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Hunting/Fishing/Trapping Hunting, Fishing, Trapping and related conversations.

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  #1  
Old 06-25-2012, 02:32 PM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
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Default Fishing for survival

I read a lot of information on this forum and other sites about hunting. But what I never read is about fishing. Fishing seems to be more stealthy in that it does not make noise and it is done in secluded locations. It also takes less energy (if you know what you are doing). I have been an avid fisherman for many years and have mastered both fly fishing and surf fishing. It seems that fly fishing is the perfect answer for those located near lakes, streams, rivers. I can carry the "pack able fly rod and all fly's in a small section of a back pack. In fact all of the fly's will fit in the pocket of my shirt and the fly rod breaks down in four sections at 20" each. I always catch a lot of bream and small bass in the span of about two hours from shore, if in the canoe x3. I make all of my own fly's (hoppers, ants, etc). If in survival mode and you fish at night your catch will go up x2. Has anyone else given thought to this? or tried this?
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:55 PM
LonghornGardens Male LonghornGardens is offline
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I was thinking about making a few large fish traps. Does that count?
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Old 06-25-2012, 03:08 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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I have after viewing a survival show with a man and his wife catching a fish with a small fishing pack he had in his backpack. We are about eighteen miles from a river where catfish is abundant and within walking distance of remote a pond with bass and perch. I went online looking for portable fishing rods and found a few, they look easy put together, inexpensive, and don't take much room in a backpack.
Thanks
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Old 06-25-2012, 03:43 PM
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When I used to have time to backpack, I put together a small, emergency fishing kit for just this purpose. It consisted of a 5' telescoping rod, that collapses down to about 10" and weighs less than half a pound, an ultra-light Pflueger open faced spinning reel, a nylon stringer and a double sided Plano mini box, roughly 4" x 6" x 2" thick, loaded with my pick of 2" grubs, Rebel crawdads and other baits that I regularly catch fish with from the small rivers, creeks and ponds, and of course a good assortment of hooks, weights and such. The whole package weighs less than 2 pounds and easily fits in the pack. Throw in a couple yo-yo's, a small trot line or tackle to make some limb lines and for less than 3 pounds I always felt like I could put a fish or two in the pan under most conditions.

I like your idea of a fly rod for all the reasons you've mentioned. I just was never any good with a fly rod.
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Old 06-25-2012, 04:32 PM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
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Thanks all for your response.

Longhorn: I was thinking about making a few large fish traps. Does that count?

That would be ok if you had the right type of stream, not to deep or wide and close to home. Might look funny when you are bugging out with a large fish trap on your bike. Don't forget that others will steal from you if they find the trap.

A few years ago I was in the same position as a lot of people and thought it would be good to take some kind of fishing equipment with me and then it dawned that you need to LEARN how to fish. This is not as easy as one would think. Do you know how to read the water, how to fish different moon cycles, what type of hatches the fish are looking for, how to present the bait so as to attract the fish, what are the best times of the day for the fish to feed, how to fight the fish so you don't loose your bait?

See what I mean when I say "if you know what you are doing". Years ago I joined a fly fishing club for this very purpose and my eyes were opened to what I had to learn. Including how to cast, make fly's plus all the above. If you just buy the equipment and never learn how to use it you will be in trouble when TSHTF.

As a benefit for my fishing efforts I regularly bring home enough fish for several meals. We have not had to buy (farm raised) fish in years.

With all the above said let me say this about fish:

1. Bream and all Sun fish family, safe because it feeds on insects or small minows

2. Bass (this is in the Sun fish family), safe because of the above and feeds on small fish, including bream. although it can have high levels of mercury if eaten to often.

3. Catfish, depends on the river. They are bottom feeders. Maybe one meal a month.

4. Trout, the best, only lives in very clean water. The higher you go in elevation the better.
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Old 06-25-2012, 07:50 PM
LonghornGardens Male LonghornGardens is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offtheradar View Post
That would be ok if you had the right type of stream, not to deep or wide and close to home. Might look funny when you are bugging out with a large fish trap on your bike. Don't forget that others will steal from you if they find the trap.
I have a farm with a lake so I have no plans to bug out. I figure traps would not be real noticable so I am not too worried about theft and while you are flyfishing I could be working in my garden, chopping wood, cleaning guns, or sipping on a mohito in my hammock while we basically are both still catching fish.

I am not knocking your idea, but I have given it some thought and I could justify leaving on short patrols to check traps once or twice a day either in my lake or nearby streams. Leaving my farm all day is out of the question for me personally.

I also feel that the more you are away from your base of operations the more likely you are to become a target.
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Old 06-26-2012, 01:16 AM
joyce pierce Female joyce pierce is offline
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our family likes to camp and fish. we do so several times during the year. but on a[day to day] sort ,if we need or want fresh fish we have a lake we can go to. we do fish a lot at a friends pond to help keep it balanced with catfish,bream,bass and crappie.
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Old 06-27-2012, 01:29 AM
patience patience is offline
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I remember the old saying, "Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat and drink beer all day."

Based on that, I have little interest in "fishing" in that sense, but if it produces meat in significant amounts, then I'm interested. In SHTF situation, I'm sure I could come up wth PRODUCTIVE ways to fish....
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Old 06-27-2012, 05:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patience View Post
but if it produces meat in significant amounts, then I'm interested.
I've never had much luck with a pole hooks and all that.
If it's for survival, I'll cheat!
I've got a net, and maybe I'll get some of those automatic fishing lines.
http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/ZWN-272

As tricky as it sounds I think I'd actually like bow fishing.

