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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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  #1  
Old 02-26-2013, 04:35 AM
Jarhead Male Jarhead is offline
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Default Newbi wood stove questions 6 ft Wood Stove 6" pipe

I got about 6 ft of 6" triple walled stove pipe for the top, but is it possible to mix and match more pieces of 6" pipe to this? I don't have the stove yet either, It was a great price so I did a bit of a gamble. Its for a smallish shed.
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:53 AM
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I assume you're running into a chimney or are you running pipe out the roof???

If you're running into a chimney, you can get by with regular old stove pipe running into that chimney as long as you maintain proper distances between combustible walls and ceilings. In order that we can have our cookstove closer to the wall and not have to have it taking up so much space in our kitchen, I took a four by eight sheet of cement board. I attached it to the wall behind the stove by predrilling holes around the outside edge of the cement board. I then attached it with screws but I ran the screws through porcelain electric fence insulators to maintain about a two inch airspace between the cement board and the wall. We then covered the cement board with four inch ceramic tiles. We have about six inches of clearance between the stove pipe coming up out of the back of the stove and the ceramic covered cement board. It never gets too hot as the ceramic reflects the heat and that dead airspace behind the board is great insulation. The cement board ends about four inches below the ceiling and I have about the same distance off the floor to allow air to circulate freely behind it.

With some of those heavy duty sticky hooks attached to the ceramic side, you can hang up your poker, ash scoop, pot holders, etc.. It's also easy to wipe down and keep clean. We even found some cheap tile transfers that we were able to decorate the tiles with a pattern and make them look a little fancy instead of plain jane solid color.
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:42 PM
Jarhead Male Jarhead is offline
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The pipe goes out the roof. I mean, is it possible to find pipe to fit this 3 walled pipe? The Ceramic Tile deal sounds good, how about that Travertine you see at Home Depo? Think that would have the same reflective quality?
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Jarhead View Post
The pipe goes out the roof. I mean, is it possible to find pipe to fit this 3 walled pipe? The Ceramic Tile deal sounds good, how about that Travertine you see at Home Depo? Think that would have the same reflective quality?
I used that three walled pipe to go through a wall in another application. We had a garage we never parked the car in so we insulated it and converted it to living space. I build a cement block chimney up the outside of the garage but connected it with a triple wall pipe through the wall into the chimney so I can use a wood stove to heat that room, but there was a connector adaptor kit I used to run my six inch pipe into the triple pipe.

I think that Travertine should work fine. I used z-brick the same way as I used the tile for a stove we had in another house before we bought this farm.
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:13 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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The pipe goes out the roof. I mean, is it possible to find pipe to fit this 3 walled pipe? The Ceramic Tile deal sounds good, how about that Travertine you see at Home Depo? Think that would have the same reflective quality?
JH, I think I know what you are talking about. You want a connector for linking stove pipe to your chimney pipe, is that correct?

That's what I did for my woodstove installations. I used double-walled "Dura-Plus" brand stove pipe for the first 6 feet coming out of the stove. I used this connector http://www.northlineexpress.com/chim...trim-8675.htmlto link the stove pipe to the triple-wall chimney pipe that passed through the second floor and the roof.

In designing your stove exhaust keep these numbers in mind. Single wall stove pipe is cheapest, but you must keep the pipe at least 18 inches away from anything combustable. Double-wall stove pipe has a 6 inch minimum clearance. Triple-wall chimney pipe needs only 2" from anything combustable. If you pass the stove's exhaust through the second floor like I did, you must use triple-wall from that point up all the way to the cap. If you have a cathedral ceiling that exits straight to the roof, that would be the cheapest installation because you'd use a minumum of triple-wall pipe.

Hope that was informative.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:46 AM
Plowpoint Male Plowpoint is offline
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You do not need an adapter to make the connection, though they do make them, they are just expensive. Single wall pipe fits within triple wall, which is what I have on my chimney going up through my roof.

I did not secure mine with rivets or screws and it has lasted years and several chimney fires without coming apart, but when my father did the same thing, he drove long sheetrock screws into the flanges of the triple wall pipe to help secure the single wall pipe to it. The problem is, where the single wall pipe slips up through the triple wall, there is a double flange there making adding screws impossible, but long sheetrock screws make the connection by going through both flanges, and because sheetrock screws are hardened steel, they can penetrate sheet steel.
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:15 AM
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.
Tis right, you don't need the adapter. But I would highly recommend connecting your stovepipe by inserting at least one sheet metal screw at every connection. If you've ever had a stove pipe come apart while the stove was fired, then you'd know the reason why they recommend putting it together with screws.

