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Education/Homeschool Homeschooling, adult education, teaching self-reliance, and anything else education-related.

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Old 02-08-2013, 12:36 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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Default decided to homeschool

I have decided to homeschool after this school year ends in order for my daughter to learn the things she needs. She needs math skills and reading skills so that will be the first thing we work on to get her where she needs to be. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 02-08-2013, 01:23 PM
Cil Female Cil is offline
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Cool! No more stupid papers from the teacher.
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Old 02-08-2013, 03:51 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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WTG!! How old/what grade?
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Old 02-08-2013, 05:41 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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She's ten and in fourth grade, but with her being so far behind we may have to start back earlier this summer and in the fall with teaching her math, spelling, and reading.
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Old 02-08-2013, 06:25 PM
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She's ten and in fourth grade, but with her being so far behind we may have to start back earlier this summer and in the fall with teaching her math, spelling, and reading.
Thanks
First of all, the sooner you can break free of this age/grade level claptrap the better it will be for her and you. Schools cram kids into boxes because it's easier to manage them that way. We all learn at different rates and we all have different learning styles. For example: We didn't even begin teaching one of our sons to read till he was about 9. By the time he was 12 he was reading Greek classics, devouring encyclopedias and began writing prolifically.

RE: Curriculum -- In our particular case (6 out of 8 youngsters I think) we had good results with Saxon math. Reading took care of spelling pretty well. But that's us. Your story will probably be different.

Everybody's results will vary so enjoy the freedom!

Here's an interesting piece about John Q. Adams
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Old 02-08-2013, 06:29 PM
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I used online virtual academy with my children. I enjoyed it.
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Old 02-09-2013, 01:22 AM
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First of all, good for you. Despite what the government tells you, you can do it and do it well--you're the parent after all and you know best.

We started hs two years ago, one ds was going into 6th and the other 3rd. These are two very popular and highly social kids. Our youngest had been tested highly smart-- but couldn't read or do math well so they put him in tiers (we used to call it special ed). That didn't help at all. Two years later (4th grd) he reads at a 7th grade level now and is a full year ahead in math. He didn't want to leave his friends and now he says, "Public school wouldn't be so bad if you could just get your work done, then work on what you want to work on. I'm never going back." The oldest one loves the freedom to work hard during the day on his studies and focus on music and 'inventing' in the evening.

My advice is pray if you are a prayerful person then read Cathy Duffy's book "101 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum". It educated me on what kind of learners my kids are, what style of teacher I am and what is available to match our styles.

The first year is quite a ride. There will be ups and downs, finding your feet, learning what YOU want your kids to know and the kids coming into the knowledge--mom isn't as stupid as they thought. Don't get discouraged, take a 'mental health day' as my hubby calls them dust yourself off and get back on the horse.

Here's a run down of what we do History--Mystery of History, Math--through 6th grade Horizons and then Math-u-See, Spelling--Spelling Power, English--Easy Grammar and Wordsmith, Science--Apologia, and no TV/internet until after 5pm. Video games can only be played Friday evening and Saturday if we aren't busy doing somthing else.

Our family has never been tighter. I hope you find it a blessing as well.
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Old 02-09-2013, 10:53 AM
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Thank you for all the good advice. Hopefull by the end of summer we have all the supplies and curriculum ready to begin homschool.
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:59 PM
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MotherCharlotte MotherCharlotte is offline
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Good for you! I agree with Randall that you should not worry too much about grade levels and what your child "should" be doing each year according to the school system. Let her learn at her own pace, which is one of the beauties of homeschooling.

It drives me nuts that people are always asking me what grades my kids are in - they can't imagine at all that homeschooling isn't all about passing through the grades, just like public school. Homeschooling is so much more than that - it's educating the whole person, it's a family affair, helping the young ones grow up into complete and knowledgeable adults.

