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  #1  
Old 10-31-2013, 07:58 PM
cleb cleb is offline
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Default Sawdust toilet you wife and family will use

I just installed my second composting toilet and posted a couple of videos of the build along with a writeup at my site



This one goes over the build

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPdnMuokEw8

http://www.bethnchris.com/2013/10/22...awdust-toilet/

Part 2 - I made one design change... the rest is cosmetic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PO2S67_9eVA

http://www.bethnchris.com/2013/10/27...ceiling-beams/

And anyone who says their wife won't use one of these is wrong. My wife is a total city girl and after some grumbling she came around... We have had city guests out and not a single complaint. Most have questions about it but no complaints...

The kids don't even care... and I have two girls...

buffcleb
http://www.bethnchris.com
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  #2  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:51 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Ours has the sawdust bin on the other side.
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  #3  
Old 10-31-2013, 11:26 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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I built this at our house in the city.



The roof and sides unbolt from the base. I loaded it into our pickup and hauled it down to our rural place.







Our soil is filled with clay, so a septic system would be a very expensive setup. If we can eventually move there, we'll likely build an inside version.

We are only down on weekends and vacations, but it works very well.

I used the Separette seat which separates solid and liquids. The solids go into a 5 gallon pail that we line with biodegradable trash bags (way easier than washing out the bucket) that we toss in a compost area. Liquids go into a smaller pail, but I'm thinking of just running a pipe out the back.
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Old 11-01-2013, 12:05 AM
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looks great... I have looked at doing a liquid diversion but not built one with it yet... I just empty the buckets when they are half full and wash things out... once you have done it a couple of times its no big deal...
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  #5  
Old 11-01-2013, 12:12 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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We have to haul water to our place or get it from a spring at the lowest point in the property.

It's a heckuva trip hauling water from the spring up the hill to anywhere else, so, for us, the water's too valuable to use to wash out a bucket when the biodegradable bags are so inexpensive and convenient.

I suspect long term, we'd ditch the bags and just wash the buckets if it was less work.
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  #6  
Old 11-04-2013, 04:51 PM
cleb cleb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisser View Post
We have to haul water to our place or get it from a spring at the lowest point in the property.

It's a heckuva trip hauling water from the spring up the hill to anywhere else, so, for us, the water's too valuable to use to wash out a bucket when the biodegradable bags are so inexpensive and convenient.

I suspect long term, we'd ditch the bags and just wash the buckets if it was less work.
We haul our drinking water but bucket wash water comes from a well on the property... properly washing each bucket probably takes 5 gallons of water and a little bit of bleach...

in case of emergency we could wash them less frequently and leave them out in the rain and sun but for now I prefer our current methods...

cleb
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  #7  
Old 11-04-2013, 08:37 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Our set up is a bit wider. On the right is a bin with a lid that holds a bucket of sawdust. In the middle is the toilet seat and on the left is a compartment that holds a dozen rolls of toilet paper.
Ffive gallons of water to wash a bucket? What for? We have a couple of buckets. Line it with newspaper, put in a layer of sawdust, ready to go. We empty it when it is full. Guys know best what the proper time is. We have a dolly for that. any solids wash with a toilet brush, put a squirt of dish soap in, a quart or so of water, wash again and rinse. OUr buckets have been used for ten years now.
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  #8  
Old 11-04-2013, 09:35 PM
cleb cleb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormom View Post
Our set up is a bit wider. On the right is a bin with a lid that holds a bucket of sawdust. In the middle is the toilet seat and on the left is a compartment that holds a dozen rolls of toilet paper.
Ffive gallons of water to wash a bucket? What for? We have a couple of buckets. Line it with newspaper, put in a layer of sawdust, ready to go. We empty it when it is full. Guys know best what the proper time is. We have a dolly for that. any solids wash with a toilet brush, put a squirt of dish soap in, a quart or so of water, wash again and rinse. OUr buckets have been used for ten years now.
I hose about a gallon of water then swish around... dump and another gallon swish... dump add bleach and a gallon and switch then let it sit... dump that and I am good... been doing that for about 5 years in my other bathroom...

so I guess three gallons... give or take

I was restricted on space to get everything in the closet we're using as a bathroom... but I can still get 9 rolls in the box for storage... just have to stack them should keep the mice from getting at them... god I hate mice...

cleb
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http://www.bethnchris.com
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  #9  
Old 11-12-2013, 06:18 PM
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Default Finished Product?

I watched the second video and since the sound on my computer isn't working, I have to ask; "What are you doing with the 'finished product' i.e. once the bucket is full? My thoughts drift on this subject. Perhaps you discussed it on the video but as I said, no sound.

My mind wandered back to my days on Signal Hill in Viet Nam. We had wooden outhouses and used 1/3 of a 50 gallon drum for a receptacle. This was then removed, had diesel fuel added to it and burned (under my professional supervision...

This sawdust model begs the question I came up with now. I saw one video where a guy used the plastic buckets and sealed them after filling and allowed the bucket to sit under his house for some undisclosed period of time to "decompose" and really not sure what he did with the contents after that.

My guess is that somewhere in the middle would be a good compromise. If you put the sawdust into the bottom of the 50 or 30 gallon drum (along with the intended contents) then remove that and replace it with a clean drum and burn the contents of the other drum, you would have little or no need to use water to clean the barrel container.

Since I have not as yet tried this configuration I may be "talking out of school" here but I just wondered how that might work in terms of eliminating the "finished product" and keeping it out of the garden where only bad things can come of using it there.

Anyone want to add or discus this?
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  #10  
Old 11-12-2013, 06:32 PM
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A good text on this is "The Humanure Handbook". I believe it's available out there in PDF form.

