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  #1  
Old 06-24-2013, 12:14 AM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Default is this lambs quarters?

might seem a stupid question as lambs quarters is one of the most common wild edibles you can find, but you guys are here to ask so better safe than sorry. Im a total rookie at foraging, and now the weathers good and the plants are out Im learning. So if anyone can give me a positive ID on this, Id appreciate it. Ill be pretty pysched too as this will be my first wild edible discovery!
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  #2  
Old 06-24-2013, 12:50 AM
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Looks to be. I've never eaten it personally, but I feed a lot of it to the chickens. I think it's supposed to be really high in iron. Congrats!

Another wild edible that should be pretty easy to find is dandelion. Also poke weed was a staple around here years ago, but do your research. I think it gets toxic if it gets too mature.
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:57 AM
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Yep, that's lamb's quarters (aka pig-weed) - it's best when young.
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Old 06-24-2013, 02:24 AM
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Yes it is.
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Old 06-24-2013, 09:28 AM
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Sure is and if you like it I have plenty growing around my property you may have. Come and get it.
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Old 06-24-2013, 09:40 AM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Every year, we freeze lots of lamb's quarters, along with amaranth and galinsoga. That combo is our favorite greens.
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:00 PM
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I've been pulling them out of my garden every day. Might as well start adding them to the salad.

Yes, I knew they were edible, but I have never tried them.

While we're there.....
What other common plants are your favorite salad greens?
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Old 06-24-2013, 05:17 PM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Thanks for the replies. Of course i forgot dandelions obviously.But its pretty neat to find something at least for me a little less common. I tried a few leaves of it. Its not bad. Wilted in a pan with some butter and onion it might be good
Any other preperations of it people like? I also found some chicory. Wondering how to make tea from the roots. That might be my next project
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Old 06-24-2013, 10:42 PM
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Pig weed is something different around here, but a pig would eat lambsquarters. Funny, I cooked a mess of it yesterday. In my estimation, lambs quarters is the best of greens hands down. I consider it a voluntary vegetable in my garden. It also freezes well. After it gts a certain size I chop them down, that is why we had greens yesterday, the plants are getting to big and tough otherwise. What am I saying,they get really big, but while in their prime they are very good. We do not like cooked dandelions, I make those as a salad, same as chicory. Very tasty.
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Old 07-01-2013, 11:19 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Yes and I let many of them grow to seed, they are a "good" weed. More nutritional than spinach. The greens are best when smalll then get woody

Closely related to Quinowa, you can eat the grain/seeds too, that are better than rice or wheat.

P.S. I believe they will cross pollinate with Quinowa
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Old 07-02-2013, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenBC View Post
Yep, that's lamb's quarters (aka pig-weed) - it's best when young.
LQ and PW are to seperate weeds.

Here's PW:

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Old 07-02-2013, 11:59 AM
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Could be in your neck o' the woods Jardude, but up here the same plant is called by both names.
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Old 07-02-2013, 06:01 PM
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We have loads of lambs quarters everywhere. I try to pull them out as much as possible. I have eaten them in the past, lightly cooked. They taste like spinach but the texture is a little more slimey. They're edible, but I wouldn't say good. My chickens do like them though.
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Old 07-03-2013, 01:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenBC View Post
Yep, that's lamb's quarters (aka pig-weed) - it's best when young.
Karen, you are correct. It is lambs quarter but lambs quarter is not the weed commonly known as pig weed. Pig weed, a.k.a. red roots is actually amaranth.

I have always wondered why lambsquarter goes by that name as sheep have to be starving before they'll eat it, though.
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:28 AM
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I don't think amaranth is common here, though I have heard of people starting to consider growing it here as a grain crop. Mostly everyone in this neck of the woods does call that plant first pictured by either name - but I'm sure getting the idea that it isn't that way in other areas!

I've not had sheep yet, but when I raised pigs they treated that stuff like a delicacy and ate all the seed heads off of it. It's the first thing that grows here on tilled land, I have a huge crop of it this year on the side of the potato patch that didn't get planted.
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Old 07-03-2013, 01:01 PM
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In Ontario, lambs quarters and pigweed are two different plants. Interesting!
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Old 07-04-2013, 01:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotherCharlotte View Post
In Ontario, lambs quarters and pigweed are two different plants. Interesting!
It is everywhere else too.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sorry Karen but anyone that calls lambsquarter a pigweed doesn't know their weeds from their bunghole.
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:16 PM
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It is everywhere else too.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sorry Karen but anyone that calls lambsquarter a pigweed doesn't know their weeds from their bunghole.
Nice Jardude. That wasn't necessary.
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Old 07-04-2013, 02:27 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Well, here amaranth is pigweed too. I have also read in edible plant articles on line and in magazines that lamb's quarters is also called pigweed. That's why scientific names are used..so there can be no confusion.
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Old 07-08-2013, 01:05 AM
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I have a book that i would highly recommend, it is called " Edible wild plants, a North American Guide" an outdoor life book.

it breaks everything down to seasons, and pictures and what it is good for
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