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Old 02-26-2014, 07:15 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Default polishing concrete

Has anyone done that?
I really need some advice on that. We made a concrete kitchen counter in 2005. I have never been happy with it. At the time it seems here nobody heard of it, and I went all the way to Louisville to buy stain and sealer. The sealer has been really crappy. I have to sand/polish the whole thing and hopefully find the right kind of sealer. I am wondering how best get the sealer off that is on now ( it has many patches were it came off) Thanks in advance
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Old 02-27-2014, 01:52 AM
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Maybe this will help you decide:
http://www.concretenetwork.com/fix-c...g-sealers.html
Quote:
By far the most popular and effective method of removing any type of sealer is to use a chemical stripper. This is especially true with decorative concrete, since maintaining the profile and color of the concrete is critical. Chemical strippers have undergone a major transformation in recent years. The desire for more environmentally friendly chemicals has led to the creation of a new family of strippers that are easy on the environment. These include citrus and soy-based strippers that use natural esters and oils to break down the sealer. Newlook International has an environmentally friendly stripper called Easystrip. These natural strippers have little impact on the environment, but they take longer to work. More aggressive chemical strippers based on methylene chloride work much faster. These strippers have been used for years to remove coatings and paints, but they are volatile and potentially hazardous -- to both the environment and the applicator. So it really comes down to time vs. environmental impact and safety.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:09 AM
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Question

You can get polyurethane paint in many different colors now. Or you could use the concrete as a base to install ceramic tile or formica.
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Old 03-04-2014, 03:57 AM
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Can you just "sand" that old sealer off? I know we just bought a house where the garage floor has a high polished concrete. It was slicker than snot when it got wet. My husband went at it with a floor buffer which is kind of a giant sander. The sealer came off pretty well with some work. He thinks they used the same sealer that they put on the deck, but we aren't sure. I just know the deck and concrete garage are both super slick. We hate the sealer that is on both of them. It is pretty stuff, but very slick when damp.
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Old 04-01-2014, 04:30 PM
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My brother rented a floor sander for his concrete floors and it was AMAZING what sandpaper can do for concrete. So you might rent a belt sander and see if that puts a polish on that's part of the concrete. His floors actually looked more like terazzo and all he wanted to do was get them smooth to put carpet over.
I wonder if Ames Liquid Granite would work for you. It's made for floors and decks, but if it takes walking on, it might give you a granite-look counter, which is very popular right now. I researched the product yesterday when looking for a water proofer & found this stuff by accident. http://www.amesresearch.com/app_LG.htm

I'd like to know more about your counter top. I've wanted to try that myself - only I'd embed small shells & grind them off, then fill the voids with grout so they looked like fossils. What do you dislike about it? (looks, function?)

If you really hate the concrete, maybe tile over it? You'd still want to sand/rough up the surface so the mastic would stick properly, though.
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Old 04-01-2014, 05:15 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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What irritates me is that crappy sealer. It is not tough enough and there are big splotches where it came off, and what do you do with a splotchy countertop. I am treating it carefully like a raw egg, put newspaper down (do that anyway) to peel taters on and stuff like that. Thanks for all the good advice.
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Old 04-01-2014, 08:43 PM
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Don't get me started! Too bad we have to buy something to find out whether it does what it's supposed to or not. And if it doesn't, it usually costs more & takes more time to get rid of it that it did to get it in the first place!
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