Back in the last century when Mrs. and I were first married, we had an old Heaterola heating stove. It was built for coal but we were too poor to buy coal so we cut the wood into short enough chunks to burn in the old pot belly.

Well, I'll not forget the morning Mrs. got up early and decided to fire the stove up and have things toasty when I came in. She took a hod of corncobs and tossed them in the stove. They smothered the hot coals that were in the bottom of the stove. Cobs are like coal and will give off an explosive gas when they get hot. Suddenly, the stove ignited with a BOOM! Well, the concussion blew the stove pipe right out of the chimney flue and blew the pieces of "tight fitting" pipe apart. Soot and ashes were all over the place, not to mention the fact the pipe was too warm to handle and now the old potbelly heaterola was chugging along burning up the cobs at a phenomenal rate while the stove belched smoke filling the house.

Mrs. came out the back door hollering for me to come to the house. We had to open all the windows and then I had to crawl on hands and knees through the thickening smoke to find the stove pipes and with mittened hand attempt to get them all back together and attached to the burning stove and get the other end stuffed in the flue.

Needless to say, I have bought self tapping sheet metal screws and put a screw or two at every single union of my stove pipes ever since.
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Old 03-06-2013, 12:18 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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Originally Posted by Plowpoint View Post
You do not need an adapter to make the connection, though they do make them, they are just expensive. Single wall pipe fits within triple wall, which is what I have on my chimney going up through my roof.
One thing the connector does besides linking the two dis-similar tubes together is that the adapter also supports the weight of the chimney pipe at the support box on the ceiling. In my installations (kitchen and living rooms), I passed the chimney pipes through the second floor, then out the second floor roof, so the whole assembly was quite heavy. In using the adapter, I anchored the chimney rigidly in place at the second floor, rather than letting the full weight rest directly on the stove exhaust. I suspect that a midpoint anchor also helps prevent excessive vibration caused by high winds.

I followed the installation instructions to the letter for my two stoves. I don't know for sure, but if the instructions say to use the adapter, then it's absence may be a code violation. In my instructions, it states it's use is required. http://www.northlineexpress.com/chim...-8674.htmlMost It's likely an inspector might never even know, but it gives me peace of mind to know that I did the best installation I could.

I did link the pipe sections together with screws anyway, also for peace of mind. I also had trouble punching though the relatively hard metal of the pipes, but found that stainless steel screws were hard enough to go through.
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Last edited by MichaelK; 03-06-2013 at 01:04 PM.
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelK View Post
One thing the connector does besides linking the two dis-similar tubes together is that the adapter also supports the weight of the chimney pipe at the support box on the ceiling. In my installations (kitchen and living rooms), I passed the chimney pipes through the second floor, then out the second floor roof, so the whole assembly was quite heavy. In using the adapter, I anchored the chimney rigidly in place at the second floor, rather than letting the full weight rest directly on the stove exhaust. I suspect that a midpoint anchor also helps prevent excessive vibration caused by high winds.

I followed the installation instructions to the letter for my two stoves. I don't know for sure, but if the instructions say to use the adapter, then it's absence may be a code violation. In my instructions, it states it's use is required. http://www.northlineexpress.com/chim...-8674.htmlMost It's likely an inspector might never even know, but it gives me peace of mind to know that I did the best installation I could.

I did link the pipe sections together with screws anyway, also for peace of mind. I also had trouble punching though the relatively hard metal of the pipes, but found that stainless steel screws were hard enough to go through.
Smart,

If you are going to err, err on the side of caution. It's better to be safe than sorry. Lots of ins. companies don't like wood heat and so if you have it you better have everything done up right.

We have a cost sharing pool and not actual ins. but they even frown on wood heat but will not forbid it as long as everything is up to snuff. We have a brick chimney with a stainless steel liner. All my stove pipes are screwed together and I have made sure to have proper distances from any combustibles. I don't really want my house to burn down. Or is it burn up?
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Old 03-09-2013, 06:46 AM
Plowpoint Male Plowpoint is offline
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You make some valid points, and I concur, always err on the cautious side.

In my case, I only had 6 feet of triple wall sticking through the roof because I have a Ranch Style house, and my location going through the ceiling/roof was near an outside wall. This means my ceiling to roof length is only about a foot, and on this hill, I get plenty of draft, so compared to a two story installation, it was not a lot of triple wall.