Essentially, you compost the waste. It takes a few years, as I recall, but it's eventually suitable for the garden.

I think most people set up annual compost stalls. You'd have one for 2013 filling up, then start a new one for 2014. At some point (I think it was 3 years, but I could be wrong), you use the first one for compost and start the process again.
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  #11  
Old 11-12-2013, 08:25 PM
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Two years is standard procedure.
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  #12  
Old 11-12-2013, 09:20 PM
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Please read the book if you are building you first composting toilet.
http://humanurehandbook.com/contents.html

Download for FREE here: http://humanurehandbook.com/download...ndbook_all.pdf

Using a urine diverter is advisable.
http://www.ecovita.net/privy.html

Download Plans for "The Lovable Loo" for FREE here: http://humanurehandbook.com/store/Loveable-Loo/

Last edited by DavidOH; 11-12-2013 at 09:31 PM.
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  #13  
Old 11-14-2013, 01:10 PM
cleb cleb is offline
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yeah we compost the contents... I have been running the sawdust bathroom for about 4 years and have not filled the once 4x4x4 area we compost in yet (this is for a weekend place). when I do fill this area I will make another storage location next to it and start filling that one...

I will probably take the decomposed contents after a couple of years and spread it on the forrest floor... or if I ever get around to planting fruit trees I might use it there...

oh and I agree... go read the handbook... everything is spelled out there...

cleb
http://youtube.com/buffcleb
http://www.bethnchris.com
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  #14  
Old 12-02-2013, 12:46 AM
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Default Catalyst?

One thing that has occurred to me is the idea of a catalyst. Most of us know that a catalyst generally aids in the reaction but does not necessarily become part of the reaction.

The reason I bring this up is that the handbook encourages a rather long period of decomposition. It also does NOT mention the issue of the bacteria specific to humanure that is different from other manure, such as cattle, chicken, horse, etc. Those particular manures are known to be beneficial for use in your garden because of the improvement in the loam proportion.

Humanure when put into a "septic" system is often allowed to settle there for long periods of time but is often "removed" to make room for more. The interval for removal is dependent on the size of the tank and the number of users.

Of significance is that most septic systems encourage the use of an additive (bacterial digestion product) which improves the overall "health of the system" and it is simply "flushed down your toilet" to get it into the septic tank.

(Yes, I finally got to the point). I would like to know if anyone has done any experimentation/investigation into using a bit of that in the plastic bucket when filled from the sawdust style toilet? It would seem to me that this might just improve the process as well as shorten the time for it to be completely composted and then usable.

I have been discouraged from using humanure for edible plants however and while it may not be a really "welcome subject" here there is some data to support this concept. While the basic component of "night soil" is the same as any other, there are contents that apparently do not agree with "re-use" by humans for edible purposes. Flowers, trees, etc. seem to do very well but humanure seems to carry certain viruses that may not be killed by the composting process. These viruses and certain other disease causing structures called "PRIONs" are thought to be causative in multiple sclerosis and Creutzfeld-Jacob disease.

None of the things I have read suggest any "sterilization" procedures for humanure which give a satisfactory elimination of these particular organisms.

Have you or does anyone you know have any discussion on this particular issue that we could all benefit from?

The other issue for me is keeping the plastic bucket containers around the farm for prolonged periods of time. Does anyone have any suggestions other than an open pit compost heap for the disposal of the processed humanure?

It is an important issue in every society of the earth. We can't ignore it and in some places can't really deal with it effectively so at least here, with good discussion, we can learn how to "live with it".
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  #15  
Old 01-19-2014, 08:35 PM
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Here's what I use. Basically a box with a 5 gal. bucket to catch the solids and a diversion fixture to send the liquid outside. A floor boot with a 12 volt computer fan to blow the nasties outside via flexible drier vent pipe..





I use and cover the solids with sawdust and flush the liquid collector with a small bit of water. I keep a small trash can full of sawdust next to the fixture and cover with a handful after use. TP goes in there too. It composts just fine..

Empty once a week on a compost pile we have outside. I have 2 and cycle back and forth every year. It's good to use after it sets for a year. I throw the chicken coop stuff in there too..

We cycle the buckets. When we empty one, we leave it lay by the compost pile and grab another one that has been laying there for a week. Just bang it a few times and it cleans itself. Might have a small bit of stuff stuck to the inside but it doesn't matter. The fan doesn't allow the smell to enter the house and it's gonna get dirty again anyway..

I plant veggies in the compost and have for years. It's a little shy on nitrogen but a little chicken poo helps. This years pile should be good..

As for diseases, using stuff collected from the general public could be an issue. I know where my stuff comes from and who has what so I ain't worried about all of that..
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Last edited by 12vman; 01-19-2014 at 08:59 PM.
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  #16  
Old 01-24-2014, 04:08 AM
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So, where did you get the liquid diversion fixture? Don't make us google for urine diversion fixture...
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:52 AM
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Build yer own.. It's much cheaper.. And, they work!

http://www.ecovita.net/privy.html

I'll betcha 'Ol Ed never used one of these. These things are total trash! I "had" one and gave it away! Total waste of good money..

http://www.envirolet.com/
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  #18  
Old 04-28-2014, 10:49 PM
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We recently got the book, and are thinking about using them in our new build in the country. Pros, and Cons please. We are almost sold on the idea, but would like to hear experiences on using these inside for permanent use.
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Old 04-28-2014, 11:07 PM
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Thanks for posting everyone! Those are some cool builds!
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Old 04-28-2014, 11:44 PM
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Mine, and BWM's are permanent. Been usin' mine for at least 15 yrs. Just can't be shy to carry a bucket full of "Stuff" outside every week or so. My system works great! (Note the camo seat!)



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