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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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  #1  
Old 01-15-2014, 02:31 AM
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Default Firewood Chopping Innovations

I don't use much firewood but it is definitely a resource I would use. Quite by accident, I stumbled across a couple of wood splitting innovations that I've never seen before but are elegantly simple yet effective.

I'm including the youtube links because they need to be seen to be believed.

Here's a spring buffered splitting maul.

Log splitting bungee.
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Old 01-15-2014, 01:25 PM
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Yes.... Both those methods work well...

I'm sure it helps that the wood they are splitting seems very strait grained and doesn't appear stringy....

Good luck
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Old 01-15-2014, 01:43 PM
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Why didnt I think of that when I was splitting wood daily---cool idea.

couldn't get the you-tube to load---gotta ck it out.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:16 PM
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That is really cool.

We have one of those Harbor Freight manual hydraulic splitters. About $100.

We're only splitting for campfires, but my wife loves it. Heckuva lot easier than a maul, wedges or axe.
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Old 01-24-2014, 11:13 PM
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I have the materials on hand and will build one on a small trailer. I too noticed the ease of splitting very dry ad strait grained wood. I will see how it works on pine and white fir.
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Old 01-28-2014, 01:35 PM
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Wow, would love to know what kind of wood he's splitting.

If you're going to make this, you'd need light straight grained wood or it definately wouldn't work.
It wouldn't work with the stringy hardwood we burn here. Must be a pine or a poplar or something that would split with an ax with a single pop. Shoot, I can wear myself to a frazzle splitting and bury a half dozen wedges. That's why I generally use my Stickler, that little baby is one of the best investments I ever made. My dad used to have a hydraulic splitter but after we got the Stickler he sold the hydraulic one and we've only used the stickler since. Works great in any kind of wood.
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Old 01-28-2014, 03:43 PM
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Wow, would love to know what kind of wood he's splitting.

If you're going to make this, you'd need light straight grained wood or it definately wouldn't work.
It wouldn't work with the stringy hardwood we burn here. Must be a pine or a poplar or something that would split with an ax with a single pop. Shoot, I can wear myself to a frazzle splitting and bury a half dozen wedges. That's why I generally use my Stickler, that little baby is one of the best investments I ever made. My dad used to have a hydraulic splitter but after we got the Stickler he sold the hydraulic one and we've only used the stickler since. Works great in any kind of wood.
Old--oak will--split a many butts of oak---hard work of course but one of the easiest.
Oak has a natural line you can see--it just takes practice.(red oak mostly is what I used.)
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Old 01-28-2014, 10:10 PM
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Old--oak will--split a many butts of oak---hard work of course but one of the easiest.
Oak has a natural line you can see--it just takes practice.(red oak mostly is what I used.)
Oak, what's that? lol That's one I've never had the pleasure of working with nor burning as we don't have it here excepting burr oak and it's too hard to get to for cutting firewood and they say it's really nasty stuff to split and as gnarled as it is, I'd reckon it's so.
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Old 01-28-2014, 11:57 PM
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Oak, what's that? lol That's one I've never had the pleasure of working with nor burning as we don't have it here excepting burr oak and it's too hard to get to for cutting firewood and they say it's really nasty stuff to split and as gnarled as it is, I'd reckon it's so.
Oak s a mainstay wood for wood burners---it s dream to split---we also have golden oak and I wont use it for fire. You can tho--it should be used for making furniture etc.
Some black oak and God forbid elm--nasty stuff to split unless its dried just right.Like trying to cut a sponge with a butter knife.(Please excuse the word usage--but we also have an elm called (piss)elm--Lord you talk about stinking--yikes and you cani burn it for the smell.
Lots of cotton woods but it is a Cold Smokey fire---takes so much of it to heat with.

Hickory is a prized cooking wood--BBQ-ers love it and a cord can cost you.
You can use it too heat tho--its seems like such a waste but hey if you get cold enough--LOL.
I would love to be able to build a smokehouse and use hickory----wonderful smell.
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Old 01-29-2014, 09:18 AM
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Oak s a mainstay wood for wood burners---it s dream to split---we also have golden oak and I wont use it for fire. You can tho--it should be used for making furniture etc.
Some black oak and God forbid elm--nasty stuff to split unless its dried just right.Like trying to cut a sponge with a butter knife.(Please excuse the word usage--but we also have an elm called (piss)elm--Lord you talk about stinking--yikes and you cani burn it for the smell.
Lots of cotton woods but it is a Cold Smokey fire---takes so much of it to heat with.

Hickory is a prized cooking wood--BBQ-ers love it and a cord can cost you.
You can use it too heat tho--its seems like such a waste but hey if you get cold enough--LOL.
I would love to be able to build a smokehouse and use hickory----wonderful smell.
Green hickory is the best wood for for my outdoor water stove there is.
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Old 01-29-2014, 09:27 AM
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Green hickory is the best wood for for my outdoor water stove there is.
Green? how do you get it too burn-green?
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:33 AM
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Green? how do you get it too burn-green?

any wood burns green or season.

