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Old 05-14-2013, 04:22 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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Default first sewing project

My daughter had a denim skirt that had gotten to short for her to wear, but it still fit in the waist so I found some really pretty white eyelet fabric at Walmart. I gathered it before attaching and sewing it to the inside of the skirt and did the hem with the sewing machine to where you just barely can see the hem, don't ask me how, for I will most likely will never be able to do anther hem like that again.

A few days ago my daughter wore the skirt and her cowboy boots to school, she came home and told me her teacher wanted to know where she could buy a skirt like that for her daughter, when she told them her mom made it and how it was done they wanted to know if I would take their skirts and do the same for they could wear the skirts with their boots. I would be so afraid I would ruin their skirts and have all their moms mad at me and make me replace the skirts, so I told my daughter I don't sew well enough to do that.

I think the skirt looks nice and came out ok for my first try, but what means more to me is that I took something and made something more out of it instead of getting rid of it.

For my next project I would like to try and make matching curtins and tablecloth for my kitchen, if the fabric isn't too expensive. I like the old time red gingham fabric, but haven't seen any at the Walmart store.
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 05-14-2013, 09:53 PM
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MollyPitcher Female MollyPitcher is offline
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Back in the early 80's skirts with eyelet or lace (usually eyelet) at the bottom were very popular. I had a few. The idea at the time was that it was sort of like a petticoat showing. Very pretty.

Glad it turned out so well. I bet the other girl's mothers will be doing the same for their daughters.

Do you ever check thrift stores for fabric? Every now and then you come across something useful.
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Old 05-14-2013, 11:37 PM
CLee CLee is offline
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Congrats on doing such a great job!!! Give yourself a well deserved pat on the back!
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:34 AM
bentonbee bentonbee is offline
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What a great idea!

Are you familiar with "Pinterest"? It's a wonderful place to find ideas for sewing project and other things...........many of the ideas are easy, low cost and very practical. Lots of 're-purposing' projects.

Sew on!!!!
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Old 05-15-2013, 02:45 PM
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Nice---Congrats.

Adapt and overcome huh?
You may have started a new fad!!!
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  #6  
Old 05-18-2013, 05:01 PM
crackergirl Female crackergirl is offline
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Jean B., you might reconsider doing the other girls' skirts. You learn a lot from doing and even if they aren't exactly the same as your daughter's that is a big part of the fun of sewing... each one is unique (custom, if you will)
And the other families likely will NOT get around to doing them, so what do they have to lose?
I sewed for the public for years and had a fortune-cookie fortune pinned on my workspace bulletin board. It read "Trust yourself. You know more than you think you do"
Also, ditto on shopping for fabric at the thrifts. A lot of stuff from elderly ladies winds up there because no one sews much anymore.
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Old 05-18-2013, 08:38 PM
mo4pintn mo4pintn is offline
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Congratulations JeanB!!!! It feels good to do something your didn't think you could. I am also willing to try and do things for my family but don't always have the confidence to do it for others. You can do it. Hope you find your material to make your curtains and tablecoth. Good fabric hunting.
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Old 08-06-2013, 12:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanb View Post
My daughter had a denim skirt that had gotten to short for her to wear, but it still fit in the waist so I found some really pretty white eyelet fabric at Walmart. I gathered it before attaching and sewing it to the inside of the skirt and did the hem with the sewing machine to where you just barely can see the hem, don't ask me how, for I will most likely will never be able to do anther hem like that again.

A few days ago my daughter wore the skirt and her cowboy boots to school, she came home and told me her teacher wanted to know where she could buy a skirt like that for her daughter, when she told them her mom made it and how it was done they wanted to know if I would take their skirts and do the same for they could wear the skirts with their boots. I would be so afraid I would ruin their skirts and have all their moms mad at me and make me replace the skirts, so I told my daughter I don't sew well enough to do that.

I think the skirt looks nice and came out ok for my first try, but what means more to me is that I took something and made something more out of it instead of getting rid of it.

