BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum

Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser


Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Beverage Making

Beverage Making Beer, wine, mead, soda, cider, spirits, cordials, etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-22-2013, 10:17 PM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 118
Default how long to ferment wine?

Ive got a jug of pear, and jug of apple wine happily bubbling away on a shelf in my kitchen. The problem is theyve been bubbling for nearly 3 weeks now. The instructions I got were to wait for them to stop bubbling, then filter and bottle them to age. Does 3 weeks seem out of line as far as how long to let them go? they are sealed with airlocks, and dont look bad or anything, should I just let them go? The bubbles are coming off the fruit, and I feel like if the fruit was gone it wouldnt be bubbling anymore so maybe then it would be the right time to bottle.....internet searches give so many different answers its hard to know whats what......thanks for any help
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-22-2013, 10:25 PM
Bones Bones is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 2,599
Default

I let my wine go over a year or more before I bottle it. Just make sure that you keep liquid in the airlock. oxygen is not good for the process. If you want something more ready to drink in a short period of time try beer.
__________________
" I void warranties"
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-22-2013, 10:35 PM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 118
Default

holy smokes! really!? Well that answers the question, I just didnt want to mess it up by letting it ride too long. Ill just wait for the bubbles to stop, and then shut it down. thanks for the info!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-23-2013, 12:14 AM
Grendal's Avatar
Grendal Male Grendal is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: East Greenwich, Rhode Island, United States
Posts: 1,420
Default

Well this is a complex answer. I never let mine ride on the lees. A year on lees is very bad. Lees are the bodies of all the little yeasty fellows we added and well I don't want that in my wine.

First there's two stages to wine fermentation primary and secondary aka aerobic and anaerobic fermentations. Aerobic (oxygen rich), and anaerobic (oxygen deprived).

Stage one is generally done during the first three to five days. 70% of your fermentation happens during the primary stage of fermentation.

Often this is not done, the lack of air hinders the doubling of yeast cells. I myself do not do this and will use an airlock.

During the secondary stage of fermentation the remaining 30 percent of fermentation activity occurs. This lasts one to two weeks depending on the amount of nutrient and sugars still available.

If you do like I do which is to me the cleanest and ultimately safest method, it can take a month. Then after you rack to a clearing vessel where you can let it clear for another month, to a year before bottling.

I find if letting it sit on the lees the wine will develop a musty or moldy taste. This is also a problem when using bakers yeast instead of wine yeast. This can be cleared up by stiring in one crushed campden tablet and a half ounce of activated carbon to each gallon of wine then allowing to settle 4-6 hours before stiring again. The stiring and waiting is done 4-6 times then left to sit for 24 hours undesturbed. When you rack you must rack through a double layer of muslin to catch the charcoal.

So generally 1 month depending on method (I've described method a), then racking to a clearing vessel.

My set up is a container with cheese cloth over gravel, topped with salt with blow off tube (1 inch) going in under the gravel.

http://www.midwestsupplies.com/1-lar...-per-foot.html

This goes onto my 6.5 gallon carboy

http://www.midwestsupplies.com/6-5-g...ss-carboy.html

The reason for this setup is salt and the cheese cloth will help prevent airborne contamination and wild yeasts from settling into my wine. This is mainly because I do a lot of baking and have a lot of baking yeast strains floating about. So I get the air without that baking yeast or other things in my wine high jacking it.