A water stove is nothing but a blast furnance where the blower is controller by the thermostat measuring water temperature. the hot water circulates based on the thermostat in the house. If the house needs heat, the hot water from the stove circulates thru the house and drops off heat in the house. The water returns to the furnace colder and the water thermostat in the furnance turns on the blower which start the fire blazing again. Water then gets back up to temperature ( 170 degrees) then shuts the blower down. coals of wood stay hot waiting for the next blast of air to fire it up again. -- all awaiting the next cycle.

If you use dry seasoned wood it is gone almost immediately. green wood will in the firebox 30" x 30" x 30" will last 12 hours.
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:17 PM
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any wood burns green or season.

A water stove is nothing but a blast furnance where the blower is controller by the thermostat measuring water temperature. the hot water circulates based on the thermostat in the house. If the house needs heat, the hot water from the stove circulates thru the house and drops off heat in the house. The water returns to the furnace colder and the water thermostat in the furnance turns on the blower which start the fire blazing again. Water then gets back up to temperature ( 170 degrees) then shuts the blower down. coals of wood stay hot waiting for the next blast of air to fire it up again. -- all awaiting the next cycle.

If you use dry seasoned wood it is gone almost immediately. green wood will in the firebox 30" x 30" x 30" will last 12 hours.
Of course it makes sense--but never had one of those contraptions---just an old woodburner.
And a house so cold I used driest wood I had to get started then throwed on some that wasnt quite as dry to maintain.

It worked for years---doing what I had to do.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:44 PM
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There is a good thread on another forum that I am on that has quite a collection of diffrent innovations my favortie is the super dangerous one with the giant Flywheel
http://www.permies.com/t/6466/woodla...-chopping-wood
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:45 PM
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I think a great one for small scale is putting wood into a tire and chopping it that way it is good for chopping lot of kindling
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Old 01-30-2014, 01:43 AM
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Txanne, I get a charge out of how you guys have this apparently wonderful burning oak wood in an area that doesn't get cold. lol

I have never found cottonwood to be as you say and heaven knows I've probably burned more of the stuff than most anyone alive. If a cottonwood tree dies standing up and gets to stand and cure until the bark comes off, it makes a good firewood that burns fast and hot. I prefer this to some woods that burn long but don't give off the heat.

We have ash but it splits poorly, nasty stuff, burns a long time but doesn't burn really hot. We also burn lots of siberian elm as that's one of the main trees we have here. Have burned some Russian olive which isn't bad, and some mulberry which is so so but the smoke stinks.

I kind of burn whatever I can get my hands on. I like redcedar in the cookstove as it burns hot and fast and smells nice. Most of the time I burn old lumber in the cookstove as that's easy to come by and works up into nice small pieces for the little firebox a wood range has. In the furnace I burn whatever I can throw at it including chunks of innertube I get from the local filling station. That will get a fire started and going.

I save my sawdust from the buzz saw and then stir it into buckets of waste oil. This then can be scooped into milk cartons , or plastic bags that hold about two quarts to a gallon. That will get a cold stove snorting.

Right now I'm burning mostly elm. Like I said, we really don't have wood up here that splits worth a hoot. We have to warm ourselves twice working up wood, when we burn it and when we cut it.

The stickler is the best investment I've made. It will split ugly stringy stuff and if you get stuck, just put the thing in reverse and back yourself out of it.
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Old 01-30-2014, 10:46 AM
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OLD
Living off grid a bit further north in Texas---my old house(80yrsold) was so cold that water would freeze in my someday kitchen.
(And yes North Texas as well as NW Texas can get some kind of cold.)
I worked in a wood pile---and had access to many kinds of wood and cottonwoods cut in the woods by loggers was generally sent overseas to basket and or coffin makers.
I wasn't picky if I was cold but stayed away from it---

Its very interesting to me how different woods work in different parts of the country
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Old 01-30-2014, 11:26 AM
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......................
I kind of burn whatever I can get my hands on. I like redcedar in the cookstove as it burns hot and fast and smells nice. Most of the time I burn old lumber in the cookstove as that's easy to come by and works up into nice small pieces for the little firebox a wood range has. ..............

.
absolutely true. I cut whatever is easiest to get to drag out. we got lots of oak varieties but I cant go thru the woods hunting them.
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Old 02-12-2014, 01:35 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jDR_...edirect=1#t=67
This is the vipkruves axe
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:20 PM
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New guy here and I just came across this thread but I just had my wife split and stack a cord of firewood and it only took her two days to do the job. She is getting older and slowing down some but it is important for men to remember that, as women grow older, it becomes harder for them to maintain the same quality and quantity of firewood splitting as when they were younger. When you notice this, try not to yell at them. Some are overly sensitive, and thereís nothing worse than an oversensitive woman.

She had to take a break when she was only half-finished splitting the wood. I tried not to make a scene. Iím a fair man. I tell her to fix herself a nice, big, cold glass of freshly squeezed lemonade and just sit for a while. And, as long as she is making one for herself, she may as well make one for me, too.

I know that I probably look like a saint in the way I support her. Iím not saying that showing this much consideration is easy. Many men will find it difficult. Some will find it impossible! Nobody knows better than I do how frustrating women get as they get older. However, guys, even if you just use a little more tact and less criticism of your aging girlfriend or wife because of this post, I will consider that writing it was well worthwhile.
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