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  #21  
Old 02-17-2014, 01:57 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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Consider how much laundry you have to do and how often you do it. I do two to three loads daily, not counting bed linens. So, this is what I have in mind for myself for doing laundry off grid.

I added a wonder washer for doing small loads like dish towels, dish cloths, socks, and other small items. In March I will getting the double rinse tubs with the wringer, and this summer I will add the James Hand Washer with the wringer so that should take care of washing the clothes.

For drying I have an outside clothes line and an inside clothes line in the sun room that when I can't hang clothes outside I can hang them in the sun room and I also hope to add a couple drying racks for the sun room.

My dryer is propane and I keep extra propane tanks for it and for the propane generator so in an emergency I could dry clothes in my dryer if I had to.

For me I want things that I could do laundry fairly easy in order to be able to keep up with it and without depending on anything that runs on gasoline or propane, for one never knows if money would be available to buy it with, or if it would be available even if one had the money.
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  #22  
Old 02-17-2014, 08:54 PM
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I have seen many older Matag ringer washers that someone put a small gas engine on . Not sure but some of those washers did not look all that old so I think someone might be making them new. Just did a web search Lehmans sells a wringer washer new made in Saudi Arabia that comes with an electric motor. They evidently took the electric motor off and replaced it with a gas set up.
The engine can be moved around and set up to run many different things at different times.

A source for a wringer http://www.wringerhand.com/ .

Last edited by ABCD; 02-17-2014 at 09:17 PM.
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  #23  
Old 02-18-2014, 12:07 AM
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I solved the summer washing for my own cloths, I just don't wear any. All the neighbors know to honk before coming past the gate. Just kidding sort of. I built a little guest cabin where we keep the washer, it's a gravity drain so no pump to worry about. I have a little propane heater for the winter time and a frost free inside for the gravity feed water. It also has a little wood stove that heats water.
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  #24  
Old 02-18-2014, 07:59 PM
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I think that when looking for the sweet spot in a technologies development as far as off grid use goes you should look back in time to the product that was released right before the electric version of the same product was released I think that because it would have all of the very best technology up to that point in time with out using electricity. Which makes me think that it would be the easiest to use. Just my thoughts though.
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  #25  
Old 02-22-2014, 12:37 AM
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I solved the summer washing for my own cloths, I just don't wear any. All the neighbors know to honk before coming past the gate. Just kidding sort of. I built a little guest cabin where we keep the washer, it's a gravity drain so no pump to worry about. I have a little propane heater for the winter time and a frost free inside for the gravity feed water. It also has a little wood stove that heats water.
I was going to add something interesting about the laundry set ups I've seen when visiting local Amish farms, but the mental image from the above post jes' drove it right out of my mind..........
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  #26  
Old 02-22-2014, 01:02 AM
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You too?
Be interesting to (pop) in for a visit on BOB huh?

:
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  #27  
Old 03-24-2014, 04:51 PM
Jfaust Jfaust is offline
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Default off grid clothes washing ideas

Some great ideas - thanks!
ever try LOC or liquid organic cleaner - it's biodegradable & highly concentrated so a little goes a long long ways, can't think who makes it, use it all the time when I'm camping or backpacking.
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  #28  
Old 04-26-2014, 04:42 PM
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I found a good article on washing clothes without electricity.
http://momwithaprep.com/how-to-wash-...t-electricity/

Many people have forgotten WHY we use HOT water.
It not to CLEAN clothes, but to kill germs.
People have gotten lazy, or cheap, or both, and stopped using hot water.
That is why the reports of bedbugs, lice, mites and other nasty things are on the increase.
That is the same reason that we use bleach. Not to whiten clothes. It's primary use is to kill germs.
Clean is not just the absence of dirt or stains, but the absence of things that me infect or infest you.


Below are a few links to the products:
http://beprepared.com/mobile-washer-...g-machine.html

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=AQNACJEM8PUJ1
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  #29  
Old 04-29-2014, 02:41 AM
oldtimer oldtimer is offline
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Originally Posted by offgridbob View Post
I solved the summer washing for my own cloths, I just don't wear any. All the neighbors know to honk before coming past the gate. Just kidding sort of. I built a little guest cabin where we keep the washer, it's a gravity drain so no pump to worry about. I have a little propane heater for the winter time and a frost free inside for the gravity feed water. It also has a little wood stove that heats water.
When I was growing up, many people had these little wash houses. That, or you washed on the back porch or if you had running water, in the basment.

Our neighbors did their washing in the wash house until twenty years ago, then I bought the wash house and moved it home. I use it for a library. Our wringer's in the basement and we have a floor drain. Still a few folks use them. All my folks have ever had. They sure save water and soap.

