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Old 10-29-2012, 04:09 PM
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Txanne Female Txanne is offline
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Default Time for Winter Sewing

It has cooled off now and many of our sewers/crafters will be starting our winter projects.

I am cutting-out/getting ready to sew more aprons.
Had an order for 4 tough plain janes from a small cafe with center pockets.

What are your plans?
Interest this winter--I know most have so much todo in the summer and for me it was too hot to work on my hobby/maybe make some money.

Whats your project?

Txannw
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:58 PM
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I've spent the last week cleaning and organizing my sewing room. For some reason it tends to get so stacked up when not in use. LOL.

Next few months will make up for the time I've neglected the sewing machine... finishing up a few unfinished dresses for DD, PJs and lounge pants for Christmas for the kiddos, and then some maternity clothes for me and newborn gowns for the wee one.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:52 PM
whitehairedidiot Female whitehairedidiot is offline
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I finally found what I was looking for - newborn layettes - in the Simplicity catalog. They also had a cute pattern for shoes... and some vintage styles. Next up: trying to find fabric in my stash that'll work... or ordering online.
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Old 10-30-2012, 09:57 AM
mozarkian mozarkian is offline
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Here I trying desperately to finish quilts for the boys (2 DS's and a step DGS) for Christmas-- nothing fancy- just denim and flannel squares (wouldn't want to jeopardize anybody's manhood or anything - LOL). The boys work out of town and DGS is off at college so they need rugged, but warm quilts. Future DIL and step DGD like matching things, so are getting quilted vests that I hope to finish some embroidery on before Thanksgiving so I can get them put together in time for Christmas. My hands and eyes don't work as good as they used to so that's been a slow process. Other than that a friend's new baby son needs something very special made, hubs and I both need new work shirts made, he wants a new hunter orange vest (before deer season!) and there is literally a mountain of blue jeans to mend. Only thing I like about less daylight time outside is more time to sew inside! Kind of nice on a rainy day to put a pot of soup on the stove, some bread in the oven and just sew the day away!
Doing a lot of this on my treadle ---it dates from the thirties and shows it's age a little but sews like a dream. Belonged to an elderly farm wife who sewed on it until she past a few years back. One nice thing about getting older is I don't stress about all the stuff needing done so much now, just do some every day and am always surprised how much can get done! Happy sewing ladies!
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Old 10-30-2012, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mozarkian View Post
Here I trying desperately to finish quilts for the boys (2 DS's and a step DGS) for Christmas-- nothing fancy- just denim and flannel squares (wouldn't want to jeopardize anybody's manhood or anything - LOL). The boys work out of town and DGS is off at college so they need rugged, but warm quilts. Future DIL and step DGD like matching things, so are getting quilted vests that I hope to finish some embroidery on before Thanksgiving so I can get them put together in time for Christmas. My hands and eyes don't work as good as they used to so that's been a slow process. Other than that a friend's new baby son needs something very special made, hubs and I both need new work shirts made, he wants a new hunter orange vest (before deer season!) and there is literally a mountain of blue jeans to mend. Only thing I like about less daylight time outside is more time to sew inside! Kind of nice on a rainy day to put a pot of soup on the stove, some bread in the oven and just sew the day away!
Doing a lot of this on my treadle ---it dates from the thirties and shows it's age a little but sews like a dream. Belonged to an elderly farm wife who sewed on it until she past a few years back. One nice thing about getting older is I don't stress about all the stuff needing done so much now, just do some every day and am always surprised how much can get done! Happy sewing ladies!

How nice---your treadle is a work horse.
I love the rainy cold days---noone knocks on my door and I can cut out or sew or lay out fabric and plan.
I remember the days of jeans---once the knees gave up the ghost and were past a small patch--I cut them off and hemmed them for summer use--saved all my cut-off material.

I dont know why I am fascinated with aprons---but my great-Gmaw seemed like she was born with one on.
When she came out of her room in the morning she had one on.
Of course she never worn any kind of jeans etc. And dont think she had but a few dresses.