I did use one of those adjustable brackets that adjust to your roof pitch, so I don't have any weight on my stove connection. With the single wall pipe jammed upward from my pot bellied stove connection, and the triple wall pipe secured at the roof, my chimney would not move in an earthquake. But that is the problem with this kind of thing; and individual installation is going to depend on varying factors. Like here, I do not having any building codes to contend with, and being a commercial farm, I do not have to deal with homeowners insurance.

I will say though that I was under the impression that this thread was about building a safe, inexpensive functional chimney. If money was not an issue, then a person should just build a masonry chimney. They are a lot better then any metal one.

Last edited by Plowpoint; 03-10-2013 at 09:09 AM.
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:26 AM
Plowpoint Male Plowpoint is offline
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Let me expand some thoughts on chimney design...

First off, there is no perfect chimney because what you have underneath them determines what they should be made out of. For instance, with today's gasification wood stoves (which make a lot of condensation but little creosote) you would want a stainless steel triple wall chimney since a lot of water vapor is going to go up it. In this case, the stainless steel will prevent corrosion which will occur in a masonry lined chimney, since the water vapor will permeate the masonry liner, and over time erode it.

But as great as a triple wall stainless chimney is, DO NOT USE one with coal. Coal corrodes stainless steel at an incredible rate, with stainless chimney liners being corroded through in a years time! No joke! If you burn coal, it has to be a masonry lined chimney or you are inviting disaster (carbon monoxide in your home from having no draft).

With a regular wood stove, a lined masonry chimney is best as it will take the brunt of a chimney fire a lot better then a triple walled stainless one will, and inevitably, a wood stove will start a chimney fire at some time.

As for stove pipe orientation, that too depends. With a wood stove, you want the crimped ends to go downward, that way in case their is creosote build up, it will be sealed and run into the stove and not leak out. However, in a coal only situation, you want the crimped ends to be upwards, to allow for a better seal since you can never have creosote with coal, but draft is critical with coal.

Whatever you decide to do, the chimney interior MUST BE ROUND. Smoke travels in a spiral as it rises and square or rectangular chimneys mean less draft!
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:07 AM
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Let me expand some thoughts on chimney design...

First off, there is no perfect chimney because what you have underneath them determines what they should be made out of. For instance, with today's gasification wood stoves (which make a lot of condensation but little creosote) you would want a stainless steel triple wall chimney since a lot of water vapor is going to go up it. In this case, the stainless steel will prevent corrosion which will occur in a masonry lined chimney, since the water vapor will permeate the masonry liner, and over time erode it.

But as great as a triple wall stainless chimney is, DO NOT USE one with coal. Coal corrodes stainless steel at an incredible rate, with stainless chimney liners being corroded through in a years time! No joke! If you burn coal, it has to be a masonry lined chimney or you are inviting disaster (carbon monoxide in your home from having no draft).

With a regular wood stove, a lined masonry chimney is best as it will take the brunt of a chimney fire a lot better then a triple walled stainless one will, and inevitably, a wood stove will start a chimney fire at some time.

As for stove pipe orientation, that too depends. With a wood stove, you want the crimped ends to go downward, that way in case their is creosote build up, it will be sealed and run into the stove and not leak out. However, in a coal only situation, you want the crimped ends to be upwards, to allow for a better seal since you can never have creosote with coal, but draft is critical with coal.

Whatever you decide to do, the chimney interior MUST BE ROUND. Smoke travels in a spiral as it rises and square or rectangular chimneys mean less draft!
I agree with the round, and a tile lined chimney is no doubt the best. I didn't know that about the coal and the stainless. We've not experienced that, but then, we are burning low grade coal so maybe that's the reason, and I burn little coal, mostly wood.

However, our chimney is square. When we bought the house they had been running propane in a brick chimney. That is a NO NO. The propane gas fumes eat the mortar right out of the bricks. So, what do you do when you buy an old house with a poor chimney that goes right through the center of the house. Major undertaking to take it down and rebuild it, it's 26 feet in length from top to bottom, so we measured and then made a stainless steel sleeve that was 3/4 inch smaller than the chimney to allow for imperfections, and slid it down inside the chimney. It was made in two sections which we screwed together. Fortunately that was twenty some years ago and stainless was still cheap.

The advantage has been, it has never needed cleaning. Nothing has stuck to it in all these years. We have plenty of draft, (even though it's square, beggers can't be choosers). With an interior chimney, it's warm so you don't have to establish a draft flow like with an outside chimney and we get a lot of nice heat off that chimney to heat the house.

Speaking of, I need to go put in some wood in the furnace and then go outside and unload the load of wood on my truck so I can get to work.
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