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  #1  
Old 12-19-2011, 12:26 PM
yardburd yardburd is offline
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Default Should wax be used for rust-proofing?

Living here in sunny, humid Flo0rida, I find it nearly impossible to my firearms rust-free. It has occurred to me that a paste wax might do a better job of protecting from moisture than does oil or grease. Has anyone tried this? Varnish does a great job of protecting tools but I don't want to use it on my guns.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:32 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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Read about a gun writer testing various concoctions on degreased razor blades. He left them out side in the weather for a month and then evaluated the performance of each rust preventive treatment. I suppose you can do the same.

I'm not sure that running a paste-wax covered patch down your bore would be a good idea. I suppose it would give good rust protection, but if any globs of it dry out inside the bore they could become a dangerous obstruction.

What might work better is to dissolve some paste-wax in mineral spirits (say 10-20% wax) and wipe the guns inside and out with that. As the spirits evaporate, they'll leave a very thin film of wax on the metal. That might not lead to a dangerous obstruction.

Personally, I've been using Ed's Red for about 15 years now with excellent results. It's a blend of 25% kerosene, 25% mineral spirits, 25% automatic transmission fluid, and 25% acetone. To mine I add 50 grams per liter of anhydrous lanolin. The lanolin likely is serving the same function that the wax would serve in your application. Here's a reference to making/using Ed's Red.
http://www.handloads.com/articles/default.asp?id=9

In any case I'd suggest you do your own razor blade testing before you make any switch. Then you'll have the answer right in front of you.
Good luck,
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  #3  
Old 12-19-2011, 02:23 PM
Grouchy-Hermit Male Grouchy-Hermit is offline
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Are these firearms that need to be at arm's length or are they stored? If stored, I would consider a specially made storage bag with a dose of desiccant.
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  #4  
Old 12-19-2011, 03:22 PM
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backlash Male backlash is offline
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I put all my firearms in gun socks.
No rust anywhere.
As for paste wax I think it would work just fine.
I use wax on my table saw table and it keeps it rust free.
http://www.cabelas.com/sleeves-camo-...6-001b2166c2c0
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2011, 11:20 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Default protectant CRC power lube

I use CRC power lube on all my firearms. I have in the past used auto paste wax on the outside during heavy rains while hunting.

http://www.oki-bering.com/PDFs/CRC/PowerLube.pdf

I worked with aircraft in the Navy and attended their corrosion schools. Years later working in a power plant I've used every wiz ban concocion around. If I could get the old CPC corrosion preventive compounds the Navy had I'd use them in a heart beat.



Dextron
INCOMPATIBILITY WITH OTHER MATERIALS: * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
May react with strong oxidizing agents, such as chlorates, nitrates, * * * * *
peroxides, etc.

* * * * * ** * * *
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Old 12-19-2011, 11:26 PM
HuntingHawk HuntingHawk is offline
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If I recall correctly, CPC was milspec WD40.
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Old 12-19-2011, 11:30 PM
HuntingHawk HuntingHawk is offline
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Other then firearms for immediate home defense, I clean the guns & wrap with cling wrap.

Ross
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:54 PM
mtdrtbag Male mtdrtbag is offline
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CPC is the acronym for corrosion protective compound and it comes in numerous grades for different applications. A product that I use is called Corrosion X it can also be found under the name ACF-50. It is used in aviation as a corrosion remover and preventitive and often sprayed inside the wings of airplanes operated in salt air laden enviroments to prevent aluminum oxidation/corrosion . I work in aviaiton and get it from our parts room. Nearly any aircraft maintenance shop should have it. I did see it for sale in shotgun news a while back. This is the best I have found. I use it on all of my firearms and have excellent results. Sprayed on and wiped off it leaves no heavy greasy film and leaves a protective film that literaly lasts for years.
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Old 01-23-2012, 07:18 PM
Poonie Male Poonie is offline
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Never, ever store a gun in any kind of gun case, gun sock or similar. Even using dessicant, the cloth of the case will absorb moisture. Dessicant in this situation will not get all the moisture out. Best to store in a gun cabinet and then add dessicant or one of those electric golden rods....A home with central air also will help to prevent rust by removing most of the humidity from the air. Keep the gun well oiled as well. Car wax will not work. You'll never get it into all the nooks and crannies as you can with oil. If stored for long periods, check the guns and add a fresh oiling every so often.
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Old 01-23-2012, 08:46 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Default cpc good stuff