She tatted baby layettes and sold many pieces to make a living after my Great grand-father died.
He ties fishing net for the shrimpers along the coast----how inventive they were.

Good sewing ladies--our quiet gentle times.
annie
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Old 11-05-2012, 10:23 PM
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I found something today---gave me an idea---.

Placemats----use them to make pockest for my aprons.
These were christmas ones----didnt appear to have been used--at GW.
I went looking for books.

I can get 2 pockest out of each one----Thats my signature--their called Happy Pockets
and each one (apron) is different.
I will have to bind them--so the stuffing doesnt come out---but that will add to the pockets look also
They were 20c a piece--cheaper than material.

After I got the idea---I found others--not seasonal.
I usually only buy what colors will work with muslin.

I was kinda proud of myself---using my head like that---Sometimes my old brain does function.

annie
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Old 11-06-2012, 12:17 PM
woodchuck acres woodchuck acres is offline
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I'd love to know where you sewers are getting fabric these days. We live over 20 miles from the nearest Walmart and even there I'm appalled at the price per yard. Nearest Joanns and Hancocks are almost 40 miles. I just can't bring myself to pay more than a couple of bucks per yard for cottons. I'd love to make some aprons (love 'em too) but my hand won't go into the wallet if it's gonna cost this much! Help! my treadle has been idle too long.
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Old 11-06-2012, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by woodchuck acres View Post
I'd love to know where you sewers are getting fabric these days. We live over 20 miles from the nearest Walmart and even there I'm appalled at the price per yard. Nearest Joanns and Hancocks are almost 40 miles. I just can't bring myself to pay more than a couple of bucks per yard for cottons. I'd love to make some aprons (love 'em too) but my hand won't go into the wallet if it's gonna cost this much! Help! my treadle has been idle too long.
The fabric from WM is cheap china stuff--its used basically for crafts that arent washed.

Real cotton---was $5.44 a yard.
My muslin was 5.97 a yd but is 108 inches wide--so I can get quite a few out of a couple of yds.(at WM)and its preshunk)

The only Hancock is about 80 miles from me.
And they have the best prices.

Joanns is way out of my price range.
We have to hunt harder now for ((real)) fabric.

annie
if it wont take washing---I cant buy it.
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Old 11-06-2012, 03:34 PM
whitehairedidiot Female whitehairedidiot is offline
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Woodchuck, I'm in the same boat. It's 90 min to drive into the city to find a fabric shop. I have a stash - always had - but still, there are just things you need or want to buy just for a project.

That leaves buying online. I used an online store for the satin for Ds wedding dress: they sent me a sample before I ordered. And at that time, I had a whole folder of bookmarks... no more. Gonna have to start over.

But one shortcut I can recommend is Threads Magazine. Website is:
http://www.threadsmagazine.com

The link to the advertisers/products unfortunately is misleading. But in collecting my bookmarks back - found the one online store I used for Holly's dress:

www.denverfabrics.com

Last edited by whitehairedidiot; 11-06-2012 at 03:54 PM. Reason: update
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Old 11-06-2012, 04:32 PM
mozarkian mozarkian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodchuck acres View Post
I'd love to know where you sewers are getting fabric these days. We live over 20 miles from the nearest Walmart and even there I'm appalled at the price per yard. Nearest Joanns and Hancocks are almost 40 miles. I just can't bring myself to pay more than a couple of bucks per yard for cottons. I'd love to make some aprons (love 'em too) but my hand won't go into the wallet if it's gonna cost this much! Help! my treadle has been idle too long.
I buy some online, (Amazon mostly, because I get free shipping with my Kindle Prime membership) and have found some from time to time at yard sales and farm auctions. I have kept a stash for years even when I had no time to sew from it. Years ago I worked in the garment industry and collected a lot of denim, and sturdy fabrics back then. I walked through our Walmart fabric section the other day and there was little there except cheap, ugly gaudy stuff. Also have been known to buy good quality clothing at yard sales and then salvage the fabric, buttons, zippers, trim etc from them.

