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Livestock/Horses Cows, sheep, pigs, goats, llamas, and other four-legged friends.

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  #1  
Old 10-02-2012, 09:46 AM
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momma_to_seven_chi Female momma_to_seven_chi is offline
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Default Swine are dangerous

I know we have talked about this before, and I wanted to post the news link.
http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012...ors_picks=true

When my husband managed the big confinement years back there was a rule that nobody went into the lots alone. The older worker there would tell stories about how hogs ate someone he knew when he was young. I think we have all heard stories about the voracity of swine. They can be scary animals.
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:49 AM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Yes, my grandparents always talked about a toddler that fell off the porch and was partially eaten by a hog before they parents could rescue it. Back in those days, the pigs were let out to wander and feed on chestnuts in the woods.
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Old 10-02-2012, 11:53 AM
whitehairedidiot Female whitehairedidiot is offline
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They can be scary.

We had a mare that was getting crazy unruly, that we were trying to separate from the rest of the horses. When she went off & hooves were flyin' I ducked into the adjacent pig run... and got chased back into the corral with the mare -- she was less scary to me.
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Old 10-02-2012, 12:01 PM
brushhippie brushhippie is offline
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Had one clamp down on my leg when I was a kid, had been in and out of that pen a thousand times, that was the last....you moved the trough? too bad!
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Old 10-02-2012, 02:41 PM
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My Grandfather made it through WW1 and came home OK.

A big old sow gave him the limp I remember till the day he died.

I think domestic swine are the number one rated animal to be able to survive if suddenly turned away from there domestic life.

Keep safe.
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Old 10-02-2012, 03:33 PM
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momma_to_seven_chi Female momma_to_seven_chi is offline
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Originally Posted by wildturnip View Post
Yes, my grandparents always talked about a toddler that fell off the porch and was partially eaten by a hog before they parents could rescue it. Back in those days, the pigs were let out to wander and feed on chestnuts in the woods.
My grandparents let their wander the property like dogs. They only had 2-3 at a time though. And when they farrowed, they were penned with their piglets until they were sold as feeders. They mainly just kept a couple to fatten and slaughter each winter. Those were the ones that wandered the farm to eat anything and fatten up.
At the confinement there were breeding pens of 40 each and of course the nursery and the farrowing building were all full. They had some growing out pens too. The numbers of them just made them dangerous.
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Old 10-02-2012, 04:30 PM
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An old boar can slash you to death within a few minutes with those big sharp front tushes.
Saw a big Rot/pit mix laid open from his chest to his behind and he was a traiined hog dog.
When they shot and killed him---skinning him they found many slugs where he'd been shot and it had no affect.
Hog hunters told me---shoot them between the eyes--kinda hard to do-running for a tree.
And I lived with seasonal hogs when I was off grid.
Ponds are their favorite mud holes.

Sows will root you to death and very very dangerous with a litter.

I have a healthy respect for them.

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Old 10-02-2012, 04:32 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Rescue wasn't the proper word about the toddler. It's didn't survive.

My grandpa kept his in a pen but his two sisters let theirs roam at certain times of the year. Iwas well-trained to head for the house if I saw those pigs! Grandma hated them because they would get in her yard and root up her flowers.
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:24 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Once while driving with DD a wild sow ran across the road, I yelled, look, a wild pig, and here come five, six, seven striped piglets after her. we could not miss them all and hit two. DD stopped and I got out of the car to pull them off the road. Then it dawned and I high tailed it into the car. good thing the momma sow did not turn around and look for her missing piglets.
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Old 10-03-2012, 12:02 AM
mo4pintn mo4pintn is offline
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Our pig has nipped at my son's leg and my pants legs. She follows you around. We have since wired the water trough to the fence so she can't dump it and drag it off in the mud. We have just started putting her food on the ground because she will carry off all of the feed pans. My daughter gave her some bread and milk in a dishpan today and she carried it off and broke it. When my 17 yr old daughter went in to get it, Miss Piggy scared her. We have gotten so that if one of us has to go in the pen for anything two will work together. One will use the water hose and spray her in the face so the other can get in to do whatever is necessary.

It has definitely been a learning experience since we got the cute little pig a few months back. Once this pig is killed, we will get better prepared for when we raise the next one. We have learned a lot this year that I would hate to have had to learn in the middle of SHTF. We can be better prepared for pigs in the future go rounds.
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Old 10-03-2012, 03:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mo4pintn View Post
Our pig has nipped at my son's leg and my pants legs. She follows you around. We have since wired the water trough to the fence so she can't dump it and drag it off in the mud. We have just started putting her food on the ground because she will carry off all of the feed pans. My daughter gave her some bread and milk in a dishpan today and she carried it off and broke it. When my 17 yr old daughter went in to get it, Miss Piggy scared her. We have gotten so that if one of us has to go in the pen for anything two will work together. One will use the water hose and spray her in the face so the other can get in to do whatever is necessary.

