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Water Drinking water, wells, ponds, saving, purifying, etc.

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Old 10-09-2013, 02:53 AM
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Default new way to filter water

I always have liked the K.I.S.S. system," Keep it simple stupid" My Idea is to find the smallest furnace filter they make. Then build a wooden box with no bottom except for three wooden runners ( two sides and one end) you could slide the filter in or just lay it in. Then set the box over the inlet to your water container and let nature take it's course. When the filter starts to clog up, just take it out and back flush it with a hose. I believe this would stop some pollen, leaves and other stuff from getting into your tank. Do you think it will work.
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Old 10-09-2013, 03:02 AM
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Many of those filters have paper frames
I doubt they will hold up in water

If you're just worried about larger particles/debris, a simple piece of linen or cheesecloth would work
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Old 10-09-2013, 11:09 PM
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We used a five gallon bucket with a hole in the bottom and a grid with a piece of quilt batting on top.

I like your idea, if the furnace filter is sturdy enough.
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Old 10-10-2013, 12:08 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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You might look into the filter for air filtration devices. Some of the one's I've seen have some sort of plastic matrix within an aluminum frame. Probably have to support it with some sort of hardware cloth or chicken wire to keep it from collapsing.

I'll admit to knowing little about water filtration, but I would think something as thin as an air filter would not do a whole lot. Seems most water filters are based on having a thick level of medium that the water can trickle through so there are plenty of small voids to catch particulates.

But ya never know until ya try. If you think it would work, give it a whirl and see what results you get.
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Old 10-10-2013, 04:06 AM
billygoatgruff Male billygoatgruff is offline
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Yes, it will work.

We probably need to compare definitions of working tho as mine says: pollen - maybe, leaves - probably, stuff - depends.

In water filtration, speed is an enemy unless you have some truly high tech materials. And pressure. But too much pressure leads to speed and speed is an enemy.

You might want to think about just using filter sand. The thickness of the sand layer are out there on the web. And if you use gravity to provide the pressure to drive it (already are doing this) then 2 gpm per sq ft of top surface area is an old thumbnail number. Scrape off the top x inches when too dirty and replace.

Or go see the septic tank guy and find out about the geotextile that wraps around the rock in a septic lateral. It might be better, might be worse. Might be worth checking out for the rough filtering described. Might not. High tech tho...

John
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:50 AM
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It sounds like you're mainly trying to keep debris out of your tank. Your plan would work but I would try to salvage the poly mesh filters from some dead window unit air conditioners. They're made to get wet and have a pretty fine mesh.
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Old 10-11-2013, 01:51 AM
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Originally Posted by randallhilton View Post
It sounds like you're mainly trying to keep debris out of your tank. Your plan would work but I would try to salvage the poly mesh filters from some dead window unit air conditioners. They're made to get wet and have a pretty fine mesh.
Now thats what I talking about, thanks for the suggestion
OGB
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:49 AM
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Are you using a rain catch system?

If so, also consider a method for shunting the initial few gallons as they carry the bulk of the debris off your catchment surface (roof or whatever).
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Old 10-11-2013, 05:33 AM
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How about a basket out of an old drip coffee pot & use coffee filters?
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Old 10-12-2013, 01:18 AM
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Originally Posted by HuntingHawk View Post
How about a basket out of an old drip coffee pot & use coffee filters?
I had thought about doing the coffee filer method but with a good mountain shower I can fill up two fifty gal. barrels in an hour, sometimes more. I think the coffee filters would overflow. I was thinking about tying a ladies nylon to act as a filter which might just work out.
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Old 10-15-2013, 10:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridbob View Post
I had thought about doing the coffee filer method but with a good mountain shower I can fill up two fifty gal. barrels in an hour, sometimes more. I think the coffee filters would overflow. I was thinking about tying a ladies nylon to act as a filter which might just work out.
I have used that----and they come in all Sizes---clean easily and are not expensive.+
On my down pout of my catchment system----and I formed window screen wire to my barrels off of the eves of the house--Donot use the black plastic screen wire--doesnt do the heat or hard cold well.+

Adapt---amazing how we can re-purpose things.
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Old 10-17-2013, 03:01 AM
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Default filter

correct me if i am wrong but i read somewhere that if you use rain water off of your roof, the water can be bad because of the make up of the shingles. not really sure if it is true or not but i sure would like to know if it safe. it's a very good idea. thanks and take care. davin
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Old 10-17-2013, 01:28 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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If you want to filter water get a filter designed to filter water. I would think it could be possible for a heater filter to break down or come part if it where wet, esp. for long period of times. This may be hazardous to your health. If you are using a pump you could clog it, it could even clog you pipes.

