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  #1  
Old 01-17-2009, 10:54 PM
duckidaho Male duckidaho is offline
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Default what do you need to start reloading

Assuming reloading is cheaper, or at least more fun, what do you need and what does it cost to get started in reloading? Just a few calibers. .44 special, 30-06, 30-30. Maybe get into shotgun shells later. Russ
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  #2  
Old 01-17-2009, 11:41 PM
Bill_in_FL Bill_in_FL is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

Press , dies , powder scale and load book for starters . Then tumbler , case trimmer and powder measure , the more you load for the more you will need . Prices vary with quality . Most of my reloading tools are from the 60's and 70's and still going strong . I prefer to buy used , gunshows , gunbroker.com and ebay have lots of reloading items , if you buy used you get a better price and usually better quality because things aren't made the way they used to be made . Shotgun reloading is a whole different project , you will need a different press for the guage you want to reload for and a load book , then shot and powder bushings for the load you want .

Bill
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Old 01-18-2009, 12:14 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

I tell customes who ask to figure $500.00 depending on what press manufacture they choose;
included in that figure is powder,primers,brass,bullets.

Box of Hornady 257 dia for the 25/06 just cost my partner $25.00. He's a friend, if it would have been a retail sale that box would have been $30.00+ for 100 bullets.



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Old 01-18-2009, 12:37 PM
kawalekm kawalekm is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

HI ID
Couple of weeks ago I spotted a guy selling all his lifelong accumulated reloading tools on www.craigslist.com. You might want to check there to see if anyone in your area is selling equipment. Another option is to go to your local shooting range or gun club and seek out the reloaders there. Most serious reloaders accumulate a serious amount of equipment over the years, trying new and more advanced tools, so they probably have some beginners hardware that they might part with cheap.

Another option is to buy a kit from a company like midway. Here are some kits that I bookmarked for you. Note that Lee is the price leader in this group. They make good dies (which are cheap), while I have to say the rest of their equipment is just cheap (which means low quality). I have purchased some Lee stuff that I used 4-5 times and then threw out and purchased the same thing from another company.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=423081

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=749997

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=140616

Given a choice of these, I think the best for your money is the RCBS master. A RockChucker press is great for sizing large magnum rifle cartridges, and the kit comes with a powder measure and hand primer. That mostly duplicates what I am using myself now.

Note, that with all these kits, you must buy your dies separately. For any pistol cartridge I would recommend you by carbide dies. Lee here makes good carbide dies that I recommend to anyone. I would buy a die set the reloads both 44 special and 44 magnum. That way you have an excuse to buy a bigger pistol later.
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=646599

Lee also makes steel dies for bottlenecked rifle cartridges, but remember that they need to be lubricated before sizing. Here is the Lee set for .30-30.
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=251154

Once you get you kit, the last thing you are going to need is some brass, powder, primers, and bullets. Brass can be saved after shooting, or picked off the ground that other shooters have left. Bullets can be made, or they can be purchased. It's much easier to buy jacketed rifle bullets, so you should pick those up at midway also. Your .44 can shot either cast or jacketed bullets. You can buy powder and primers through the mail, but I never have because the the grossly overpriced hazmat charges. Go to your local sporting shop to buy those. You'll need large pistol primers, and large rifle primers. There are so many choices for powders, which can generate endless debate amongst shooters. Maybe to get yourself started I'd suggest Unique for the .44, and IMR4895 or H4895 for your rifles.

Get started and ask more questions as you go along.
Michael
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Old 01-18-2009, 04:43 PM
duckidaho Male duckidaho is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

thanks a ton, that's good info to know. I browsed midway the other day and said to myself, "gee the Lee stuff is soooo much cheaper, I wonder what's up with that." I hate buying junk and then having to go back and buy the real deal.
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:34 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

I have a small Lee press for decapping and a few other Lee trimmers. I've never had a problem with their equipment.
I own a Lyman press,rcbs & Lyman, Lee dies, moulds, all suit my needs.

bpb
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  #7  
Old 01-19-2009, 09:50 PM
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Watonga_Jim Male Watonga_Jim is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

I got started reloading about 2 years ago using primary Lee equipment. *At that time I had found a dealer that sells Lee stuff online and I got a starter package for about $70. *It included the press, scales, powder measure, priming tool and other small items. *The only thing I added later was a case trimmer. *I found good deals on used die sets for the ammo I wanted to load and someone gave me a couple of reloading manuals. *You can also get loading data free online. *I've now loaded several hundred rounds and the Lee equipment works great. *

Bottom line - I suggest getting started small and cheap and you won't regret it. *Also, read everything you can about reloading and ballistics. *It made me appreciate the science of firearms and added to my shooting enjoyment and in the short (not long) run you will save money and have more options on bullet selection for your guns.