Method b is rather then clearing just bottling and letting it clear in the bottle. I myself prefere option a, clearing in a 3rd vessel.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-23-2013, 08:37 AM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 118
Default

thats not too complicated actually at all. I did use wine yeast, there is a homebrew place in town so procuring that wasnt an issue, same with decent airlocks. Im working in very small batches right now, this is more of an experiment then a real attempt to make anything. The real attempts to work in volume will come in the summer/fall when I can get the fruit for free. I will have mulberries, pears, apples and wild grapes available in abundance. Thanks for the pointers, that info helps!
Also the lady at the homebrew store told me I can ferment in culligan 5 gallon water bottles.........Im not so sure though as they seem to made from the wrong kind of plastic for safe fermenting.......any thought s there?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-23-2013, 02:54 PM
Grendal's Avatar
Grendal Male Grendal is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: East Greenwich, Rhode Island, United States
Posts: 1,420
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ejnovinsky View Post
thats not too complicated actually at all. I did use wine yeast, there is a homebrew place in town so procuring that wasnt an issue, same with decent airlocks. Im working in very small batches right now, this is more of an experiment then a real attempt to make anything. The real attempts to work in volume will come in the summer/fall when I can get the fruit for free. I will have mulberries, pears, apples and wild grapes available in abundance. Thanks for the pointers, that info helps!
Also the lady at the homebrew store told me I can ferment in culligan 5 gallon water bottles.........Im not so sure though as they seem to made from the wrong kind of plastic for safe fermenting.......any thought s there?
They are not something I would use at all. When looking for something like that your looking for BPA-free, DEHP-free, plasticizer-free. The best ones are made from PET rather then polycarbonate. PET is a resin of the polyester family, and sometimes this resin is mixed with glass fibers and undergoes a heat treatment. PET can leech antimony and Acetaldehyde if the conditions are right.

Polycarbonate is hydrolysis in nature meaning it degrades in water and releases bisphenol A. The FDA does have a food grade polycarbonate where it's made without these chemicals that leech out, but the FDA in my opinion takes way too many risks and often has a does not exceed a set amount, anything beyond that is not exceptible but anything below that is fine when it comes to chemicals. So avoid polycarbonate like it is the plague and stick to food grade PET.

I only use glass carboys.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-23-2013, 10:17 PM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 118
Default

Yeah I had a feeling she might be giving me some bad advice.......A friend that dabbles another form of beverage making said no plastic at all except for containers with a "2" in the little recycling triangle on the bottom. Cant remember now what he called that type of plastic.......ah yes, HDPE high density polyethylene....
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-23-2013, 10:57 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Nebraska
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,162
Default

I usually make beer, but have made wine.

I ferment in 5 or 6.5 gallon plastic buckets. Wine was interesting the first time because it doesn't ferment nearly as hard as beer. I was used to an airlock bubbling all the time, but with wine it's wasn't nearly as hard.

My first wine was made with a kit, and I left it a month before bottling. I've also made wine with concentrated white grape juice, 100% cranberry juice, and sugar. This I also left 1 month before bottling.

I saw a recipe on a forum using strawberries and sugar. This said to leave it in 3 days, bottle and burp the bottles for the next 10 days. This wine turned out very nice, at least a lot of my relatives liked it. But when you popped a bottle 6 or 8 months later, it still had carbination which I did not like.

I'm thinking of making this one again, since so many liked it, but leaving it one month like I did with the others, and then bottling.

When I make beer, which ferments much harder, I leave it 2 weeks and then bottle. Even then when you bottle you have to add sugar so it will carbonate.
__________________
Gun control: It's like fighting drunk driving by restricting the sober drivers.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-23-2013, 11:41 PM
Grendal's Avatar
Grendal Male Grendal is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: East Greenwich, Rhode Island, United States
Posts: 1,420
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post
I usually make beer, but have made wine.

I ferment in 5 or 6.5 gallon plastic buckets. Wine was interesting the first time because it doesn't ferment nearly as hard as beer. I was used to an airlock bubbling all the time, but with wine it's wasn't nearly as hard.

My first wine was made with a kit, and I left it a month before bottling. I've also made wine with concentrated white grape juice, 100% cranberry juice, and sugar. This I also left 1 month before bottling.

I saw a recipe on a forum using strawberries and sugar. This said to leave it in 3 days, bottle and burp the bottles for the next 10 days. This wine turned out very nice, at least a lot of my relatives liked it. But when you popped a bottle 6 or 8 months later, it still had carbination which I did not like.