Maytag quit making a wringer in the early 80s we have the last one sold new here. Speedqueen had one up until not too long ago. Most can be converted to engine power. Maytag was easiest to convert. Real old Maytags had engines.

We had my great great grandma's world war one model when I was a kid. Dad had put an engine on it and TxAnne's right, we got a jolt from that sucker many a time. Found it happed to wear rubber boots when washing as if you were barefoot you were in for a shocking experience. One day the thing tipped over and that old cast aluminum cracked on the concrete. So we got another old junker. Come Christmas that year, Daddy bought Mama a new Maytag. It came while she was at ladies aid and Daddy and I got it down the basement and hid it hoping she wouldn't see it before Christmas Eve. She didn't but Mama must have wondered at how helpful we kids had suddenly gotten to run "down cellar" for canned goods or for somehthing from the freezer. We were horrified one night at supper when she just took off for the basement without a bye your leave but she came back from the freezer and said nothing. Christmas eve and we all opened our gifts then we told Mama she didn't have one , she'd have to go downstairs to get hers. That old machine washed the clothes every week for over thirty years. Maytag knew how to build a machine. I think she has a Speedqueen down there right now that Daddy bought at an auction for a couple bucks.

They're getting hard to find. The Maytags from this neck of the woods either are still in use or have been sent to Mennonites in Mexico and Belize along with our two cylinder tractors and cream separators.
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  #30  
Old 04-29-2014, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtimer View Post
When I was growing up, many people had these little wash houses. That, or you washed on the back porch or if you had running water, in the basment.

Our neighbors did their washing in the wash house until twenty years ago, then I bought the wash house and moved it home. I use it for a library. Our wringer's in the basement and we have a floor drain. Still a few folks use them. All my folks have ever had. They sure save water and soap.

Maytag quit making a wringer in the early 80s we have the last one sold new here. Speedqueen had one up until not too long ago. Most can be converted to engine power. Maytag was easiest to convert. Real old Maytags had engines.

We had my great great grandma's world war one model when I was a kid. Dad had put an engine on it and TxAnne's right, we got a jolt from that sucker many a time. Found it happed to wear rubber boots when washing as if you were barefoot you were in for a shocking experience. One day the thing tipped over and that old cast aluminum cracked on the concrete. So we got another old junker. Come Christmas that year, Daddy bought Mama a new Maytag. It came while she was at ladies aid and Daddy and I got it down the basement and hid it hoping she wouldn't see it before Christmas Eve. She didn't but Mama must have wondered at how helpful we kids had suddenly gotten to run "down cellar" for canned goods or for somehthing from the freezer. We were horrified one night at supper when she just took off for the basement without a bye your leave but she came back from the freezer and said nothing. Christmas eve and we all opened our gifts then we told Mama she didn't have one , she'd have to go downstairs to get hers. That old machine washed the clothes every week for over thirty years. Maytag knew how to build a machine. I think she has a Speedqueen down there right now that Daddy bought at an auction for a couple bucks.

They're getting hard to find. The Maytags from this neck of the woods either are still in use or have been sent to Mennonites in Mexico and Belize along with our two cylinder tractors and cream separators.
I saw a new one and it was priced at $1200.00---but a bargin as its not subject to the computer failures in the new push button ones.
My DD had to replace hers 3 times--she went back to the manual setting model.

The new computerized ones are subject to power surges/water pressure.
The chips are very sensitive.
Maytag was a tough machine.But a tad expensive and folks wanted quick washers/NOT quality.
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  #31  
Old 04-29-2014, 04:09 PM
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I saw a new one and it was priced at $1200.00---but a bargin as its not subject to the computer failures in the new push button ones.
My DD had to replace hers 3 times--she went back to the manual setting model.

The new computerized ones are subject to power surges/water pressure.
The chips are very sensitive.
Maytag was a tough machine.But a tad expensive and folks wanted quick washers/NOT quality.
Unfortunately, Maytag is no longer its own company like they were when they made appliances and cheese. lol

Nowadays folks have these front load things where they always stink like a dirty dish rag. Couldn't give me one.

I've also noticed these stupid automatics they have now days and their "energy saving" have you washing in cold water all the time. We found the only way to beat it is to turn the two hoses around. So when you're washing in pure cold, then at least you're washing in hot.
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  #32  
Old 04-29-2014, 07:01 PM
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Whirlpool bought out Maytag a few years back.