Regards,
Jim

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  #8  
Old 01-21-2009, 11:19 AM
Iwoots Iwoots is offline
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Default Re: what do you need to start reloading

Lot of good responses, but I suggest you ask yourself a question: Am I reloading to get precise accuracy, or because I like shooting a whole lot?

I am in the latter category (& the eyes aren't as good as they used to be), so I use Lee scoops instead of the precision powder measures.
I purchased my Lee reloader in 1989 because I bought a Webley and some 45 auto rims. Still works good; have expanded to 45acp (use moon clips), 30-30, etc. Site is leeprecision.com, w/ links to sellers. Years ago, I walked in their front door & bought for the 30-30; don't know if they still do that. Latest purchase was via the link on the site for factory sales (factorysales.com).

I second Watonga Jim: start small & cheap. That way if you decide its easier to stock up on surplus ammo rather than reloading, you won't be the guy listing stuff on Craigslist for 10 or 20 cents on the dollar.
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  #9  
Old 06-15-2009, 07:20 AM
cmdan cmdan is offline
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Here you go! ;0)

http://www.leeprecision.com/html/cat...leeloader.html

Just get the "correct" powder and primers.

I admit, one of these is the first reloading kit I used...........but then I wanted more....and more.....Single stage RCBS press, dies for all my guns, primers, powders, bullet pullers, books and more books.......... it is addicting so be careful. :O)
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  #10  
Old 05-16-2012, 02:27 AM
willsknife willsknife is offline
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Default Money...

There's time, patience, and money. You don't save any money over factory ammo, BUT you get to shoot lots more.
Other posters here will tell you what you need to get started.
I bought a new press recently. I shopped, and asked for advice on where ant what to buy. I shopped Midway, fsreloading, and Titan reloading.
Fsreloading saved 20% over Titan, $100 over Midway, and about half what leeprecision charges. fsreloading.com
Good Luck and Happy Reloading
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  #11  
Old 05-31-2012, 09:53 AM
JoshF JoshF is offline
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Do not be afraid of Lee equipment. It is not as rugged as some other brands but I cant think of anything that does not work well.
I did upgrade to a digital scale that will weigh my cast bullets and cases.
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Old 05-31-2012, 05:32 PM
gunsmoke Male gunsmoke is offline
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Just some advice from nealy 50 years experience whatever that may be worth.

If you are SERIOUS

Don't try to save money on a press! Buy USED and buy BIG IRON, USED RCBS, LYMAN, BAIR. BONANZA CO-AX really cost no more than a brand new LEE.

SAME THING GOES FOR DIES. LEE and C & H are some of the lower cost new dies and are perfectly good dies, BUT RCBS & REDDING used dies can be found everywhere for 5 - 10 $ more!

The one place where you should save your money and buy the best new you can afford is to get the BEST NEW SCALE YOU CAN AFFORD! As you learn to HANDLOAD You will be glad you did. Consider the value of your scale priceless, I have more than a dozen and use them all from $10 to over $300. Some of them are lab scales made in the 1930s.

You can get started well with a LEE loader in caliber, but if you enjoy the benefits and expanded possibilities beyond what you find on the ammo shelf at WALLY-WORLD you'll get $5-600 invested, and the longer you'll do it the more a faster you'll save money and greatly broaden your shooting experiences.


GOOD LUCK AND HAVE FUN!
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:37 AM
Jazzman Jazzman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willsknife View Post
There's time, patience, and money. You don't save any money over factory ammo, BUT you get to shoot lots more.
Other posters here will tell you what you need to get started.
I bought a new press recently. I shopped, and asked for advice on where ant what to buy. I shopped Midway, fsreloading, and Titan reloading.
Fsreloading saved 20% over Titan, $100 over Midway, and about half what leeprecision charges. fsreloading.com
Good Luck and Happy Reloading

I'd have to disagree on the savings , some of the stuff I load for can't b found on the shelf and some of the other stuff is sky high , and then there's the precision factor. *NO* factory ammunition can achieve the precision of the anal retentive handloader.

For some of the more common cartridges , nope you won't save any money , especially not for plinking ammo. But for example , you'll save one hell of a lot over shelf prices in .375 rum.

And for varminting? Forget most off the shelf ammunition , never mind that the really hot .20s and .22s are wildcats.

