri (for the time being)
Posts: 23
Default

Decided to stick with Raspberries. Have realized they taste better than blackberries..
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-02-2011, 10:16 PM
kfander Male kfander is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Millinocket & St. Agatha, Maine
Posts: 1,947
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ExHic View Post
I want to grow Blueberries, Currants, Raspberries, and Blackberries. Since the are bush type plants, I plan on creating a frames to keep the birds out. The thing is that many of these fruits will not grow (or have trouble growing) in Zones 3 and 4.
There's nothing wrong with any of those, and they should grow in those zones. Have you considered adding lingonberries to the mix? You couldn't hope for a more trouble free berry. The worst thing you can do is try to help them. They love being ignored, and hate being watered, fertilized or otherwise pampered. A little peat moss (or equivalent) before the snow comes is nice and, until they get established, it's good to weed around them some, but otherwise just leave them be.

I planted four different varieties along my driveway in Millinocket, Maine. One died, but that's only because my cat dug it up and I didn't notice before it was too late. I put a mesh down to keep my cat from using it as a litter box, and they're doing great. I was away from Millinocket for the spring and summer, and found several new plants when I returned. Millinocket is in Zone 4 but lingonberries will grow even in Zone 2.

Prepare the soil before planting, as they don't like rich soil, preferring peat moss to compost. And if you plant a few different varieties, not only will they all do better but you'll have crops coming at different times in the spring, summer and fall.

I have had poor luck with blackberries and raspberries for some reason. Although they grow wild here, ones that I've planted generally don't survive a winter.
__________________
That's my opinion and I'm sticking with it unless someone yells at me or something.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -2. The time now is 03:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.