I'm thinking of making this one again, since so many liked it, but leaving it one month like I did with the others, and then bottling.

When I make beer, which ferments much harder, I leave it 2 weeks and then bottle. Even then when you bottle you have to add sugar so it will carbonate.
Sounds like it needed degassing. Can whip it for 5 minutes with a wire whip.

http://factorydirectcraft.com/catalo...FeuPPAodjTEA3A

Some use wooden spoons, others attatch them to cordless drills and it's always done after secondary fermentation and before bottling.

I myself tend to like a good fizzy wine for certain things. Romantic evenings a good fizzy wine with a rich dessert. Just can't top it.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-24-2013, 01:29 AM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Nebraska
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,162
Default

Quote:
Sounds like it needed degassing. Can whip it for 5 minutes with a wire whip.
My other wines I'd left a month and had no problems, so that's what I'd probably do again. I'm really not into making wine since I don't drink much of it.

I'd rather spend my time making beer. Usually I keep it simple, but every once in a while I like to experiment. A couple years ago using a nut brown ale mix I made some bacon beer. Half way through the fermentation I added some fried bacon. The beer had a nice salty smoky flavor.
__________________
Gun control: It's like fighting drunk driving by restricting the sober drivers.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-24-2013, 02:39 AM
Grendal's Avatar
Grendal Male Grendal is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: East Greenwich, Rhode Island, United States
Posts: 1,420
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post
My other wines I'd left a month and had no problems, so that's what I'd probably do again. I'm really not into making wine since I don't drink much of it.

I'd rather spend my time making beer. Usually I keep it simple, but every once in a while I like to experiment. A couple years ago using a nut brown ale mix I made some bacon beer. Half way through the fermentation I added some fried bacon. The beer had a nice salty smoky flavor.
Musta been awesome when mixed with some eggs instead of milk!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-24-2013, 01:38 PM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 118
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post
I usually make beer, but have made wine.

I ferment in 5 or 6.5 gallon plastic buckets. Wine was interesting the first time because it doesn't ferment nearly as hard as beer. I was used to an airlock bubbling all the time, but with wine it's wasn't nearly as hard.

My first wine was made with a kit, and I left it a month before bottling. I've also made wine with concentrated white grape juice, 100% cranberry juice, and sugar. This I also left 1 month before bottling.

I saw a recipe on a forum using strawberries and sugar. This said to leave it in 3 days, bottle and burp the bottles for the next 10 days. This wine turned out very nice, at least a lot of my relatives liked it. But when you popped a bottle 6 or 8 months later, it still had carbination which I did not like.

I'm thinking of making this one again, since so many liked it, but leaving it one month like I did with the others, and then bottling.

When I make beer, which ferments much harder, I leave it 2 weeks and then bottle. Even then when you bottle you have to add sugar so it will carbonate.


Hunter Im seeing the same thing, my wine is almost carbonated, we cracked open a jar to test it this weekend, and its not bad. Its definitely powerful stuff, it has the taste of a dry wine, a little bitter, a little yeasty, but definitely drinkable, and Im sure it will get better with age (if the bottles dont explode) all in all it was a fun experiment I will definitely try again. Id like to try beer someday as well.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-24-2013, 04:14 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Nebraska
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,162
Default

I like making beer rather then wine, but then I like drinking beer more then wine. The nice thing with beer you can drink it sooner, though it also gets better with age.

A month ago I made a 5 gallon batch of beer. Two weeks ago I bottled it, and made a second 5 gallon batch. Today I should bottle the second batch, and I can also put some of the first batch in the fridge to cold condition. Two weeks of cold conditioning and I should be able to pop to the top on a bottle.
__________________
Gun control: It's like fighting drunk driving by restricting the sober drivers.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -2. The time now is 11:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.