Annie, you should makes some aprons and advertise them online -- maybe on Etsy.
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Old 11-06-2012, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by mozarkian View Post
I buy some online, (Amazon mostly, because I get free shipping with my Kindle Prime membership) and have found some from time to time at yard sales and farm auctions. I have kept a stash for years even when I had no time to sew from it. Years ago I worked in the garment industry and collected a lot of denim, and sturdy fabrics back then. I walked through our Walmart fabric section the other day and there was little there except cheap, ugly gaudy stuff. Also have been known to buy good quality clothing at yard sales and then salvage the fabric, buttons, zippers, trim etc from them.

Annie, you should makes some aprons and advertise them online -- maybe on Etsy.
I have gotten the mailing part down--about $3.40 per apron---regular mail is almost faster than priority----
I have tried to think about advertizing---I need away to post pics--dont have a camera on here--hooked up----This winter I hope I get that done.

What worries me is people being able to pay what I would needed to make back expences and make a little profit.
Many times I have sent them as gifts---strange hobby I know--but i like putting the colors togather.
Tks for the suggestion and the fabric links
annie
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Old 11-06-2012, 06:03 PM
whitehairedidiot Female whitehairedidiot is offline
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Hey Annie - I've been seeing aprons here priced at $15.00 - $35.00. And yep; selling too.
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Old 11-06-2012, 08:15 PM
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Hey Annie - I've been seeing aprons here priced at $15.00 - $35.00. And yep; selling too.
They have some at WM--about a 1/2 yd of material --sides bound in bias tape for $19.99.
They are cheap made---

Mine have deep pockests---long sashes for a one size fits all.
I am very chosey about my material---Because these are to be used---canning---washing,
wiping notty -noses--etc etc.

And must be washable----not a hang on a hook for looks although are very pretty.

I was thinking between 22.50----30.00--that includes postage.

annie
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Old 11-06-2012, 11:29 PM
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Default Goodwill for fabric

At our local Goodwill store, one day of the week is designated as 25 cent tag day. All clothing items with a certain color tag are 25 cents. For example, I like to buy men's cotton shirts in the largest sizes and then cut them apart to use for various sewing projects. Lots of good fabric for a tiny price.
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Old 11-07-2012, 12:27 PM
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Great thread, Annie! I hope you will share some photos of your aprons when they're done.

I am a beginner sewer, but I am trying my hand at making simple quilts for my two boys. (Just patchwork squares in a random pattern.) They really need more blankets and I'm trying to make two quilts for essentially nothing. I'm using bits of fabric I got from my grandma's stash, stuff a friend gave me, old blue jeans, flannel sheets my mom gave me for the lining, etc. The only thing I spent was $10 for some really cute horse fabric, since my 4 year old is in love with horses. Hopefully I'll be done the quilts soon as we just had our first freeze last night!

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodchuck acres View Post
I'd love to know where you sewers are getting fabric these days. We live over 20 miles from the nearest Walmart and even there I'm appalled at the price per yard. Nearest Joanns and Hancocks are almost 40 miles. I just can't bring myself to pay more than a couple of bucks per yard for cottons. I'd love to make some aprons (love 'em too) but my hand won't go into the wallet if it's gonna cost this much! Help! my treadle has been idle too long.
I have been lucky in that many people I know have donated to my stash of fabric since I am just trying to get started. But of the stuff I've bought myself, little of it has been at a fabric store. I've bought a bit online on Etsy - some of the stuff there is designer fabric and very expensive, but occasionally you can get good deals. I've bought fabric at the thrift store, and I find the best deal there is to buy old sheets - I got a super twin flat sheet covered in pictures of race cars for only $2.99, it's still in great shape and will make a perfect backing for my 7 year old's quilt.

In Canada, we have a store called Fabricland (at least I think it's Canadian?) and although they're normally really expensive, sometimes they have really good sales (like buy one yard get two free) and that's when I buy fabric at the store. I would never pay full price though.
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Old 11-07-2012, 12:54 PM
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I hear ya about fabric, Annie.
I'm pretty picky too. That's one of the difficult things about buying fabric online - I have to touch it, see how folds, wrinkles, stretches. Maybe later today, I'll do some deep looking into the web sites I found.