And old archaic cartridges that some of us still hold onto like .257 roberts , good luck finding ammunition on the shelf , hell it's hard to just find cases.
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Old 06-17-2012, 12:19 AM
gunsmoke Male gunsmoke is offline
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Went to a gunshow in Jackson MS afew years bacl, this guy had a huge selection of RCBS dies many obsolete, esoteric, case forming and some custom dies that retailed for well over $100/ea. I assumed he had bought them as a lot from a widow since each was marked $5.

He had well over 200 so I offered him $250 for the lot if he'd help me carry them to my truck and load them, he had milk crates an 2 hand trucks so it was a breeze.

I sortyed them when I got them home and sold the ones I had no interest in on ebay. Two of the case forming dies brought $130 each. I made a very handsome profit which I invested in an estate sale, acquiring among many other things 12,000 Remington 405 gr. .458 SPs I have quite a few .45-70s and love loading for all of them.

Its a game, if you get into it, shop, you'll have fun!

I once found several K of .38-40 REM factory brass 50 rds a box on sale at a Cabelas for $4/box
I don't load .38-40 but I traded them for a few K of Win .44 Spec and .30 Carbine new brass in the box. It all seems to work out in the end. All the fun is in getting there.
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Old 08-28-2012, 02:16 AM
sethwyo sethwyo is offline
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can anyone post a link to an Online Reloading manual please ? charts of bullet weights & powder types & charges ?
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Old 08-28-2012, 07:52 AM
Dennis G Male Dennis G is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duckidaho View Post
Assuming reloading is cheaper, or at least more fun, what do you need and what does it cost to get started in reloading? Just a few calibers. .44 special, 30-06, 30-30. Maybe get into shotgun shells later. Russ
I do not reload, just not interested. BUT the topic reminded me of advice given to me by a criminal defense lawyer; do not use anything but the same caliber commercial ammo that your police force uses.

He explained that if you use self-loaded rounds, the prosecutor will imply you loaded KILLER loads.

He wants me to be able to say " I use the same types of bullets as the Norfolk police do. "

So... I have 9 mm and 38 special hollow points for my self defense ammo.

Just something to think about.

Dennis G
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:20 AM
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rdb rdb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sethwyo View Post
can anyone post a link to an Online Reloading manual please ? charts of bullet weights & powder types & charges ?
http://www.imrpowder.com/basic-manual-inquiry.html

Most component manufacturers have online data. I also really like the Lee manual.
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  #18  
Old 01-04-2013, 12:28 PM
Poonie Male Poonie is offline
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I used to reload alot using my dad's old Lyman turret press. When I started my own family I didn't have the chance to go to dad's house (some distance away) easily to load so I wanted my own setup. I didn't have much cash at the time so went minimal and bought a Lee cast iron single stage press and a couple Lee die sets. Bought just the necessary items, scale, measuring spoons, caliper, trickler, manual case trimmer, etc....This is all I've used to this day. I don't load much, only when the mood strikes, and I normally only load for .303 and 7.7 so this works fine for me. If I were to ever get hot and heavy into loading I'd consider upgrading to a turret press and maybe a volumteric powder measure etc. So if I was starting out, I'd go with the bare minimum, so long as you're only loading a box or two at a time like I do. No sense spending hundreds of dollars when you don't have or need to.

I like loading on days when its too crappy outside to do much else. Good way to pass the time and accumulate some ammo for the next good shooting day.
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:13 PM
essayons4791 essayons4791 is offline
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I've had good results from the Lee starter kit, with the O-shaped press. Not fancy, but it works. Get a digital scale, though, the balance type scale is a real pain.

Have a neighbor that reloads using nothing but some antique lee hand loaders that use a hammer somewhere in the process- not an ideal, but it works for him.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:24 PM
gunslinger598 Male gunslinger598 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis G View Post
I do not reload, just not interested. BUT the topic reminded me of advice given to me by a criminal defense lawyer; do not use anything but the same caliber commercial ammo that your police force uses.

He explained that if you use self-loaded rounds, the prosecutor will imply you loaded KILLER loads.

He wants me to be able to say " I use the same types of bullets as the Norfolk police do. "

So... I have 9 mm and 38 special hollow points for my self defense ammo.

Just something to think about.

Dennis G
If I am ever put in the postition to have to shoot someone it's to kill.

Years ago while taking the state required course for self defense to obtain a concealed carry permit one of the questions on the test was: "when is it ok to point a gun at someone?" The answer being when you intend to kill them.
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