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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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Old 10-02-2013, 12:11 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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Default Rocket stove/heater

I've been researching DIY options for a wood stove for our little shack/cabin.

I really like the concept of the rocket mass heaters, but the old place just doesn't have the structure necessary to support all that mass. A "traditional" wood stove looked like the only alternative.

Today I was googling around and found a few youtube vids and some web sites with people building rocket stoves or rocket heaters.

These use propane or compressor tanks with an insulated fire tube inside and the traditional rocket feed box. Instead of sinking the tank and the flu in thermal mass material, they just use a traditional flu pipe.

So, perhaps you don't get all the benefits of a rocket mass heater, but you get something more efficient than a "fire in a box" and it's still largely self-feeding and smoke free.

Anyone built something like this? I'm thinking of doing so.

I bought an old Ranger pickup and the PO fabricated a rear bumper out of heavy wall 4" pipe. Would make a great fire tube. If I can scrounge up a compressor tank, I think I can build the rest from scrap and there's a great metal distributor in my area with a discount scrap pile I can go through (or order any pieces I need).
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Old 10-02-2013, 03:44 PM
HuntingHawk HuntingHawk is offline
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Compressor tank I think is thinner metal then you want to use as would be a water tank. Maybe something like a large beer keg.
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:05 AM
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the outer wall doesn't have to be super substantial since it technically won't get very hot. The burner tube reaches over 1,000 degrees, which is where its efficiency comes from.

Here's an informative discussion on design.
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Old 10-11-2013, 10:25 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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I ended up replacing my compressor, so I have the tank set aside from the old one. It's pretty darned heavy so I think it will work well. It's a 30 gallon, IIRC. Around 18" diameter.

The bumper on the project vehicle is a 4" pipe that's at least 1/8" thick - maybe 3/16. I think that will work out OK for the burn tube once I cut all the bracketry off.

I plan on getting some sort of large diameter square tubing for the firebox, and a plate of thick steel (maybe 1/4) for the top. My wife wants to be able to cook on the top and the compressor tank is pretty rounded up there, plus I figure that's where the hottest exposure of heat to the outer casing is going to be, so it needs to be thick enough not to warp.

Not sure what those latter two pieces are going to cost me yet.

I'm in the middle of completely reorganizing my garage/workshop since I'll be spending a lot of time in it over the next few months once the time changes - too dark to work outside when I get home from work. It's been needed for a few years and I have a lot of stuff to go through. Probably won't get to the stove again for a few months, but I'll accumulate more parts in the meantime.
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Old 10-11-2013, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
I plan on getting some sort of large diameter square tubing for the firebox, and a plate of thick steel (maybe 1/4) for the top
Many years ago I worked for a company that made furnaces for melting metals, and induction heating equipment

Some of the ones we built could hold up to 100 TONS of molten steel:


http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...es&FORM=HDRSC2

Based on those years of experience at fabrication, I wouldn't suggest using ANY steel less than 3/8's due to the way it warps when heated to extreme temperatures
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Old 10-15-2013, 01:32 AM
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http://www.permies.com/forums/f-125/rocket-stoves

Paul Wheaton posts here too.
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Old 10-16-2013, 03:06 AM
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Paul Wheaton posts here too.
There are few places he DOESN'T post
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Old 10-18-2013, 03:35 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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Honestly, I think the amount of time and effort spent on discussing saving money on this stove design or that stove design is a complete waste of effort, because that's not where the real expenses are!

The REAL expense of installing a wood burner is the chimney system. Focus your attention on that, and you'll find you can simply mix and match different stoves once your chimney is in place. I already have. Class III chimney pipe is expensive, and a code-conforming chimney may cost the price of SEVERAL wood burners.
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