As for what materials to use, I would buy a good quality math program, some kind of English grammar curriculum, a science program if you want (but not necessary - with my 8 year old we just do fun experiments and then talk about them) - and then for literature and history just read a lot of good books. I take a lot of the suggestions from Amblesideonline.com - they have lists of books (roughly by age, but it's subjective) that are the best of English literature. I've found some real gems in there I hadn't heard of, and a lot of them are old enough you can get them online for free.

My view is, if the child can become a great reader, then they can easily teach themselves anything they need to know in the future. Reading and good books are the core of our homeschool.

But, take your time to read, poke around the Internet, and develop your own plan and your own philosophy. There's no rush to do anything. Take it slow and you'll be sure to have a good time.
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Old 02-09-2013, 08:21 PM
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Default I'm so jealous

Was homeschooling our DS (10) until this year when DH caved to pressure from his dad and we started public school. I HATE it, miss homeschooling and wish we could go back. Randall is right on ... they wanted to put our son in 5th grade because he is TALL.
As to curriculum, we used Abeka. DD found Saxon math a little dry. She finished 'high school' when she was 16 and is now in nursing school at 19.
DS learned more math by figuring out the weight of a boulder required to breach the walls of a castle than by doing times tables. Like I said, I miss it and hope to go back at the end of this (wasted) year
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:24 AM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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We homeschooled 3 through high school. I agree about the grade level, don't worry about it. We used Math-It with great success. I don't know if it's even still available. It was developed by Dr. Raymond Moore who is now dead. It teaches the basics addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, percentages in a way that helps the child understand the concepts & relationships, not just memorize the rules. Later we used Saxon and the kids liked that. We also used another one but I can't remember the name of it.

The Moore's also recommended a Grammar kit that we liked but I'm not sure of the name of it. I'll see if the kids remember.

I wrote my own curricula based on the state standards of learning rather than using a particular program. We tried several "programs" but the kids hated all of them. There was so much busy work that we never had time to explore and learn! When we finally dumped thema ll and started doing our own thing, the learning started in earnest.

We always tried to integrate real life into the academics. That was a big problem with my education in public school. I learned to do fractions, for example, but didn't learn what to do with them until adulthood.
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:30 AM
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Thank you for homeschooling your daughter, It may be what saves this country. Your daughter will be more mature for her age and be able to be polite and talk to adults. When she gets old enough to meet the world head on, she will be able to make better decisions and be able to think independent of others.
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:12 PM
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Is four days a week to little time to homeschool? I would like to use Friday and Saturday to teach her homemaking skills, plus I still have to teach her Sunday School lessons and Bible study at home for our church doesn't offer it for kids.
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:32 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanb View Post
Is four days a week to little time to homeschool? I would like to use Friday and Saturday to teach her homemaking skills, plus I still have to teach her Sunday School lessons and Bible study at home for our church doesn't offer it for kids.
Thanks
I think that would be a fantastic schedule. It takes less time to learn more at home because much of a teacher's day is spent giving instructions and re-giving instructions for those who weren't paying attention the first time, etc. And you don't have to have school 6 hours a day. 1-3 hours is plenty for younger kids and an efficient high-schooler can be finished by lunch time if they start early. In any case, don't stress out about it if it takes longer. The beauty of home-schooling is that you make it work for you and your children. Homemaking skills are a very important part of education and you can integrate the academics into homemaking and kill two birds with one stone. Bible study is important too.
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:37 PM
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Four well-planned days will do it. There is a ton of wasted time in public school.

Since our kids have friends in public school, we set our schudule up to match theirs, so the kids are off when their friends are. ie...a lot of Fridays off. So we leave Fridays to tie up loose ends, mapwork, timelines, music, art, reading comp tests, math games on computer to enhance the weeks lessons and other learning games, fieldtrips, volunteer work and any other unfinished projects and science experiments.

It's also help mom shop/cook evening, where kids must plan a meal and buy within a budget. It's fun to hear 'that's a crazy price, no wonder you don't buy it.' Ha.

