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Old 03-17-2012, 09:25 PM
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God's Country Male God's Country is offline
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Default My Garlic is sprouting...Help!

With this insane weather we’re having my garlic is sprouting….at least 6 weeks early.
I live in the northern mts of Pa. We usually can’t even plant until the first week of June, except for hardy crops. I know garlic is fairly hardy, but I know we’re going to get snow and numerous hard frosts between now and late April. I spent a lot of money last year on heirloom garlic. Is it going to make it? I mulched it heavily with old hay in late fall.
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:16 PM
tomato204 Male tomato204 is offline
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Default garlic

If it's mulched it should be fine, can stand a good bit of frost.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:02 AM
JarDude Male JarDude is offline
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Why do you figure it's 6 weeks early? You are a half zone or more warmer than me and if mine wasn't peaking until may 1 I'd be one worried gardener.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:07 AM
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I leave mine in over winter in extreme cold and expect it to be up sometime in April.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:35 AM
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With some mulch it should do just fine.
"Hardiness Zones" are just that, they're used to define area climate in relation to the survivability of perennials. They're of little use otherwise.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JarDude View Post
Why do you figure it's 6 weeks early? You are a half zone or more warmer than me and if mine wasn't peaking until may 1 I'd be one worried gardener.
I've only done garlic a couple times and it was the end of April before it sprouted. I live at some elevation. It's always quite colder in my area than the surrounding area. Often I have snow on the ground until early April.
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Old 03-19-2012, 01:22 AM
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Snow will not likely hurt it any.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:31 PM
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I am in KY up on the Ohio River. I planted my garlic in October, and since it was so warm it grew pretty tall last fall. Now, we had a pretty mild winter so I didn't bother to mulch. It looks great now. I have in the past overwintered my garlic even when cold with mulch. You should be perfectly fine, even being that much further north.
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Old 03-22-2012, 09:53 AM
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My garlic is about 9 inches tall......is this bad?
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Old 03-24-2012, 02:48 PM
Bondo Male Bondo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura View Post
My garlic is about 9 inches tall......is this bad?
Garlic is pretty hardy, so I would say that is not a problem, unless you expect some snow or something!

Seriously, mine overwintered at about that height last winter.
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Old 03-24-2012, 03:01 PM
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I don't want to hijack here, but I do have a garlic question that I don't have a good answer to and this seems good a place as any to ask. I have a full bulb of volunteers that evidently I didn't dig last year- So I have seven or eight bunches shooting up from one small spot. Anybody had any luck seperating these bulbs growing like that and re planting?
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Old 03-24-2012, 04:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
Garlic is pretty hardy, so I would say that is not a problem, unless you expect some snow or something!

Seriously, mine overwintered at about that height last winter.
Snow at this point won;t hurt a thing.

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Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
I don't want to hijack here, but I do have a garlic question that I don't have a good answer to and this seems good a place as any to ask. I have a full bulb of volunteers that evidently I didn't dig last year- So I have seven or eight bunches shooting up from one small spot. Anybody had any luck seperating these bulbs growing like that and re planting?
I would say dig them up and transplant them to find out. They won't make anything the way they are so you are not out anything trying.
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Old 03-25-2012, 06:07 PM
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Thanks for the replies.
To be clear wintering over is not my concern.
My concern is and remains whether the shoots, which are quite early this year, are vulnerable to weather they ordinarily would not be exposed too. With the crazy weather this year who knows, but any other year accumulating snow through mid April is not uncommon, as well as hard frosts. The low Monday night is going to be around 20.

Just have to wait and see.
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Old 04-13-2012, 03:14 PM
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A little more reference to dealing with the cold and frost and garlic that is already up this year, we have had frost the last four or so mornings, and yesterday morning, it got down to about twenty eight- at least under my covered porch where my thermometer lead is.

Garlic looks good as it did when it was eight degrees a couple weeks ago.
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Old 04-13-2012, 11:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
A little more reference to dealing with the cold and frost and garlic that is already up this year, we have had frost the last four or so mornings, and yesterday morning, it got down to about twenty eight- at least under my covered porch where my thermometer lead is.

Garlic looks good as it did when it was eight degrees a couple weeks ago.
Same here.
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Old 04-17-2012, 08:42 PM
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Well IMO the garlic is looking pretty sad.

We've been having some cold weather.
Picked up a 1/2" of snow last week. At least 1/2 half of the shoots look dead/dying. Still some green down in between the withering shoots, so I guess I will need to keep my fingers crossed.

Of course it may be completely unrelated to the weather.
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Old 02-28-2016, 07:54 PM
samie samie is offline
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I am in zone 6 and th garlic that I planted in the fall is sprouting under the hay mulch, my flower bulbs are also sprouting, we have had a somewhat warm winter.

It will probably drop below freezing a number of times before frost has passed.

Since they are sprouting should I remove the mulch so they can get sun or leave it on until danger of frost has passed?

Any help appreciated, I would hate for the garlic to be ruined.
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Old 02-29-2016, 01:19 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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I have had garlic sprout then freeze. It didn't hurt it at all. It simply went dormant again and resprouted later.
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:29 PM
grumpa Male grumpa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doninalaska View Post
I have had garlic sprout then freeze. It didn't hurt it at all. It simply went dormant again and resprouted later.
That's precisely what it will do.

Bondo to answer your question, yes you can separate the bulbs and plant them individually. That's per the Mrs.
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Old 03-03-2016, 06:18 PM
samie samie is offline
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Thanks! It's supposed to be 70 next week now it is about 25-crazy
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