BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum

Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser


Go Back   BHM Forum > Self-Reliance & Preparedness > Hands-on > Hands-On How-To

Hands-On How-To This board is ONLY for detailed, instructional posts about how to do or make something. General conversation about a topic belongs in the appropriate board.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-01-2013, 02:12 PM
CarolAnn's Avatar
CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 4,888
Default Need fix-it idea for porch swing

Five or six years ago, I bought a two-seater swing at Walmart. It had cloth cushion seats and a cloth canopy that both sun rotted after a couple of years. I found replacements, but they cost more than the original swing, which was only $79.00. Since then, I've seen several frames like mine on the curb - waiting for trash pickup, so I know this is a common problem.

I thought I was pretty smart to buy rope and weave it in over the frame so I could put cushions on it - but the rope also sun rotted after a couple of years. What a surprise it was to get the cushions out after winter storage and have them fall right through the rope webbing! (It could have been ME that fell through, so that wasn't so bad as it could have been!)

I know lawn chair webbing will rot also, but there must be SOMETHING that will hold the cushions and not rot. But what?

I'm kind of leaning toward hardware cloth, maybe doubled, but how to hook it on? I've looked at trampoline springs, but that would take a LOT of drilling in the steel frame and maybe weaken it. Or would it? Would galvanized wire work? Or . . . .?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-01-2013, 03:21 PM
MollyPitcher's Avatar
MollyPitcher Female MollyPitcher is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Between DFW and the Red River
Posts: 1,602
Default

Don't know about a long term solution, but I got a few straps from a friend whose hubby is a truck driver. They are a thick nylon, about 4" wide and the rolls are very long--long enough to go over a load on a flatbed trailer and strap it down, maybe 30 or 40'? You've seen them on big trucks, no doubt. I used one to weave around the frame of a youth sized daybed I put in my enclosed porch. I put a chaise lounge cushion on it and it's pretty comfortable but still firm enough I don't sag it down when I sit. I wove it pretty tight.

The ones I got were filthy from use so I had to lay them down and scrub them and they still looked dirty even though they got washed, but I figured for the underside of something it wouldn't matter anyway.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-02-2013, 06:30 PM
askew askew is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 100
Default

Those nylon binders MollyPitcher speaks of are great. Another option are those ratcheting nylon load straps commonly used on pickup trucks and such. I have seen many of these flung down in disgust as the operator is too impatient to deal with them. Cut the mechanism off and you have some lighter weight version of the big ones. Also, the newer version of baler twine used for the huge square or round bales is extremely durable.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-03-2013, 02:50 PM
CarolAnn's Avatar
CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 4,888
Default

Wow - this is a FANTASTIC idea. I even have some of these & didn't even think of it. Might have to get more, but a trip to Harbor Freight is always fun!
Thanks! This is what I'll do.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-03-2013, 05:51 PM
Quietgentleman's Avatar
Quietgentleman Quietgentleman is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Eastern Iowa
Posts: 1,448
Default

If you want a permanent solution I would use 2 inch wide strips of .020 aluminum and some 1/8 inch pop rivets. You can weave the aluminum like lawn chair webbing. A couple rivets in each end and you can forget sun deterioration.

QGM
__________________
If you can read this YOU NEED TO THANK A TEACHER
If you can read this in English YOU NEED TO THANK A SOLDIER
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-04-2013, 12:03 AM
Catalpa's Avatar
Catalpa Catalpa is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,888
Default

I have the same thing, though I bought mine at Kmart. My solution was to completely remove the remnants of rotted cloth and use 1x pieces of treated wood. I simply cut them to length, laid them across the frame and secured them from underneath with pipe holders. I'll try to take a picture later. Turned out really well, though after a year I need to paint the wood! LOL
__________________
"Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus" Romans 8:1
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-05-2013, 01:08 PM
mohican Male mohican is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11
Default

you might try the plastic "snow Fencing". It shouldn't rot, it might very slowly UV degrade over time but you should be able to make it work. Might take a few layers.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-06-2013, 02:49 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Cleveland OH / Palestine WV
Posts: 1,330
Default

If you have a junkyard nearby, you can probably get seatbelt webbing cheap.

It's strong and durable and generallly withstands sunlight without degrading.

I would fold it over at each end and then fasten it with two or three sheet metal screws with washers.

When I buy large parts (engines, transmissions, rear axles) they have me cut seat belts and make a sling, then they come out with their large forklift and haul the part out and into my truck.

In my experience, minivans often have incredibly long seat belts, which is handy if they charge by the piece.
__________________
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.

Marxism: The ultimate illusory fantasy.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-07-2013, 11:40 AM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 445
Default

Flatten out some pvc pipe and fasten it to the frame. 3/4" spaced at 1-1/2 on center should be enough.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -2. The time now is 09:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.