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  #41  
Old 02-05-2015, 09:15 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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I found an interesting design called the Earth Auger.

http://www.criticalpracticesllc.com/

pic here: http://www.criticalpracticesllc.com/#!technology/c10d6

Hard to find anything like a drawing, but it appears that they use a large diameter PVC tube in lieu of a bucket. Then run a pvc pipe down the middle and form an archimedes screw around it with some sort of plastic material. It deposits sawdust below the seat into a chamber.

Looks like there might be some sort of rotating receptacle just below the seat that then dumps your deposit into the tube.

You push a lever rather than flushing, and it rotates the screw.

From what I've read, the screw aerates the material and pushes it along the length of the large diameter PVC pipe. By the time the material gets to the end of the pipe, it's already partially composted.
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  #42  
Old 02-09-2015, 10:41 PM
Gunnywag Gunnywag is offline
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Impressive builds!!
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  #43  
Old 05-05-2015, 11:51 PM
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I'm bumping this up because I found a well written article on their
experience: http://www.diyhousebuilding.com/bucket-toilets.html

" What Cover Materials Have The Best Odour Preventing Results?

We've experimented with many different types of cover materials including:

Peat moss
Grass clippings
Top soil
Cedar Sawdust
Wood Chip / mulch
Semi Composted wood chip
I'll run through what we discovered with each of them and just so that I feel bad ass, I'll give them a rating out of 10. "
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  #44  
Old 05-06-2015, 08:09 AM
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I'd pass on the cedar sawdust. It won't compost too easily..

I've used peat moss. It's good for soaking up liquid and it will compost nicely but good 'ol pine bedding is the best, IMO. It's cheap and will compost in a year..
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  #45  
Old 05-06-2015, 11:44 AM
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Very interesting article. I'm always on the scout for things that will work when the power goes off. It cracked me up, though, that she thought the wood chips looked more 'primitive' than the cedar shavings. This, in an article about bucket toilets?
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  #46  
Old 05-06-2015, 11:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 12vman View Post
I'd pass on the cedar sawdust. It won't compost too easily..
Yeah... exactly what they found out !

" Material: Cedar Sawdust
Rating: 7/10
Why?: For the first 4 months of using cedar sawdust as our composting toilet cover material, we thought we had hit the bucket-toilet-jackpot. Our bathroom had that beautiful cedar smell and no unpleasant odour whatsoever. We could buy huge bags of cedar for $2 from just down the road and it lasted a good couple of months. We only discovered the problem with using cedar about 4 months later... Cedar is naturally a very rot resistant timber - meaning that is doesn't break down quickly. When we checked our composting drum we expected to see beautiful compost but instead we saw cedar that looked just the same as it did when we first used it! Digging around in it with a stick we were also disappointed with the lack of composting that had taken place in our poop. You could still see it - which isn't really what you're going for. We realized that cedar sawdust was a problem for 2 reasons - its rot resistance and its lack of existing microorganisms to populate the drums and turn it all into compost. "

^ ... I think they still overrated it just for that reason. :/
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  #47  
Old 05-07-2015, 12:15 AM
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If ya wanna "Kick Start" the composting action, just go out in the woods and dig up some decayed leaves from the surface of the ground. Spread it out in the sun and let it dry. Crumble it up into powder or as small as ya can.. Throw a handful into the bucket now and then as ya would with the wood chips. Dump on to your compost pile and Wala!

Endless supply of natural microorganisms that Mother Nature provides..
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  #48  
Old 06-09-2015, 04:36 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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We bought a small cabin (about 20x22). It's across the road from our rural property and has much easier access than the 1/2 mile of rutted "road" I've had to walk up and down every time it rains.

Papers should have been signed this afternoon.

It has a pit outhouse now, but I'm going to move our composting outhouse there shortly. I built that in panels in the city, broke it down and assembled it on our rural property. So I just need to repeat that process to move it to our new place.

Because of the cabin, we're not going to build for the foreseeable future - at least 3-5 years. We're going to live in the cabin full time. Wife pointed out that trekking to any outhouse in the winter is going to get old fast.

So I'm looking into an in-house composting toilet. I really like the earth auger idea posted above, but there's still little info. Fortunately, the part of the cabin where the toilet will likely go has a good-size crawlspace under it where I can route the auger pipe.

I think I can fabricate the auger and collection chamber without much difficulty, but I'd like to build some sort of sawdust (we use pine bedding from the pet store) storage and dispensing device. In our outhouse, I just have a separate container with lid built into the seat, and we use a cup or scoop to move from one container to the other. But sawdust gets everywhere no matter how careful you are. I'll have enough height in the cabin that I should be able to dispense the sawdust between the seat and the collection chamber, making it a much cleaner operation. Plan on getting another ecovita urine diverting seat.

Any ideas on a sawdust dispenser? I'm thinking maybe a simple paddle with four flaps at the bottom of a fabricated box with sloping sides - the flaps would agitate the pile and scoop into the chamber. Worried about the material sticking together - it comes pretty densely packed from the pet store. Might be able to source saw dust from a local mill, but most are pretty far away unfortunately.

I expect to have to do some experimenting, but any pointers would be helpful. I'm not sure if there's anything else with a similar consistency as pine bedding that is routinely dispensed where I could get some ideas of what works and what doesn't.
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  #49  
Old 08-09-2015, 07:14 PM
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I just got my copy of Humanure, and am in process of reading it, but I'm wondering if any of you use the bucket in the house, with a "vent pipe" but no fan? That is what I had been planning on doing. I'm wondering if there is still smell, as long as the pipe goes up higher than the roof? I want to go off-grid (off off-grid, if you've read that book) and avoid any electric stuff. :-)

Also, what's the pros/cons of sawdust bucket in the "box" versus in a container next to the box? I had planned on a small galvanized trash can with lid next to the box, on the floor.

THANKS! Can't wait to get home and start on some projects!

:-)

MouseBandit
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