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  #1  
Old 09-01-2013, 03:01 PM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Default RR spike knife

Forged another knife. This one from a railroad spike I found walking some local tracks. Pictured with the knife is another spike I found that day for contrast. I want to clean up the blade some more but Im pretty pleased its much better than my last one. Still not perfect but better and thats the goal to get better with everyone I make

Heres the pic
http://i1285.photobucket.com/albums/...ps89e30119.jpg
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Old 09-04-2013, 03:53 AM
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Nice Work!
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:35 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Very cool. Skillz!
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:45 AM
HuskerHomesteader Male HuskerHomesteader is offline
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That is really nice! Any plans for the other spike? I remember seeing a video once of a gentleman who turned a railraod spike into a tomahawk. Looking forward to see what you make of it!
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Old 09-06-2013, 03:29 AM
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Nicely done! Do rail spikes have what it takes for a decent edge?
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:35 AM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HuskerHomesteader View Post
That is really nice! Any plans for the other spike? I remember seeing a video once of a gentleman who turned a railraod spike into a tomahawk. Looking forward to see what you make of it!
Yup indeed. Heres what happened to it. Think this one is my better.
The handle is pearwood from my backyard came out really pretty the hammer marks almost look like scribing or something

http://i1285.photobucket.com/albums/...ps27d2f938.jpg
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:41 AM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randallhilton View Post
Nicely done! Do rail spikes have what it takes for a decent edge?

That is a subject of great debate among blacksmiths from what Ive researched
Some say yes, some say no. In my limited experience Id say they are OK depending on the spike. They have different makeups. The one second one I made is shaving sharp right now. I think thats more of me getting better at beveling though than the quality of the steel. Well see how they last. If you cruise the blacksmith forum the subject is much like using rebar it seems to be a hit or miss kinda thing. They are great for practice tho since they are free.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:44 AM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HuskerHomesteader View Post
That is really nice! Any plans for the other spike? I remember seeing a video once of a gentleman who turned a railraod spike into a tomahawk. Looking forward to see what you make of it!

Ive seen the hawk vids too I think spikes would be better suited to small hatchets and hawks as opposed to knives and I very well might try one next. I just need a steel analog for the handle to drive through
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Old 09-08-2013, 01:09 AM
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Very nice looking knife. I knew a guy that made knives out of about everything. Roller chains off combines, chainsaw chains, lots of different things. He changed jobs suddenly and I lost track of him, but would enjoy seeing his latest projects if he still does that type of thing. I really like the looks of the pear handle.
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Old 09-10-2013, 01:10 AM
HuskerHomesteader Male HuskerHomesteader is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejnovinsky View Post
Yup indeed. Heres what happened to it. Think this one is my better.
The handle is pearwood from my backyard came out really pretty the hammer marks almost look like scribing or something

http://i1285.photobucket.com/albums/...ps27d2f938.jpg
Wow! I think I like that one even more!!
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:12 AM
ejnovinsky Male ejnovinsky is offline
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Thanks! They still arent quite what I want. The beveling isnt quite right but getting closer. I have a file knife in the works right now thats comin along really good
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Old 09-13-2013, 01:18 AM
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I like the knife--but that handle is awesome.
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Old 02-14-2014, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejnovinsky View Post
Thanks! They still arent quite what I want. The beveling isnt quite right but getting closer. I have a file knife in the works right now thats comin along really good
If you are forging tool steel like your file, get it HOT before you start with the hammer and be careful with your quench.
Files are hard, but brittle you have to make sure you are hot enough for the dentrels in the metal to release.
It can be hard to shape as it doesn't flow like the softer steel in your spikes.

Each steel you work with has different properties and handle differently when you work them. High carbon steels can be brittle, hard to work where for most folks just starting out, a low carbon or mild steel like railroad spikes or rebar are much easier and cheaper to learn on.

I use spring steel for my knives as they have better flex and aren't as brittle as file knives, and if I temper to wheat/straw. They are nearly as hard as tool steel, and difficult to work, but while difficult to sharpen, the knife will hold an edge for an unbelievable amount of time.

Softer steels like railroad spikes are much easier to sharpen, but don't hold their edge as long even when tempered hard, but they are still better than the stainless production knives you buy at the store.

Looks like you are off to a good start, keep up the good work

I've been smithing for nearly 30 years. It's a great skill to have.
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Old 02-15-2014, 03:31 AM
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Nice work!! Not sure I have the skill for attempting a RR spike but I have two of them. I use them for place keepers when splitting wood.

I've been using hack saw blades from my reciprocating saw to make a few small knives. They are good hard steel, hold an decent edge and I will often leave the last few teeth on it. Hack sawing with a recip only uses about 1 inch of the entire length of the blade and the last inch or so is behind the guard so I decided to use it for other things. I also made a "scriber" with one of them for wood working as well as metal but tend to go back to my carbide scriber for metal...leaves a better line.
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