Most of the baby clothes yardages are a yard or less... so once I make some space downstairs, will be pulling my stash out to look there first. My MIL's patterns are from '52. I noticed that the seam allowances are 1/4 inch, instead of the usual 5/8... so I'll have to also remember where I put my tracing paper.

Thinking I might also make my mom happy -- and see if she can ship the rug frame that my grandpa built. It's for making hooked rugs on burlap, with strips of wool. Those rugs last forever. I still have some that were made in the 40s.
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Old 11-10-2012, 01:38 AM
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I hear ya about fabric, Annie.
I'm pretty picky too. That's one of the difficult things about buying fabric online - I have to touch it, see how folds, wrinkles, stretches. Maybe later today, I'll do some deep looking into the web sites I found.

Most of the baby clothes yardages are a yard or less... so once I make some space downstairs, will be pulling my stash out to look there first. My MIL's patterns are from '52. I noticed that the seam allowances are 1/4 inch, instead of the usual 5/8... so I'll have to also remember where I put my tracing paper.

Thinking I might also make my mom happy -- and see if she can ship the rug frame that my grandpa built. It's for making hooked rugs on burlap, with strips of wool. Those rugs last forever. I still have some that were made in the 40s.
Now that would be interesting---hooked rugs on burlap---I remember seeing some--never made one tho.

I have made myself a promise.
To save my sanity---Sunday is getting set back up day.

I am also checking (before I buy) if it frays easily---thats some miserable material to work with.
Sometimes I just to touch the fabrics----
annie
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Old 11-10-2012, 12:11 PM
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It's really pretty easy to make those kinds of rugs, Annie. Grandma had the big frame of course, but she also had 2 sizes of lap frames -- think 1/2 in x 3 in boards, with lap joints at the corners... They were maybe 16" and 18" square; like picture frames Then, with burlap stretched tight (wrapping it & tacking/basting it helps) you can draw your pattern on it with a sharpie. With the lap frames, you would hook squares... and these would get sewn/bound together on the back... to make runners, etc. Make sure you get cotton rug binding; some of the older rugs G'ma just hemmed the burlap under... and it doesn't wash or wear as well.

You need the biggest crochet hook you can find -- and some sort of way to make the handle fatter. G'pa made a hook from an old tool - like an awl - handle and ground a large nail, to make the hook. It was a little round at the end, and easily fit into the palm. I didn't like the straight handle hook as much. Blisters.

Grandma would save everything that was wool - socks, thin scarves, thick sweaters or blankets. We cut these apart at the seams, then would cut the wool into 1/4 in wide strips. Of course, you can dye wool pretty easily the color you want. (And the commercial hooked rugs & such, use a heavy wool yarn, when all else fails).

To hook, position the strip under the burlap... hold it about 3 inches from the end, insert hook from the top of the burlap, and pull up wool into a loop -- leaving a tail that will get either sewn or "spliced" into another loop, to secure it -- kinda like needlepoint. Easy, easy way to make a sturdy, washable, thick rug. (The rules are no vacumning with a spinning brush - just suction is OK; and hand-wash only with fels naptha. Sun dry only.)

OH - the thing to pay attention to, is when hooking, to keep your loops all the same height. That said, you could vary the heights to add texture to the rug. Usually the height is about 3/8 to a half inch high. And yeah, these rugs can get heavy! LOL...

Last edited by whitehairedidiot; 11-10-2012 at 12:42 PM. Reason: One more thing...
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Old 11-10-2012, 11:29 PM
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Default My stash

Most of my stash comes from yard sales and thrift stores. Also have had good luck getting the kind of thing I need at auctions, especially estate sales.
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Old 11-11-2012, 12:44 AM
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Most of my stash comes from yard sales and thrift stores. Also have had good luck getting the kind of thing I need at auctions, especially estate sales.
CG
I hadnt even thought of estate sales---a lady that sewed probably leaves a gold mine of fabric.

Thats a heads up---tks

annie
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