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtdrtbag View Post
CPC is the acronym for corrosion protective compound and it comes in numerous grades for different applications. A product that I use is called Corrosion X it can also be found under the name ACF-50. It is used in aviation as a corrosion remover and preventitive and often sprayed inside the wings of airplanes operated in salt air laden enviroments to prevent aluminum oxidation/corrosion . I work in aviaiton and get it from our parts room. Nearly any aircraft maintenance shop should have it. I did see it for sale in shotgun news a while back. This is the best I have found. I use it on all of my firearms and have excellent results. Sprayed on and wiped off it leaves no heavy greasy film and leaves a protective film that literaly lasts for years.
I still have about 3oz of cpc grad 4 left from my Navy days. That is some 30 years ago. I use to take the grade 1 spray and use it on my truck and car. Bolts,straps nothing tarnished much less rusted.
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Old 01-23-2012, 08:49 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HuntingHawk View Post
If I recall correctly, CPC was milspec WD40.
WD40 is a water displacement compound. It's good to blow moisture out of tight spots.
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Old 01-24-2012, 02:21 PM
Poonie Male Poonie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackpowderbill View Post
WD40 is a water displacement compound. It's good to blow moisture out of tight spots.
Break Free will do the same.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:02 PM
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Stinger Male Stinger is offline
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A Carnauba based car wax will work extremely well for protecting the exterior finish on any firearm. This wax has, in fact, often been recommend to me by various (large and knowledgeable) gun collectors, as well as one Smith & Wesson factory representative with whom I've dealt over the past 35 years - This exterior metal preservation method works!

Don't use WD40 on firearms, especially on any firearm that's placed in longterm storage for more than a year. (Or, it will start to gum up, cause pitting in the metal, and you'll be sorry!)
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  #14  
Old 02-13-2012, 03:55 PM
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backlash Male backlash is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poonie View Post
Never, ever store a gun in any kind of gun case, gun sock or similar. Even using dessicant, the cloth of the case will absorb moisture. Dessicant in this situation will not get all the moisture out. Best to store in a gun cabinet and then add dessicant or one of those electric golden rods....A home with central air also will help to prevent rust by removing most of the humidity from the air. Keep the gun well oiled as well. Car wax will not work. You'll never get it into all the nooks and crannies as you can with oil. If stored for long periods, check the guns and add a fresh oiling every so often.

Silicone-treated, polyester/acrylic gun socks give valuable firearms protection against rust, dirt and scratches. The fabric won't hold moisture, making these gun socks ideal for year-round storage.
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  #15  
Old 02-21-2012, 05:43 PM
JeffColorado JeffColorado is offline
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I actually use wax on my shotguns here in the northwest and have no issues at all. The one I use - Renaissance, is used by several museums including the Smithsonian firearms section and the Army firearms museum. Here’s a link to Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Renaissance-Mi...ews/B001DSZWEM
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  #16  
Old 02-21-2012, 10:50 PM
Job Male Job is offline
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For your firearms, use PB Blaster. You will not be disappointed. Has an agent in it that stops rust and prevents it from spreading if it is already present. I have used it for about three years now and it will 'not' hurt/harm your firearms. And as for duck hunters, it does not get thick in cold weather and interfere with the action. (lubricate generously and whip clean, very user friendly.)


For your field knife, use Linseed oil. If you use your knife for processing game, use Linseed oil, it is not toxic. (thin coat works best)

Job
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  #17  
Old 12-14-2013, 04:36 PM
pipehand pipehand is offline
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Default Gun Wax

Nu-Finish "once a year" car polish (in the orange bottle) works well on my blued guns to prevent rust.
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  #18  
Old 12-15-2013, 05:20 PM
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Only after you have thoroughly removed all water and chances of it. You don't want to trap water UNDER the wax preventative.
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  #19  
Old 08-17-2014, 10:10 PM
Hummer Male Hummer is offline
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Dittos for Ed's Red, I did a test a few years back and sloppy wet lubed a 1903A3 Springfield barrel and stored it muzzle down for 14 months. Went back and ran a borescope down the barrel and it was still wet and clearly working.

I submerge locks in it I am going to leave outside exposed to the weather.

RIG is also very good, short for Rust Inhibiting Grease, came out in time for WW2 and my Dad said it was used heavily in South Pacific.

BreakFree is good for external corrosion protection though I do not use it internally in anything.
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  #20  
Old 08-18-2014, 12:07 PM
papa bear papa bear is offline
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if in FL, buy stainless steel guns
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