There are a million right ways to homeschool, built it to fit your life.
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Old 02-20-2013, 10:09 AM
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What would be a rough estimate on how much the cost for the first year of homeschooling in getting the room set up with supplies needed for teaching math and reading?
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Old 02-20-2013, 10:40 AM
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I have two kids 10 and 13 and budget $500 for the year, however, I never spend that much.

I buy workbooks new (if I have to), pass on the expensive journals for science and history and use new notebooks and 3-ring binders from thrift shops, and buy everything else used here http://homeschoolclassifieds.com/ .

Last year for both boys I spent less than $300. Here's how it broke down: $85 in math, $20 for history, $25 on science and $75 on lab, we use the library for books/reading, $20 for spelling power (K-12), $37 for english.

My advice: know what you want before you shop, it can be overwhelming and it's easy to over-buy your first year. There is a ton of free websites to use also.

I have a friend with four younger kids who does all four for less than $100. And her kids score off the charts compared to the public school kids.
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:57 PM
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re: 4 day schedule
Education never stops. You might try to spend only 4 days a week on it but what you'll find is that nearly every waking moment is an opportunity.

I'll repeat myself: DO NOT fall into the trap of trying to educate the way the government education system does it. You are free to educate in the way that works best for you and your family.

If you haven't already, you'll come to the point where you recognize the gravity of our responsibility as parents. As you achieve that epiphany, you'll find it becomes practically impossible not to "school" nearly all the time. Don't force it. It will come.

Also keep in mind that, as much as I love and appreciate many of our institutional educators they're primary role is to cover curriculum, not to truly educate. That's why they force youngsters into boxes, molds and schedules.

Enjoy your freedom.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:49 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Quote:
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What would be a rough estimate on how much the cost for the first year of homeschooling in getting the room set up with supplies needed for teaching math and reading?
Thanks
Jean, you could look into homeschooling groups in your area. Some church pastors have that info, or you can look online, in Facebook, or put a short ad in the classifieds as a last resort. We homeschooled 5 children for 26 years; our #6 wanted to play high school football, so we allowed him to go "public" in 9th grade. Our first 4 are through college and married, #5 will graduate college in May this year. I agree with what has been said above, but I would advise you to get in touch with folks in your area who are doing it. You can buy/borrow books and supplies they have found useful, you can plan activities with people of like mindset, and the children can have peers so they know they are not the only ones that are schooling at home. It is also possible to hire teachers or other professionals to teach group classes in subjects that you are not comfortable addressing--usually the sciences and math--that would not be affordable for an individual, and you get to supervise what is being taught. There are also homeschool sports teams (not football), bands, chorus, etc. that can be set up with groups. Homeschooling doesn't have to be "alone" schooling.

The freedom you have with homeschooling is great, and don't think you have to comply with the way public schools do things. Regs vary with the state, but HSDLA http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp
can fill you in on what is required in your location. HSLDA was the primary driving force in making homeschooling leagal, and still has lots of good stuff to say on the matter. PM me if you think I can advise further.
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Old 02-20-2013, 07:16 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randallhilton View Post
re: 4 day schedule
Education never stops. You might try to spend only 4 days a week on it but what you'll find is that nearly every waking moment is an opportunity.

I'll repeat myself: DO NOT fall into the trap of trying to educate the way the government education system does it. You are free to educate in the way that works best for you and your family.

If you haven't already, you'll come to the point where you recognize the gravity of our responsibility as parents. As you achieve that epiphany, you'll find it becomes practically impossible not to "school" nearly all the time. Don't force it. It will come.

Also keep in mind that, as much as I love and appreciate many of our institutional educators they're primary role is to cover curriculum, not to truly educate. That's why they force youngsters into boxes, molds and schedules.

Enjoy your freedom.
I agree!! Don't think of "school" being a certain time. Teaching moments occur all day long. I think there must be some structured math and reading time to begin with when a child is first learning but once he/she can read a whole world opens up.
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