If you like those old wringer washers then I think you'll love these pictures:
http://www.maytagclub.com/page-16.htm
My best friend down the street has one in his basement. Looks like the 1945 model.
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  #33  
Old 11-02-2014, 08:00 PM
Lizg Female Lizg is offline
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Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
In a pinch--tub/bath tub and a plunger--worked off grid for me.
Heated water in 2--#3 washtubs.
I did this too, and used a scrub brush for work clothes, while we were remodeling and without a washer for a couple months.
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  #34  
Old 11-04-2014, 06:31 PM
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My neighbor in Arkansas had a kick-start on her Maytag (similar to a motorcycle!) - and it ran off a gas engine. Her wash house was a screened gazebo in a cow pasture, which is a lovely place to do laundry except in the winter. The drawback (in my view) was the engine was a bit smokey and didn't vent outside.

They also had a black barrel up on stilts so it could warm up in the sun. Don't know if she also had a wood-fired water heater - but I do know they also used that wash house for canning, which kept the heat and smells out of the house. It was a pretty sweet setup!
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  #35  
Old 11-04-2014, 06:52 PM
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All summer at cow camp I heated water from a faucet on the fire and used a wash tub and scrub board. Used fels naptha soap. Worked great until we had to change over to creek water. Since we were in drought, had to take the clothes to laundry in town because there were too many critters in the little water the creek had. Don't think I would like doing it that way in the winter. Have my BIL's family's old maytag on standby in the shed, though. When I get my own place...
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  #36  
Old 11-04-2014, 10:11 PM
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I would like to someday buy an old three speed bike and mount it so it would be stationary and use it to run a washer off the back wheel. It would serve two purposes, the cloths would be washed and one could keep in shape by peddling, good for cardio.
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  #37  
Old 11-05-2014, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
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Nowadays folks have these front load things where they always stink like a dirty dish rag. Couldn't give me one.

.
I have never had my front loader stink and I have used one since 1979. During that time I have gone through several.

what you do is you leave the door open . Of course it gets smelly if you close the door on a wet environment.

You sure could give me one.

We get terribly dirty working. When we built our house and I did laundry by hand I soaked our closthes and spread dirty, soaked jeans flat on a slab, then brushed them with a long handled brush. that was the most energy efficient way I could do it. they got very clean in a very short time, but rinsing is the big job. I hate washing socks by hand most of all.
I still presoak with Triphosphate.
the rinse water I dump on the compost. We need all the phosphate we can get here.
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  #38  
Old 01-20-2015, 09:38 PM
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My Mother had one.
Dad put an electric motor on it later.

But it didnt have a shock proof connection and it would knock you down--which is iffy--when your washing for a big family and water did splash around.

Gas one always needed maintence and was NOISEY.
Your story could be ours. Daddy bought Mama a new Maytag eventually and she used that for years until it wore out, then he bought some old junker on a sale for a couple of bucks. The washing machines keep going down the basement but no one ever hauls the clunkers out. Must be a half doz. down there now. Here a few weeks ago, Mama got her hand caught in the wringer and the machine was an old junker and the wringer release wouldn't release. She was hung up down there for four hours. She started out a hollerin' but Daddy's so deaf he couldn't hear over the TV. Finally he was wondering why she didn't call him to dinner and he was getting hungry. He went down the basement and found her standing there. I don't think I'd have gone on to make him dinner, but she did. Her fingers were all skinned up, so we're looking for a better washer for her now.

I'd suggest to the OP you get a Maytag in decent shape and convert it to a gas engine. It's the easiest to convert. Get a Honda engine. They're very easy to start, run well, and even the Amish are equipping theirs with a Honda.

And this soy stuff or whatever someone soaked their laundry in. What in the world is it?

Last edited by oldtimer; 01-20-2015 at 09:39 PM. Reason: Ask question.
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  #39  
Old 01-21-2015, 01:09 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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sbarb,

We use the homemade powder detergent; you need to wear a dust mask, 'cause it's hard on the lungs. Or, take it outside when you're mixing/grating the soap. (We use Ivory). The one most recipes call for is even more caustic when you grate it (Fels).

We use very little to do our wash; clothes come out just fine.

There is pre-grated you can buy online to avoid the dust.

Nice part is that a little goes a long way once you make up a batch.
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  #40  
Old 01-21-2015, 01:16 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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DavidOH,

Hmmm....we had one of these in our basement - HATED IT! (Also too young to maneuver the handle on it at the time).

I remember my parents "sending out" bags of laundry to "Leader Cleaners" here in the city. The pick up guy reminded me of the milkman that used to visit. Always got some conversation (I wasn't in grammar school yet).

My mom would hang up wet laundry in the basement (had lines strung up).

When I got older and could reach, I got to hang up laundry. HATED IT, LOL.

Cold, cold and cold in winter. Used to hurt my hands. Heavy as all get-go to hang. Took forever and for whatever they saved by not drying it at the Laundromat, musta been a lot, LOL.
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