With a furnace filter even with slightly pressurized air you can ruin the filter. Water is heavier than air, (this would be similar to pressurized air, more force pushing through the filter) I don't think an air filter would be very effective filtering water.

If your goal is removing larger particulates and this is to end up (after further filtration) as drinking water, what about something like this?



http://www.aliexpress.com/wholesale/...reen-mesh.html

Last edited by ROnMO; 10-17-2013 at 02:52 PM.
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Old 10-20-2013, 04:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davin View Post
correct me if i am wrong but i read somewhere that if you use rain water off of your roof, the water can be bad because of the make up of the shingles. not really sure if it is true or not but i sure would like to know if it safe. it's a very good idea. thanks and take care. davin
It depends and I don't know.

And I don't believe you will ever get a standard answer for a particular roof without testing of the roof. But I've been wrong before...

http://www.tylertork.com/diyrainbarrels/safety.html and the link at the bottom of that page.

I'm sorry there isn't just one answer. Too many variables.

John
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Old 06-29-2014, 01:29 PM
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Default Berkey filter

I catch water from my roof to use on my plants. If I ever had to use it for drinking i would filter it through my Berkey filter. Has anyone ever done that?
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Old 06-29-2014, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by KarenNms View Post
I catch water from my roof to use on my plants. If I ever had to use it for drinking i would filter it through my Berkey filter. Has anyone ever done that?
Yes but i didnt know at the time to use a dark barrel.
I used white and fought an algae build up.
When I knew it was going to rain I would empty the barrel
and pour bleach in it,so that it would almost self clean.
Of course I gave it a scrubbing.

I didnt use a filter system.
I used un-scented bleach.

A NOTE:Be careful as you can over do bleach and it'll give you a tummy ache: I know:
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Old 06-29-2014, 03:48 PM
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I have built a frame (wood) with hardware cloth. Then apply cotton sheets/old tee shirts etc. This takes a lot of the solids out of the water, plus it can be reused and cleaned. The more layers of the cloth you use the finer the filter.
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Old 06-29-2014, 04:42 PM
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" Ancient "
http://www.theprepperjournal.com/201...r-in-a-barrel/

" 100-Year-Old Way to Filter Rainwater in a Barrel
By Linda Holliday on July 11, 2013

During our boiling, broiling, blistering summer of 2012 here in the Missouri Ozarks, water was a topic of conversation wherever we went. Creeks and ponds dried up (some never recovered) and the water table dropped, forcing a few neighbors to have their well pumps lowered or to even have deeper wells drilled.WaterBuck blog rain barrel

Many folks shared memories of rain barrels, cisterns, hand pumps and drawing water with a well bucket as a child, ..... "


“Take a new vinegar barrel or an oak tub that has never been used, either a full cask or half size. Stand it on end raised on brick or stone from the ground. Insert a faucet near the bottom. Make a tight false bottom 3 or 4 inches from the bottom of the cask. Perforate this with small gimlet holes, and cover it with a piece of clean white canvas.

“Place on this false bottom a layer of clean pebbles 3 or 4 inches in thickness; next, a layer of clean washed sand and gravel; then coarsely granulated charcoal about the size of small peas. Charcoal made from hard maple is the best.

“After putting in a half bushel or so, pound it down firmly. Then put in more until the tub is filled within 1 foot of the top. Add a 3-inch layer of pebbles; and throw over the top a piece of canvas as a strainer. This canvas strainer can be removed and washed occasionally and the cask can be dumped out, pebbles cleansed and charcoal renewed every spring and fall, or once a year may be sufficient.

“This filter may be set in the cellar and used only for drinking water. Or it may be used in time of drought for filtering stagnant water, which would otherwise be unpalatable, for the use of stock. This also makes a good cider filter for the purpose of making vinegar. The cider should first be passed through cheese cloth to remove all coarser particles.

“Or a small cheap filter may be made from a flower pot. A fine sponge may be inserted in the hole and the pot filled about as directed for the above filter. It may be placed in the top of a jar, which will receive the filtered water.”
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Old 07-31-2015, 07:20 PM
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A friend of mine with a catchment system has been using those green "pot scrubbers" for years. The ones he gets at Costco are huge not those little ones you use in the kitchen.
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