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Hunting/Fishing/Trapping Hunting, Fishing, Trapping and related conversations.

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  #1  
Old 10-28-2013, 03:30 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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Default Food plots

I have about 12 acres of woods I have thinned out. It s up against some pasture and then National Forest. In the cleared areas I have planted apple and pear trees and some clover.

There are turnkey and deer in my area. I want to bring them in. I am doing this for the meat and just to do it. I am not really into hunting, I think more of it as harvesting.

Being able to create a habitat for them to come to is of more interest to me then the hunting. I have no issue taking a deer or a turkey to eat but not looking for trophies.
Any suggestion what else to plant or do?

Last edited by ROnMO; 10-28-2013 at 04:32 PM.
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Old 10-28-2013, 10:44 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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They like buckwheat.
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Old 11-02-2013, 09:49 PM
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There should be a feed plot mix for your growing zone.....

I would go to my local farm supply, buy a small bag of seed and keep the ingredient list from it. Then duplicate or adjust ingredients to suit my self....

Like said, buckwheat, alfalfa, dent corn, a little oats.... Depends on he make up of your ground, woods, and hunting blind locations.... Even if you only hunt with a trail cam....

Enjoy...
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Old 11-26-2013, 07:05 PM
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Clover would be the best thing to plant, since it won't grow too tall, and it will provide Nitirogen

Peas would work well too.

If you don't protect those fruit trees, I imagine they will be consumed also
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Old 11-26-2013, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROnMO View Post
I have about 12 acres of woods I have thinned out. It s up against some pasture and then National Forest. In the cleared areas I have planted apple and pear trees and some clover.

There are turnkey and deer in my area. I want to bring them in. I am doing this for the meat and just to do it. I am not really into hunting, I think more of it as harvesting.

Being able to create a habitat for them to come to is of more interest to me then the hunting. I have no issue taking a deer or a turkey to eat but not looking for trophies.
Any suggestion what else to plant or do?
Have you asked the local agricultural extension office? They or local Natural Resources or Wildlife office can tell you what the local deer prefer. Deer are browsers and like leaves and much as grains.
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Old 11-26-2013, 08:39 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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You can also include a salt link somewhere convenient. Just buy a cheap 50lb bag of water softener salt and dig a shallow hole where you want the lick to be. Blend the salt with the soil taken from the hole, then fill the hole back up with the salt/soil mix. Toss a single handfull of salt on top of the whole thing to get initial attraction started faster. Once animals know there's salt there, they'll paw at the ground to get at it, but won't be able to strip it out all at once because you've dug it down.

One important caviat though. Check your state's hunting regs in relation to food plots and salt licks. Either may be considered to be "baiting" which may or may not be legal in your state.
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  #7  
Old 11-29-2013, 04:36 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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Thanks................
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Old 11-30-2013, 12:14 AM
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In Washington you can't put down a bail of alfalfa or apples and hunt over it but it's OK if you hunt them in an alfalfa field or under apple trees. I,m going to plant white clover because it spreads well
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Old 11-30-2013, 02:49 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Where do you live (sort of ) and when is hunting seasons?

That will make a great difference in the food being availible.

Clover and buckwheat are great, unless you are hunting late ML season in Jan or Dec.....

Apples that are late season to match your deer season, beech is an another early mast crop.

Then maybe some oak or browse that stays on the bushes.

I have seen starving deer in 3 ft snow eating mushrooms off oak, tops/buds from logging or strorms.

I forgot things like broccoli and kale that survive hard frosts and you can eat too
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:03 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Professor View Post
Where do you live (sort of ) and when is hunting seasons?

That will make a great difference in the food being availible.

Clover and buckwheat are great, unless you are hunting late ML season in Jan or Dec.....

Apples that are late season to match your deer season, beech is an another early mast crop.

Then maybe some oak or browse that stays on the bushes.

I have seen starving deer in 3 ft snow eating mushrooms off oak, tops/buds from logging or strorms.

I forgot things like broccoli and kale that survive hard frosts and you can eat too

For deer and turkey it is fall. There is sometimes an additional deer season in January.

I do like the idea of planting what I could also eat.
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:29 PM
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there are lots of "food plot" products on the market. some you don't even have to cultivate the soil. you just cast them.

another thing you can do is plant berry and fruiting trees

BTW there is nothing wrong with trophy hunting, it is what keeps the animal count up.
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Old 12-09-2013, 12:24 AM
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In this part of the woods, I'm going to stick with Northern Blend grass seed in the yard that gets some sun..... A little clover or alfalfa along the edges of the woods where there is intermittent sun.... I also have about a 6' diameter bunch of Hosta in a planter that the deer think is a salad bar... That is sacrificial so they will leave the other flower beds alone....