For my next project I would like to try and make matching curtins and tablecloth for my kitchen, if the fabric isn't too expensive. I like the old time red gingham fabric, but haven't seen any at the Walmart store.
Thanks


jeanb, check this out: http://www.blair.com/e/samantha-kitc...nates/3800.uts
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  #9  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:03 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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Thanks Dayzee.
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  #10  
Old 01-23-2015, 01:14 AM
iamgrammy iamgrammy is offline
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I'd like to hear what you'd call the most pleasant sort of hand sewing projects for the beginner. I love stitching, but not embroidery. Need something portable for trips. Very calming for me. If I tried applique, should I use a hoop? Thanks.
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Old 01-27-2015, 01:56 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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iamgrammy -
Do you also have a machine? If so, there's a really neat way to get appliques ready to hand stitch down. Use a used drier fabric softener sheet and sew it onto the right side of the fabric in the shape of your applique. Cut a slash in the middle of the drier sheet and turn it right side out. This puts the seams inside - and you press it flat and work points out with a pin as needed to make the shape nice and sharp. Now, when you sew it down, use blind stitch and you don't have to worry about frayed edges slipping out. The drier sheet doesn't add bulk because it's so thin and it's free, since you've already used it.

My mom used to make wall-hanging quilts this way - and she did some lovely scenic wall hangings. She also did baby quilts using simple coloring book pictures for the patterns; each little animal to a square and they were so cute! She did a lot of hand sewing after they retired & traveled in a RV where there wasn't room for a sewing machine.
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Old 01-27-2015, 02:01 PM
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JeanB -
If you can, try different Walmarts. There's a huge difference in how much fabric they carry from one store to another. I'll drive 12 miles or so extra to get to a smaller town (more people sew there, I guess) - than here in Madison where there's not much sewing going on. And when I visit Arkansas! WOW! - they have huge piles of dollar a yard fabric sometimes, although the quality can vary a lot. Then the problem is stopping yourself from buying something that's pretty, but that you don't have a use for. (SOME day I'm going to figure out what to do with all that "on sale" stuff in the back of my closet!)
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Old 01-27-2015, 07:02 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanb View Post
My daughter had a denim skirt that had gotten to short for her to wear, but it still fit in the waist so I found some really pretty white eyelet fabric at Walmart. I gathered it before attaching and sewing it to the inside of the skirt and did the hem with the sewing machine to where you just barely can see the hem, don't ask me how, for I will most likely will never be able to do anther hem like that again.

A few days ago my daughter wore the skirt and her cowboy boots to school, she came home and told me her teacher wanted to know where she could buy a skirt like that for her daughter, when she told them her mom made it and how it was done they wanted to know if I would take their skirts and do the same for they could wear the skirts with their boots. I would be so afraid I would ruin their skirts and have all their moms mad at me and make me replace the skirts, so I told my daughter I don't sew well enough to do that.

I think the skirt looks nice and came out ok for my first try, but what means more to me is that I took something and made something more out of it instead of getting rid of it.

For my next project I would like to try and make matching curtins and tablecloth for my kitchen, if the fabric isn't too expensive. I like the old time red gingham fabric, but haven't seen any at the Walmart store.
Thanks

You should post a picture of it for us. Ya done good mom.

Here are tons of ideas along the line of what you did.
https://www.etsy.com/search?q=cowgir...Cowgirl&page=1
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  #14  
Old 01-28-2015, 12:07 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Iamgrammy,

I used to go to monthly quilting meetings to learn to quilt and one of them used to piece/quilt every one of her quilts totally by hand. She could whip out a queen-sized quilt every month. You'd have to look closely to try and determine whether it was machine or hand-sewn. She also did a lot of applique and other embellishments on her quilts.

I can't think of something portable except for quilt blocks; I learned to sew (the basics) when I was a kid, making Barbie doll clothes (could take those places and work on them).

One thing I've noticed, is that there are books out now (Amazon) that offer "small projects" for the house, like oven mitts, scissor covers, pincushions, needle keepers, etc., that you might like.
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  #15  
Old 02-01-2015, 01:37 AM
crackergirl Female crackergirl is offline
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Default If you wanted to quilt

You could do a crazy quilt, because you make the block, then embellish it -- by hand if you wish -- and you could do that in the car, stitching, embroidering, etc.
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