It has definitely been a learning experience since we got the cute little pig a few months back. Once this pig is killed, we will get better prepared for when we raise the next one. We have learned a lot this year that I would hate to have had to learn in the middle of SHTF. We can be better prepared for pigs in the future go rounds.
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Sounds as you have an animal with an attitude. Not a good thing.
If I had this problem, I would consider the soonest possible date to convert to packaged meat........... KnowwhatImean

Keep safe
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Old 10-04-2012, 12:04 AM
mo4pintn mo4pintn is offline
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It won't be long before we have some good bacon! Just got to clean out some more freezer space by canning up some stuff. She got out today and went to visit our neighbors with the million dollar house. Son and daughter went to run her home. The finicky pig was visiting their chickens, ours weren't good enough. All they had to do was call her name "Miss Piggy" and clap their hands and she came to them. They walked behind her and she headed home. Once she saw the gate open to the garden, she headed in. I got some feed out for her and shook it so she could hear it and led her back into her pen. Then we had to find where she got out at and put in more posts and fix the wire. The kids are ready for some good bacon too.
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Old 10-07-2012, 04:28 AM
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They make good bacon when quite small and young. I would never have an adult pig on the place although the weenlings are fine. I do not think it wise to have an adult pig unless one has a lot of experience and really good facilities focused on safety.
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Old 10-07-2012, 12:10 PM
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The problem is if a hog gets the taste of blood. Once they have, they're nuts in the head. When you leave hogs roam wild like my grandma said they used to do down south, the hogs eat whatever they rustle up which will lead to them eating small animals and they get the taste of blood, so you're fair game.

A sow with pigs is understandably protective, respect that!

Years ago I knew some farmers who were too conservative to lose money when they lost a sheep, chicken, etc.. so they'd throw the dead critter, sometimes even a cow or horse, in the hog pen. The hogs ate the critters and they justified it as at least the dead critter was used for feed.

I remember doing chores for a farmer like that as a kid but he warned, don't ever go in that pen alone because if you get pushed down in there, you're a goner.

We raised hogs at home and my grandfather considered throwing dead critters to the hogs a dirty sinful practice and our hogs were always very tame, you could even walk in and scratch all the sows on the back, just don't pick up one of their wee piglets and make it squeal or Mama would come to their rescue. We'd pen them up close when we'd castrate, then lift the boars out, and toss the gilts if we caught one or the newly made barrow over the fence to their mama's who were waiting in the big pen outside chuffing away because they'd hear their little darlings a squealing in the hog house.
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:06 PM
Pitdog Pitdog is offline
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I have had hogs for a number of years and some have been better than other. Napolean was a Duroc and he was about 350 when I sold him. He lost an ear in a fight with one of my dogs- I hated him and was glad to be rid of him. All of those pigs were awful and for a while I wouldn't have another.
Now I have Officer Poncharello, and he is over 400. Tame is not the word for him, he will laydown like a dog if you scratch him and go to sleep. I have three sows for him as his ladies and they are well tempered too, however they are destined for the freezer, as I recently bought two registered Berkshire sows. Once I find a Berkshire boar, Ponch will too follow the path to the freezer.
Hogs will act the way they do, based on breed characteristics and treatment. I had some ill tempered Yorks....and they went to the freezer, the main thing is to make sure the bad ones aren't around to cause trouble.
The article states that 'this is very unsusal' and it isn't, happened more than a few times and in NC where there are many hog farms, one old gentleman went down with what they believe was a heart attack and all they found was his wedding band when they pressure washed the floor of the hog house.
Any animal can be dangerous, cows, bulls, rams, billy goats..... weed em out.
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Old 12-18-2012, 03:15 AM
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Had a sow in highschool as a FFA project. She had 5 litters in her life. All five I was in the pen with her. Was told b many that was the dumbest thing I could do, but she was very upset when she would farrow until I got in the pen with her. The second time it happend, Grandpa came dow to see for himself. I didnt find out till later that he had his .357 in his pocket just in case. After her 5th litter, she started to get grumpy. Took a couple of her youngens for a snack and then when she snapped at me, I called Grandpa and we took her to the smoke house. Would I do it today? No. I think it had a lot to do with the fact that I raised her from a gilt, she had never tasted blood and was a happy pig.
But got to add. 2 sides of bacon almost 3 ft each. She kept us in Ham for 2 years. Good pig
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Old 04-12-2014, 01:10 AM
annabella1 annabella1 is offline
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My mom had a pet pig "penny" when she was 8 years old in 1931. She had raised it herself and it was so tame she would ride it to school, the pig would either hang out at the school or walk home, but would always know when it was time to come and get mom. It came time to butcher and mom said she had to go hide her head under her pillow, while the deed was done. But really enjoyed the meat after it had been processed.
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Old 04-12-2014, 08:23 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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I only have 2 at a time, and I keep them confined to a pasture. I have never had them get aggressive, but they are gone before they hit 300 pounds--I try to get them butchered around 250.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dame View Post
They make good bacon when quite small and young. I would never have an adult pig on the place although the weenlings are fine. I do not think it wise to have an adult pig unless one has a lot of experience and really good facilities focused on safety.
We don't let ours get too big, which avoids problems with them getting difficult to handle. It's my boyfriend's birthday at the weekend and we've got a 10 week old piglet who is due to be the guest of honor

(I'd better add we normally let them get bigger than that, but my boyfriend is a fan of suckling pig and the meat is wonderful and tender at that age)

Last edited by susiev2; 03-04-2015 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:39 AM
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Will javelina count as pigs for this discussion? If not, quit reading now.
Some years back my brother and I enjoyed camping and hunting deer and javelina in the Texas hill country. We camped on a place right next door to some former rancher neighbors whose teenage son had a pet javelina sow about two years old. He got her after her mother was killed and bottle fed her. She seemed to be a very tame critter for a javelina; never showed aggressiveness toward us anyhow.
Down the road, another rancher had two very large German Shepherd dogs. Beautiful beast but very mean toward everybody and thing.
Those dogs cornered that sow one day and we witnessed the outcome. She was maybe a third the size of either dog but she slashed them both to death faster than four grown men could reach the fight to separate them all.
My take: don't mess with javelina, Leave 'em alone-- tame or wild.

oeb
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