If I plant anything like an apple tree or berry bush and nurture it until it produces fruit...... I'm going to keep it in a bear proof cage.... That's necessary in this area.....

Good luck
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  #13  
Old 12-09-2013, 06:15 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papa bear View Post
there are lots of "food plot" products on the market. some you don't even have to cultivate the soil. you just cast them.

another thing you can do is plant berry and fruiting trees

BTW there is nothing wrong with trophy hunting, it is what keeps the animal count up.
I wasn't trying to say it was wrong. I have no problem with trophy hunting, as long as the meat goes to good use. You can use it to feed your dogs and I would be fine with that. My goal is getting meat and making it easier and more efficient. Big deer are definitely welcome.
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Old 12-09-2013, 07:48 PM
TickFarmer TickFarmer is offline
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From your description I would think the critters have most of their needs met in the areas around you. The big three reasons for anything to stay in a particular area, after a sense of safety and factoring in population density is Food, Water and Shelter. Most everyone has mentioned the food part.
One thing you didn’t mention was water. Maybe a small pond or water tank would help hold them in your woods. Shelter could be as simple as letting an acre or so grow up into thickets and brambles.
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  #15  
Old 12-09-2013, 08:05 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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I have a pond in my "upper field" (about 10 acres) maybe 1/8 mile but I keep a few caves up there from time to time. That area is flat and surrounded by a couple homes and a rural HWY. I don't want to shot rifles up there. The way the bottom land lays so I can make safe shoots. It is up against a massive field and forestry. There are thick woods and no homes or roads that direction. All shots fired would be from high ground to low ground landing on my property. There is another pond maybe a quarter mile the other direction, not on my property. There is still enough woods for cover and even some tops from the logging.

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  #16  
Old 12-09-2013, 08:17 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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This is my poperty and the surronding area. it is a crappy pic. You can see my homeon the left edged just above the dirt road. My field with the pond in not on the pic but to the left. My poperty ends before the field. The field ends in national forestry.This pic is before it was logged. There is still plenty of woods.
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Old 12-10-2013, 01:21 PM
papa bear papa bear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROnMO View Post
I wasn't trying to say it was wrong. I have no problem with trophy hunting, as long as the meat goes to good use. You can use it to feed your dogs and I would be fine with that. My goal is getting meat and making it easier and more efficient. Big deer are definitely welcome.
Oh, no problem. i have never been able to find a way to eat the antlers either

as a mater of fact, an old deer is like an old goat. it is better to give it to the dogs. i prefer 2yr olds buck and does.
like someone said, find out your laws. a food plot in most states is legal to hunt over. but remember, it is your land. there's not a lot someone can do any thing about it

i just wanted to point out the trophy thing because of the attitudes of traditions (?), you run into these days. decades ago, people meat hunted. then that was deemed bad, and trophy hunting was thought better. then trophy hunting became the bad thing. but that is what is saving the wildlife in Africa. the pendulum swings

but you have already bucked the "common knowledge" by doing a clear cut. i have argued this with so called forest student, that has been taught, forest fires/clear cutting is bad. deer can not find food in old growth woods. they need the second growth for browse and cover

but don't sweat it. you have done good in what you have done. you could also (per law), set up feeders. i know in most states you have to be a certain distance from them to hunt
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Old 12-10-2013, 02:13 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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We grind the meat of the older deer for sausage, burgers, or jerky. I didn't do a clear cut.

Last edited by ROnMO; 12-11-2013 at 12:33 AM.
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Old 12-20-2013, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by papa bear View Post
but you have already bucked the "common knowledge" by doing a clear cut. i have argued this with so called forest student, that has been taught, forest fires/clear cutting is bad. deer can not find food in old growth woods. they need the second growth for browse and cover
Decades ago, in an ecology class, we were taught that game needs food, water, and cover. Therefore if you are cutting a large area to make it better for wild life then leaving the occasional tree makes it better.

There is clear cutting and there is clear cutting: if a patch of meadow is surrounded by woods then cover is close enough: if not then leaving a few trees is better!

As for food plots: before I got my dog the deer did enjoy my string beans! I do not know if beans would do well without care, but the deer do eat them!
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Old 12-20-2013, 05:22 PM
ROnMO ROnMO is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terri View Post
Decades ago, in an ecology class, we were taught that game needs food, water, and cover. Therefore if you are cutting a large area to make it better for wild life then leaving the occasional tree makes it better.

There is clear cutting and there is clear cutting: if a patch of meadow is surrounded by woods then cover is close enough: if not then leaving a few trees is better!

As for food plots: before I got my dog the deer did enjoy my string beans! I do not know if beans would do well without care, but the deer do eat them!

The area in red is the area I am focusing on. The green shapes surround the areas that have been cleared and I am planting. The blue circles are water sources that always have water.


Last edited by ROnMO; 12-20-2013 at 05:40 PM.
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