The OP is right. I like the idea anyway.
It's something productive to do when you are tired.
Most places you are away from others, and it's quiet.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:35 AM
Paw_Paw_Drew Male Paw_Paw_Drew is offline
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Shhhhh You will give away my plan.
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Old 06-27-2012, 01:04 PM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
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10% of the fishermen get 90% of the fish. It wasn't until I got involved in some fishing clubs that found out why.

Would you just start canning when the SHTF? Would you get into gardening just when the SHTF? Or raising chickens?

I look at survival as a multifaceted discipline that one should practice, practice, practice and fishing is one.
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:09 PM
LonghornGardens Male LonghornGardens is offline
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DavidOH, That is the first time I have seen those automatic reels. Do you catch anything other than catfish on them? I might have to pick up a pack of those.
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:06 PM
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DavidOH Male DavidOH is offline
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Lightbulb fishing yoyo

LG
I picked up one from eBay for about $4 and have not tried it yet.

Just search for "fishing yoyo" and you will find many.
The gun store on my other link sells them cheaper by the dozen.
Judging by the reviews they work very well. It's a litter bigger than 2 inches.
According to Stu :
" I got nine decent channel cats and a bass on the first circuit of bait! "

I agree o-t-r, I have no skill.
There are a couple creeks and lakes nearby, but I have not fished much.
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Old 06-28-2012, 05:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidOH View Post
If it's for survival, I'll cheat!
I've got a net, and maybe I'll get some of those automatic fishing lines.
http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/ZWN-272
The big benefit I see with Yo Yo fishing is that it allows you to multi-task. While the fishing machine is at work, you can be working on shelter, food prep or a gazillion other necessities for getting along.

Include trot-lines, throw lines, fish traps, rubber band lines etc. in the list of ways to fish without having to be there.
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Old 07-01-2012, 10:19 AM
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Thumbs up trot-lines

Yes, that's the idea. Here is the complete quote from one of the reviews:

***** Like A Magic Trick! - 3/24/2010
Reviewer: Stu Baggerly
I ordered up a dozen of these things, having seen them before at Reelfoot lake. I took them with me on a fishing trip to Patoka lake, here in Indiana. Man, do these things work! The group I went with always has a fish fry on the last night of the trip. Depending on how well we do, but last year we had to go out to eat. This time, just as an insurance measure, I set out 10 of these (state limit). Each of them secured to a limb having a 3/0 circle hook installed. The bait used was either small bluegill or a few minnows. Since I was running the beer boat doing laps around the lake, I would check my "traps" to see if it worked. I got nine decent channel cats and a bass on the first circuit of bait! I did find one missing on morning two, but the whole limb was gone! I would liked to have seen whatever took that one!


Never thought of traps. If you can make them less visible (underwater) then anyone coming along may pass them by.
You don't want to use those bright Red or Highly Visible bobbers (floats or whatever you call them in your area). That would just make it easier for someone else to harvest from your lines.
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Old 07-01-2012, 11:47 AM
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Here is Tx the more deeper creeks and water-ways
are used for trot lines-fishing.-

This is more labor intensive--If you are near enough to
able to check your lines.
Some have little 12ft boats--paddle out and remove the catch.
Save your bleach bottle or any large pasltic jugs as markers.

Although catfish are more labor intensive--a big ole catfish will
feed a large family.

Also marking with plastic jugs helps others avoid your lines.

Txanne
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Old 07-11-2013, 04:28 PM
Wanderer0101 Wanderer0101 is offline
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Trot lines,hand lines, cast nets, gill nets, Yo Yos, fishing spears (Thai preferrably); they all should be part of your preps if you are near water or will be.
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:16 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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I don't know a thing about fishing, but I know one thing. If the SHTF, very soon there won't be a fish, bull frog, crawdad, turkey, groundhog, deer, etc. to be found. Everybody will have the same idea, fish and hunt. I would like to raise fish for food, but I can not do everything. Sepp Holzer raises fish in several ponds without feeding them, enough to sell to restaurants. He has floating solar lights on his ponds.
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:31 AM
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It seems at one time quite a while ago I read on another forum that if you are put in a situation where you must depend on fishing for basic survival nutrition...... You are in a bad way before you ever begin..... I don't recall details of why....

Now fishing to supplement a basic survival diet is a completely different thing.
In that case fishing is a great resource.... If there is enough resource available.....

Now the part of the country you are in (weather etc.) will determine how much of a resource this is compared to the energy you have to expend to get it..... For instance here in zone 3 I am close to plenty of water, but not crazy about expending the energy to get through the ice during winter.....

Kind of a "if you have it, use it" thing....
Good luck
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:37 AM
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It's serendipitous that this thread got bumped just lately. For our next camping trip my survival training agenda is going to include at least one meal harvested from the environment.

Part of my go gear includes a generous swath of mosquito netting. I want to try fixing up a minnow net. The way I see it, I can spend a couple of hours trying to catch a meal or I can just gobble up a dozen or so minnows and/or frogs caught with the net. It would be a good source for bait too, I figure.
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